Tag Archives: World War II

Wall Builders — A Shield of Righteousness


Stand therefore, having girded your waist with truth,
having put on the breastplate of righteousness.
(Ephesians 
6:14)

This week, (September 1) marks the 75th anniversary of the official beginning of WWII. On September 3, 1939, President Roosevelt addressed the nation with one of his famous “Fireside Chats” stating his resolve to remain a neutral nation in the war, which culminated in an American Proclamation of Neutrality declared on September 5th.

However, all of that changed with the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. In his famous “date which will live in infamy” message to Congress requesting that theUnited States officially declare war on Japan, President Roosevelt stated, “With confidence in our armed forces — with the unbounding determination of our people — we will gain the inevitable triumph — so help us God.”

This confidence in God and our military (along with his concern for individual American soldiers) was later evident in what is now known as The Heart-Shield Bible. These Bibles (used during World War II) were designed to fit securely into the chest pocket of a soldier’s uniform. The metal plates were securely attached to the front cover of the Bible to stop a bullet from reaching the soldier’s heart (which they did on several occasions). In our library at WallBuilders we

have several of these World War II Bibles. In the back is a section of psalms and hymns, including “My Country ‘Tis of Thee,”  “America the Beautiful,” and “The Star Spangled Banner.”  In the front, there is a note to the soldiers directly from President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

 

“As Commander-in-Chief I take pleasure in commending the reading of the Bible to all who serve in the armed forces of the United States. Throughout the centuries men of many faiths and diverse origins have found in the Sacred Book words of wisdom, counsel and inspiration. It is a foundation of strength and now, as always, an aid in attaining the highest aspirations of the human soul.”

Well before America joined World War II, on the 400th anniversary of the English Bible in 1935, President Roosevelt reminded the nation of the Bible’s importance in America’s formation and continuance:  

 

“We cannot read the history of our rise and development as a Nation without reckoning with the place the Bible has occupied in shaping the advances of the Republic. . . . Where we have been truest and most consistent in obeying its precepts we have attained the greatest measure of contentment and prosperity; where it has been to us as the words of a book that is sealed, we have faltered in our way, lost our range finders, and found our progress checked. It is well that we observe this anniversary of the first publishing of our English Bible. The time is propitious to place a fresh emphasis upon its place and worth in the economy of our life as a people.”

Many other presidents encouraged Americans to read the Bible — including President John Quincy Adams. Interestingly, before becoming president and while serving as a diplomat to Russia under President James Madison, Adams wrote his ten-year-old son nine letters on the importance of reading the Bible, how to read through the Bible once a year, and how to get the most application form what he read. Immediately after Adams’ death in 1847, these letters were published as a book to make his wise counsel on the Bible available to all Americans. Called John Quincy Adams Letters to His Son, on the Bible and ItsTeachings, WallBuilders recently reprinted this work in ebook format. Visit our website to get your copy and enjoy the remarkable spiritual insight of this great President of the United States.

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237 – August 25 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

John_Birch

The first American martyred by the communists

John Birch, on August 25, was martyred by Chinese communist soldiers near the end of World War II, in Hsuchow, China. His influence had spread over hundreds of miles where he was known to the nationals as “Bey Shang We“, a title of respect. John Birch had gone to China, after finishing a three year course in two years at the Bible Baptist Seminary in Ft. Worth, Texas, the Fundamentalist school sponsored by Dr. J. Frank Norris, Pastor of the First Baptist Church, and the World Baptist Fellowship. He had gone there after graduating from Mercer University in 1939, magna cum laude. In one year John could speak Chinese. After Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, the Japanese attempted to arrest him, but he escaped. He gave himself to the preaching of the gospel and to the encouraging of the saints as he traveled in war-torn China. While traveling to minister to suffering believers, John was put in touch with Col. Jimmy Doolittle and the four airmen from his plane that he had to ditch in China after their bombing raid on Tokyo. It was Birch that led them to safety. At that point he enlisted in the U.S. Army and served as the Intelligence Officer for Gen. Charles Chennault. He was able, because of his knowledge of the language and culture to help in setting up radio contacts. John knew the dangers of communism and witnessed its inroads. John’s parents were Presbyterian missionaries in India on Sept. 12, 1918, when John was born. Because of recurring malaria George Birch moved his family back to the states, became a Baptist, and moved to Macon, Georgia where John received Christ at the age of eleven.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 350-52.

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V-J Day, August 14, 1945


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

V-J Day, AUGUST 14, 1945, President Harry S Truman stated at a News Conference announcing the end of World War II:

“I have received this afternoon a message from the Japanese Government…

‘His Majesty the Emperor is prepared to authorize and ensure the signature of his Government and the Imperial General Headquarters of the necessary terms for carrying out the provisions of the Potsdam declaration…and all the forces under their control wherever located to cease active operations, to surrender arms.’”

The next day, in anticipation of the Jewish New Year, President Truman stated:

“I extend to all my fellow Americans of Jewish faith my hearty congratulations and best wishes for New Year’s Day.

The enemies of civilization who would have destroyed completely all freedom of religion have been defeated. All faiths unite in thanksgiving to Almighty God on our victory over the forces of evil.

Let us now all join to create the kind of peace settlement which will keep alive freedom of religious belief all over the world, and prevent the recurrence of all this misery and destruction.

That is the most fitting memorial we can erect to those who have fought and suffered and labored and died in this struggle to preserve decency for mankind.”

On August 16, 1945, Truman proclaimed a Day of Prayer:

“The warlords of Japan…have surrendered unconditionally…

This is the end of the…schemes of dictators to enslave the peoples of the world, destroy their civilization, and institute a new era of darkness and degradation.”

Truman continued:

“Our global victory has come from the courage…of free men and women united in determination to fight. It has come from the massive strength of arms…created by peace-loving peoples who knew that unless they won, decency in the world would end.

It has come from millions of peaceful citizens…turned soldiers overnight – who showed a ruthless enemy that they were not afraid to fight…”

Harry S Truman concluded:

“It has come with the help of God, Who was with us in the early days of adversity and…Who has now brought us to this glorious day of triumph.

Let us give thanks to Him and…dedicated ourselves to follow in His ways.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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354 – Dec. 20 – This Day in Baptist History Past


Eleven Baptists martyred for Christ

1943 – Eleven Baptist missionaries suffered martyrdom at the hands of the Japanese on the Island of Panay in the Philippines during World War II. As the Japanese troops approached, all Americans fled to the mountains. Businessmen, miners, their families, and the missionaries fled as best they could. The eleven included – Dr. and Mrs. Frederick W. (Ruth) Meyer, Miss Jennie Adams, James Howard and Charma Covell, Erle F. and Louise Rounds and son Earl Douglas Rounds, Francis H. and Gertrude Rose, Miss Signe Erickson and Miss Dorothy Dowell. The group was initially successful in their effort, and a letter from Mr. Covell arrived at the mission board office in March 1944 having come through a circuitous route. The letter had been written on May 16, 1943, and was addressed from “Hopevale,” the name they had given their hideaway. The Provost Marshal General’s office in Washington gave a brief report on the Covell’s death on March 20, 1944, however final confirmation was received from Mr. Engracio C. Alora, the General Secretary of the Convention of Philippine Baptist Churches, in a letter dated April 11, 1945, in which it was officially stated that all eleven missionaries had been slaughtered on December 20, 1943, though captured on the 19th. The local Baptist pastor had gotten to the camp as soon as it was safe, and had interred the bodies. The missionaries were told that they were under the death warrant. They asked if they might first have time to pray, and an hour was spent before the throne of grace. They then stood and declared that they were ready, and the shade drops on this awful crime.
[This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 694-96. Jesse R. Wilson, Through Shining Archay(Valley Forge, Pa.: Board of International Ministers of the American Baptist Churches, 1949), p.5.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

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Christians Cave to a Confused, Corrupt Culture! Don Boys, Ph.D.


 

http://donboys.cstnews.com/christians-cave-to-a-confused-corrupt-culture

 

The early Christian churches captured and transformed the Roman Empire with the Gospel! Famous historian Will Durant wrote, “Caesar and Christ had met in the arena and Christ had won.” That would not be an accurate statement of contemporary Christianity in view of the major mischief of the U.S. Supreme Court recently, the Congress, and the President. It appears that Churches have lost their power, Christians have lost their purity, and the culture is in the pits. Christians have caved to the confused, corrupt culture and the reason is massive pulpit failure.

 

Many loosey-goosey preachers teach that Christians should be deeply involved with the culture: sing all the popular songs, attend all the vile Hollywood movies, watch the most popular television shows, wear the newest clothes (however seductive, ugly, and revealing they may be), and be able to “jive” with the most ungodly people even if normal listeners have no comprehension of what is said.

 

However, that is not the way it is supposed to be.  Christians are not to be moved by the culture; they are to move the culture. That is not happening today. Professing Christians, even members of Bible-preaching churches, are among the most worldly, weird, even wicked people in town! Most show no shame at their ungodly life and even defend it!

 

The prophet asked in Jeremiah 6:15, “Were they ashamed when they had committed abomination? nay, they were not at all ashamed, neither could they blush.” As years have passed, I have been surprised then shocked and stunned  at what I have observed in good churches: the general worldly attitude, the aping of the world’s dress standards, the use of four letter words, the loose handling of the opposite sex even in public. I wonder if parents have tried to instill in their children any kind of character. When reproved, they usually are offended and hardly ever are ashamed. Is shame passé like guilt, gratitude, and grace?

 

Those who declare that “It’s always been this way” are wrong. While there have always been some people without character, it has not been general until recent years. Early Christians influenced society by treating slaves, children, and women compassionately. Christians picked up abandoned babies left on the street to die and raised them as their own even when it was illegal to do so! Christ placed women on a high pedestal and Paul continued to move the culture of his day. The early Christians “turned the world upside down!” Pagan religions had the Empire by the throat and Christians broke that hold and destroyed the pagan religions with the truth. Christ’s birth even designates the date.

 

Christ established the Good Samaritan ethic to sacrifice so as to help others who were suffering. He also told us to treat others the way we want to be treated. He taught His followers to be gracious and generous to the less fortunate. Moreover, He taught us to pray for our enemies and do good to those who despitefully use us. Such teachings changed the culture and set the tone for two thousand years. The emphasis on doing one’s best, striving for success, developed into the university system of the Middle Ages; and the major left leaning, anti-Christian, socialist, anything-goes American universities were begun by the sacrificial giving of Bible believing Christians. Such institutions today are without shame, spirituality, and little scholarship.

 

High standards of justice going back to the Old Testament and continuing into the New were unknown in Egypt, Ur,

Nineveh, Greece, and Rome. Our world has been influenced far more by Jerusalem than Rome or Athens. But today the influence is Hollywood, New York, and Paris. Few Christians choose to be numbered as a “peculiar” people so they are just odd instead.

 

Jim Daly of Focus on the Family told the media it would be “foolhardy not to recognize that the culture is moving more” in the direction of support for same-sex marriage. He also signaled a willingness to work with abortion-rights groups to find common ground on adoption.  Such is the successor of Dr. James Dodson who was forced out of Focus for being too confrontational with the culture. Daly doesn’t understand that Christians are supposed to challenge, confront, and change the culture!
Recently the head of Exodus International apologized for his stand against homosexuality and their attempt to help sodomites become normal, decent people. He and his board closed down their work and faded into the corrupt culture. One reason given for the shutdown is that the culture is changing. Sure it is because of people like him who have no anchor and no chart to guide them.
Most Christians are mental zombies gorging junk food in front of a television set. Seeking liberty, such carnal Christians bounce from liberty to license to licentiousness.

 

H. L. Hastings, in 1844, visited the Fiji Islands and was shocked to find that a human could be bought for $7.00 (or a musket), less than the price of a cow! Moreover, the purchased human could be beaten, worked to death then eaten. Then, the Gospel came to the islands and about 1200 churches were established and no human could be bought for any price. The true Gospel changes the culture.

 

During World War II, on a remote Pacific island, an American soldier met an English-speaking native carrying a Bible. The G.I. pointed to the Bible and sneered, “We educated people don’t put much faith in that Book anymore.” The islander grinned, patted his own belly saying, “Well, it’s a good thing for you that we do, or else you’d be in here by now.” Christ changes the culture but modern Christians have been moved by the culture into a corrupt, cowardly, compromising life.

 

Christians should not only be right when the world is right but be right when the world is wrong.
We don’t want or need a church that moves with the world but a church that moves the world. There is movement today but movement is not always progress. All movement seems to be in the wrong direction.  At least, in the USA.

 

(Dr. Don Boys is a former member of the Indiana House of Representatives, author of 15 books, frequent guest on television and radio talk shows, and wrote columns for USA Today for 8 years. His shocking book, ISLAM: America’s Trojan Horse!; Christian Resistance: An Idea Whose Time Has Come–Again!; and The God Haters are all

available at Amazon.com. These columns go to newspapers, magazines, television, and radio stations and may be used without change from title through the end tag. His web sites are www.cstnews.com and www.Muslimfact.com and www.thegodhaters.com. Contact Don for an interview or talk show.)

 

Copyright 2013, Don Boys, Ph.D.

 

 

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229 – Aug. 17 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Dedicated to faithful Sunday school teachers

 

1917 – Walter Olaf Olson was born.  He was twelve the day the stock market crashed in Oct. 1929. Growing up in the dark days of the Great Depression he began going to Sunday school at the Bethel Baptist church in Duluth, Minnesota.  It was there that he came to a saving knowledge of Jesus Christ by His atoning blood through the witness of his faithful SS teacher.  He began serving Christ with great joy and determined to prepare for Christian service.  However World War II broke out and changed his plans.  He enlisted as so many did at that time and was assigned to the air force where he became a radio operator/waist-gunner in the midsection of an aircraft where he participated in fifty successful bombing raids over Europe.  There was one more to be made before he was to return home to his sweetheart, marriage and seminary.  It was to be a cluster bomb attack on German positions over Northern France.  Walter’s crew held their usual prayer meeting before taking off but felt something strange.  They encountered heavy flak, the plane next to them was lost almost immediately.  “Ole” as they called Walter was the only one hit of the entire crew, the shrapnel having hit his heart taking him home instantly.  The Captain of the plane led one of the officers to Christ the next day and many others were led to a deeper walk with the Lord because of “Ole’s” death.  Whether we live or die our desire is that all Glory should be His.  Thank God for all of the Sunday school teachers who have given of themselves to reach boys and girls for Christ. [This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 449451]
Prepared by Rev. Dale R. Hart – rom623drh2@msn.com

 

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57 – Feb. 26 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


The Crown of Life

Selma Maxville was born in an impoverished home in Cape Town, Mississippi on Feb. 26, 1883.  Her mother prayed that one of her children would be a missionary.  It seemed bleak for Selma, when at thirty she was caring for her invalid mother.  After her mother died, Selma enrolled in a medical school and then later in a Bible College.  Finally at the age of 33 she left for the field of Burma where she worked with the Mons people in Moulmein, a city that had been pioneered by Adoniram and Ann Judson.  There she served in the Ellen Mitchell Memorial Hospital, then known as the American Hospital.  After she reached retirement in 1940 she opened a hospital in the township of Mudon.  When World War II began she fled to India as a refugee.  After the war she returned and re-opened the hospital.  In her last letter to her mission her request was that she could continue to serve without pay if there was no other nurse to take her place.  At age 67 she took a thirteen year old patient to the hospital at Moulmein and was kidnapped.  The demand was

for 10,000 kyats and 10 grams of gold.  She wrote to her friends that they were not to redeem her for God was with her.  She was bound with an iron chain to a post of a hut in a rice paddy field.  She was so revered that a dozen men rescued her and transported her by ox cart to Mudon.  Her Captors ambushed them, Miss Maxville was machine gunned down and expired in her hospital in Mudon.  They have erected a memorial in her honor in Kamarweit, between Moulmein and Amherst.  Both the mother who prayed, the daughter who went and the men who died in the rescue attempt will all one day “receive the crown of life .”

Dr. Greg J. Dixon, adapted from: This Day in Baptist History III (David L. Cummins), pp. 116 – 118.

 

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34 – Feb. 03 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


The Eternal Optimist
Glen H Schunk was born in Scales Mound, Illinois, on February 3, 1918 into a German-Irish Catholic family.
Glen met an honor student from his local school in Freeport, Illinois, on a blind date, Irma Hartwig. After two years of courtship, they married August 29, 1938, in Dubuque, Iowa.  Irma was converted at the age of thirteen. When Glen enthusiastically came to his new-found faith, his personal witness led some family members to the Lord.
America’s involvement in World War II  saw Glen being drafted into the army.  Being on the front lines,  often in foxholes, with bullets flying overhead, he would take out his New Testament for consolation.  During  those experiences Glen won many fellow soldiers to Christ.  Glen was wounded in action and sent to a military hospital in Naples, Italy and placed in a ward with 1,000 men.  There the Lord moved in Glen’s heart as he saw the spiritual need of the men, and concluded that God wanted him to preach.  As a result of his converts there, over 400 men were in attendance at the Bible study classes.  Many of those men went into the ministry.  Glen and Irma Shunk traveled together for twenty-two years, and in nearly 900 revival meetings, it is estimated that they witnessed the salvation of over 60,000 people.  On June 6, 1978 the Lord called his servant home.  An amazing number of preachers attended his funeral in South Bend, Indiana, with the auditorium filled with those who wished to pay respects to a man who had faithfully proclaimed the Gospel of Christ.
Dr. Dale R. Hart, adapted from:  This Day in Baptist History  III (David L. Cummins), pp. 69-70

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