Tag Archives: Samuel Harriss

14 – January 14 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

He preached through the prison grates

 

 1744 – John Pickett was born. When he was grown he had a strong leaning toward gaming and sports of all kinds. He became a dancing master which took him to Pee Dee, North Carolina, from his home in King George County, Virginia, around 1764. Under the preaching of Josiah Murphy in N.C. in 1766, Pickett was converted to Christ and baptized. He then began to loathe the sports and pleasures that he once loved and wrote his parents of this change. Upon the death of his father, he returned to his home in Fauquier County, and finding his friends in spiritual darkness, he began pleading with them in private, and later began preaching to them in public.   Josiah Murphy came and baptized a few, and later, Samuel Harriss and James Read came and baptized thirty-seven, and organized them into a church. Pickett became ordained May 27, 1772, and took the care of the church known as Carter’s Run. However there was much opposition. Once a mob broke into a meeting house, disrupted the service, and split to pieces the pulpit and communion table, while the magistrates issued their warrant. They seized John and took him to the Fauquier prison. He continued there for about three months, preaching through the grates, and admonishing as many as came to him, to repent and turn to God. Great numbers were awakened to their need of Christ under Pickett’s prison ministry.

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon; adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 19-20.

 

 

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12 – January 12 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

My peace I leave with you”

 

1724 – Samuel Harriss was born in Hanover County, Virginia. While still a youth his parents moved to Pittsylvania County where men appointed Samuel as church warden, sheriff, a justice of the peace, burgess of the county, colonel of the militia, captain of Ft. Mayo, and commissary for the Fort and Army. All of this did not satisfy his soul and he was brought under deep conviction. He attended a meeting of the sect called Baptists and heard the Murphy Boys, Joseph and William preach in a small house. He got under conviction and was gloriously saved some time in 1758 and began to follow Daniel Marshall and travel with James Read from N.C. Harriss became so effective that they called him the “Virginia Apostle.” At the invitation of Allen Wyley he went to Culpeper, Virginia and ventured as far as the Shenandoah Valley. While preaching in Orange County he was pulled down and dragged about by the hair and sometimes by one leg. On another occasion he was knocked down while preaching. In Hillsborough he was locked up for a considerable time for preaching without a license. A man owed him a debt but he said that he was so sure that God would pay him that he would discharge the debt against the man. The man was so utterly amazed that he ultimately paid him in full.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon; adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 16-17.

 

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01 – January 01 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

 

Posted: 31 Dec 2013 05:50 PM PST

 

Kiokee BaptistKiokee Baptist Church

 

 

The Southern Baptist Convention begins

 

1771 – Daniel Marshall moved to Georgia, and by the spring of 1772, he had led a small congregation in the formation of the First Baptist Church of Kiokee and served as pastor until his death in 1784. A Georgia law of 1757 prohibited any worship not “according to the rites and ceremonies of the Church of England,” but Marshall led a “brush arbor” service. As he bowed in prayer, he was interrupted by a heavy hand on his shoulder and the declaration, “You are my prisoner!” The 65 year old preacher stood to his feet only to hear the young constable inform him that he had, “preached in the parish of St. Paul.” Mrs. Marshall quoted scripture which the Lord used to bring about the official’s conviction and conversion. The Court ordered Marshall to leave the Province of Georgia. His son remembered that he quoted scripture, “Whether it be right to obey God or man, judge ye,” and he went on his way preaching with great power. This boldness bore fruit, for the 21 year old constable, Samuel Cartledge was gloriously saved and in 1777 was baptized. After serving as a deacon in 1789, Cartledge was ordained to preach and ministered in Georgia and S.C. until his death at 93. One of his preacher descendants has referred to him as, the “Colonial Saul of Tarsus.” The Separate Baptists were led  primarily by three men; Shubal Stearns, in North Carolina, Daniel Marshall, in Georgia, and Samuel Harriss, in Virginia. It was because of their labors that caused the proliferation of the Baptists in the south and the growth of the Southern Baptist Convention.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon,  adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 01-02.

 

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