Tag Archives: revival

Revival


To many contemporary preachers and pastors, the word revival is anathama. Their mis-understanding of the word has caused them to revile the practice of old time Landmark Missionary Baptists and dis-continue the practice of having revivals. Bro. W.A. Dillard has nobly and exquisitely considered the the scriptures relating to, and the meaning of the word “revive.”

There is a true need for revival in this nation. It will come by prayer, passionate preaching, and repentance. The following is the article written so ably by Brother W.A. Dillard.

 

THINKING OF REVIVAL

Psalm 85:6: “Wilt thou not revive us again: that thy people may rejoice in thee?”
Isaiah 57:15: “For thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy; I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones.”
Hosea 14:7: “They that dwell under his shadow shall return; they shall revive as the corn, and grow as the vine: the scent thereof shall be as the wine of Lebanon.”
Habakkuk 3:2: “O Lord, I have heard thy speech, and was afraid: O Lord, revive thy work in the midst of the years, in the midst of the years make known; in wrath remember mercy.

Please notice and ponder the word “revive” as it appears in the context of the several verses above. The English word “revive” is a composite of “re” plus “vive” literally meaning “again to live.” It does not convey a loss of life then acquiring it all over again, but the stirring of that which one already possesses to produce such joy, peace, and appreciation of it as to make it the number one priority of one’s days.
The one Hebrew word translated “revive” in each of the verses above is “Chayah.” It means to possess life in all its awareness and attendant activities; to know life in zeal, and a high level of awareness, especially in spiritual things. This is the same root word that God used in the Hebrew language to reveal his name to Moses which is translated “I am.” Exo. 3:14. He is the source of life; and where there is life, there is activity.
The churches of the Lord Jesus Christ stand in need of a revival of proper activity! They do not need a revival of socialism or of bigger, more comfortable facilities, but a revival of joy, hope, and peace that flows from the Holy Word. I do not mean an acquiescence to the Word, rather a personal acquaintance with it, and agreement with its contents. From this flows all things right and holy in human life; hence, in the churches.
So, what shall we say of “revival” meetings? They are not just an intensification of formal worship services, but a dedication of life to the will of God, and to the working of the Holy Spirit within. That dedication is absolutely individual. It does not come from the will or decisions of the pastor; nor of the will or the majority vote of the congregation. It must be within the heart of each of us. It is true repentance toward God, and from the indifference of a backslidden condition. It is to allow ourselves to be enveloped without reservation in the teachings and work God has given to us that will produce the type of person He wants here on earth now as well as to rule with Him in the age that is about to happen. God, please give us unreserved submission to you that we may indeed know revival!!!

 

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80 – March 21 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Liberty on the Rise

The old court records of New England reveal the names of many Baptists who were constrained to pay taxes for the support of the Congregationalists.  One of those was Nathanael Green who was ordained as the pastor of the Baptist Church in Charlton, Mass. on Oct. 12, 1763.   That Congregation experienced many trials through the years, and at times spiritual depression was known as well as great spiritual revival.  In that Elder Green served until his death on March 21, 1791, it is apparent that the church endured the period of the Revolutionary War.  The pastor is spoken of as “being exemplary, “until he fell asleep in Jesus…”  But the public court record shows that Elder Green was arrested, taken to Worchester, imprisoned, and fined for refusing to pay the “ministers rate,” which we have mentioned before was for the care of the state preacher and his family.  The preacher was advised by Col. Chandler to pay the fine and after six hours he was released.  The pastor received a receipt for, “…sixteen shillings, nine pence, one farthing, being in full for his town and county rates for the year 1767: Benjamin Bond, Constable for the year 1767.”  The pastor sued on the basis that the law is to protect citizens against unscrupulous actions.  He won at the lower court, the assessors appealed and he won in the Superior Court.  The Man of God received all of his money and court costs back.  We should note that the sun of liberty in America was rising in those days.  Today it is just the opposite, when we go to court for the cause of liberty, the court rules for the state and against those that try to uphold freedom, and we have a Constitution, and they didn’t have its benefits yet. But we do have a “sin” problem.  “Righteousness exalteth a nation: but sin is a reproach to any people.”  [Pr 14:34]

Dr. Greg J. Dixon, adapted from: This Day in Baptist History III (David L. Cummins), pp, 166 – 167.

 

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67 – March 08 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Mr. Camp Meeting”

Evangelist Billy Kelly- The Prodigal Son – Singing on

Youtube

Billy Kelly from Olive Springs, Tennessee, born on April 17, 1932 was an evangelist that patterned his preaching style after Billy Sunday.  Brother Kelly, (known to us as “Machine gun Kelly”), was an interesting personality whose big frame peaked at 350 pounds or more.  Not only was he athletic, playing football and baseball at the Young High School in Knoxville, but he was musically talented, and well known for his fiddle playing and singing with a country band on radio and other places of entertainment.  Billy was saved on May 16, 1950, at the University of Tennessee in an area-wide revival meeting.  He was influential, and people were interested in the testimony he gave at the First Baptist Church on the following Sunday morning, and he was soon called to preach.  Billy was ordained on his twenty-third birthday.  Brother Billy, as he was called, was known as “Mr. Camp Meeting” and directed the Greer Baptist Camp Meeting in Greer, South Carolina, for twenty-two consecutive years. He preached, led singing, played the piano, sang special numbers, and was responsible for the grounds.  Almost single-handedly, he built a new tabernacle.  Billy was a very animated, popular speaker and turned down as many as 300 preaching requests a year.  One special event in his ministry was portraying a bootlegger in the film “Sheffey” produced by Unusual Films.  He met his Lord  on April 1, 1997.  It is estimated that 500 preachers attended his funeral on April 4 at Tabernacle Baptist Church in Greenville, South Carolina, where he and his wife Dorothy (Frost) Kelley attended and became members in February of 1961.

Dr. Dale R. Hart, adapted from: “This Day in Baptist History III” David L. Cummins. pp. 139  – 140

 

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26 – Jan. 26 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Newton experienced numerous seasons of revival
 Hanna Parker Grafton was married to Joseph Grafton on Jan. 26, 1835 as his third wife when he was 78 years old, just a year before his death on Dec. 16, 1836.  Joseph was born on June 9, 1757, in Newport, R.I.  His father was a mariner, his mother was a serious lady, intent on catechizing her children, but Joseph came into contact with his father’s naval friends, and soon picked up their vices.  When he reached his 18th birthday, an extensive revival prevailed in Providence.  The Lord was moving in both the Congregational and Baptist churches.  Joseph came under conviction and in time joined the Congregational church and was immersed because he was convinced that the scriptures taught this mode of baptism.  On Dec. 12, 1779 he was wed.  The deacons were convinced that he should preach but he was reluctant.  A set of trials caused him to reconsider.  In May of 1783 his oldest child died.  A few weeks later, his second child died also.  Soon his wife followed them to the grave yard.  He was still unconvinced.  In July of 1784 he was seized with a severe attack of bleeding from the lungs and their seemed little hope of recovery, but he gradually improved, and yielded to the Lord.  The Congregational church granted him a license to preach at Plainfield, CT., to a congregation of Separatists.  During that time his studies led him to become a Baptist and he was called to the First Baptist Church of Providence, R.I.  He later took a Baptist church in Newton, MA where he remained for fifty years.  He also founded the Newton Theological Institution.  Soon after going there, he married Mrs. Sally Robinson, a widow with seven children. The Baptist church in Newton experienced numerous seasons of revival during the ministry of Joseph Grafton.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins, pp. 53-54.

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23 – Jan. 23 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


His last words were, “SWEET HOME,”
 Charles Dutton Mallary was born in West Paultney, Rutland County, Vermont, on Jan. 23, 1801.  He had deeply pious parents, especially his mother.   He experienced the saving grace of Christ when he was sixteen during a revival.  He was immersed into the fellowship of the Baptist church in West Paultney, Clark Kendrick pastor, in June of 1822.  He graduated from Middlebury College in August 1817 and taught school for a year.  He became burdened to preach the gospel and relocated in Charleston, S.C. where he began preaching and became licensed by the local church, and in 1824 received a call to pastor the First Baptist Church of Columbia, S.C., where he was ordained.  On July 11, 1825 he married Miss Susan Mary Evans, the maternal granddaughter of the eminent preacher, Edmund Botsford.  Susan died in 1834.  He married again in 1840 to Mrs. Mary E. Welch.  After two years he moved 20 miles southeast to pastor Beulah and Congaree Baptist Churches.  In 1830 he accepted a call to the First Baptist Church in Augusta, GA.  In 1834 he went to a church in Milledgevillle, GA, but because of poor health, only stayed for two years.  At that point he began working with Mercer University where he served as agent from 1837-1839.  With a passion to preach he accepted the position as Missionary for the Central Association.  This was the most effective time of his ministry when he preached great revivals in the central area of Georgia.  From 1840 – 1864 he lived in Twiggs and Sumter Counties and resided in Jeffersonville for many years ministering in a number of churches until 1848 when he was called to the LaGrange church, until 1852.  He moved to Albany and because of poor health was unable to pastor but preached until the end in 1864 at the age of sixty-four. His last words were,  “SWEET HOME,” (clapping his hands).
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins, pp. 47-48.

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357 – Dec. 23 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


“A great revival resulted under his ministry”
 December 23, 1741 – John Waller was born in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, and was a descendent of the honorable Wallers in England. No man suffered more or experienced greater success in his ministry in Virginia and S.C. than he. His uncle had made arrangements for him to be educated in the law, but upon his death, his father was unable to finance even a classical education. Allowing himself to indulge in every type of wickedness and profanity, he quickly acquired the appellation of “Swearing Jack” Waller. He was sometimes called the “devils adjutant” to muster his troops. He was on the grand jury who was presented the case against the Baptist preacher, Lewis Craig and heard his testimony when he said, “I thank you for the honor…While I was wicked you took no notice of me: but since I have altered my course of life, and endeavored to reform my neighbors, you concern yourselves much about me. I forgive my persecuting enemies, and shall take joyfully the spoiling of my goods.” When Waller heard him speak in such a humble manner, he was persuaded that Craig was possessed of something he had not seen in him before and desired to have the same experience. Waller began to attend the Baptist meetings, and he experienced very intense conviction for seven or eight months. He said, “I had long felt the greatest abhorrence of myself.” In hearing another man cry out for mercy he felt his own heart melt, “…and a sweet application of the Redeemer’s love to my poor soul.” He said that there were periods of struggle…but he took refuge in the Word of God, especially in Isa. 50:10. He was ordained to the ministry in June of 1770 and it was attended with great success. A great revival resulted under his ministry and he had a membership of 1500.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 536-37

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350 – Dec. 16 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Revival came and spread in the land.
 December 16, 1769 – Jesse Mercer – Was born in Halifax County, North Carolina. According to William Cathcart, in his time, “He was the most influential Baptist minister in the State of Georgia.” He was the oldest child of the Rev. Silas Mercer, and his young life was circumspect in every regard, but at the age of 15, he saw himself as a sinner and was converted. In his 17th year he was baptized and united with the Phillips’ Mill Church. In his 19th year he was married, and before he was 20, he was ordained into the ministry and began his fruitful work for the Lord.
For over 50 years he served the Lord as pastor, but he traveled extensively preaching the gospel to the spiritually impoverished in sparsely settled areas of the state. He was influenced by Luther Rice and became a strong advocate of missions among the slaves, promoted the Sunday school movement, and led in the efforts of the temperance movement. He served as a trustee of the Columbian College in Washington, D.C.  He served as clerk of the Georgia Baptist Association for 21 years, and as moderator for 23 years. He was President of the Georgia Baptist Convention for 19 years, from its founding in 1822 until 1841. He also published The Christian Index. His wife died on the way home where he preached at the Triennial Convention in 1826 and the following year he married Nancy Simons, a wealthy widow, and together they became generous donors to the cause of Christ. Though he was granted a doctorate from Brown University in 1835 he preferred not to be called by that title but they called him “Brother” and his friends called him “Father.” On returning from a revival where there was a great outpouring he stood before his people and said with tears, “You are too good to be saved!” Revival came and spread in the land.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 524-26.

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344 – Dec. 10 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


They filled the jails, but their churches just kept growing.
 December 10, 1769 – Dutton Lane founded the Nottoway Baptist Church in Virginia. This church ultimately founded many others. Lane was born Nov. 7 near Baltimore, MD, the same year that George Washington was born – 1732. It is not known when Dutton’s father moved the family to Virginia near the N.C. line. Soon after Shubal Stearns and Daniel Marshall established the Sandy Creek church in N.C. they entered Virginia where they preached the gospel and baptized believers among whom was Dutton Lane. A revival followed, and elder Marshall baptized forty-two persons at one time. It was nothing until Lane was preaching, and Samuel Harriss, a man of distinction in that area, was converted. People far and wide began requesting someone to come preach to them, even as far as Culpeper and Spotsylvania Counties. In August of 1760 the first Separate Baptist church in Virginia was organized at Dan River. Lane became its pastor, and by 1772 he had established five different preaching stations with five assistants. The success of the Baptists brought the wrath of Satan down upon them. The hand of the Lord was revealed as James Roberts was going for a warrant in 1769 against Richard Elkins (one of Lanes Assistants). They said that a bright light shone about them so much that their horses squatted on the ground succeeded by such thick darkness that they could not see. Roberts concluded that it was a warning to him to stop being “an opposer.” Dutton’s own father threatened to murder him until his wife persuaded him to listen to him preach which he did, got saved, and his own son baptized his father that was going to kill him. Nothing would nor could stop these preaching men in Virginia. They filled the jails, but their churches just kept growing.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 515-17.

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History of Our Capital


http://video.staged.com/preacher/us_capitol_tour_with_david_barton

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