Tag Archives: religious

BALANCE: DIFFICULT, BUT NOT IMPOSSIBLE!


William Andrew Dillard

A few years ago, while visiting in San Diego, California, a strange site appeared at the edge of the bay. There were these irregular rocks of various size and shape balanced to create numerous single poles. To say the site arrested attention is an understatement. How can this be?
It was then that I noticed the artist responsible for the phenomenon. While watching him busily engrossed in his creations, he paused to invite me to create a similar pole. With one rock stacked in balance upon the first one, all else failed. No matter how many times it was tried, the balance simply was not there. My immediate response was that there was a trick to it; that these particular rocks I was working with could not be so balanced to create a standing pole. The artist smiled, picked up my rocks and began balancing them one upon another to create the pole. I still do not understand how he could determine the exact center of gravity that allowed the rock to be in such perfect balance.
The reality of that strange encounter illustrates another form of balance so much more important. It is the balance of life that God calls upon His people to live, a life of righteousness in a world dominated by sin, personally, locally, nationally, and internationally. It seems the very moment one feels he is really accomplishing that balance, up jumps the devil, and once more the stark realization that we are still sinners is blatantly announced.
Once there was a ruler whose life failed miserably to measure up to that calling. His name was Belshazzar, the last king of the world empire of Babylonia. The words of his judgment were “Mene, Mene, Tekel Upharsin” which translates, “Your kingdom is numbered and finished, You are weighed in the balances and found wanting.” Immediately he was slain and the kingdom passed into the hands of the Medes-Persians.
The balance of life God requires cannot be understood nor accomplished at all by carnal minded men. But the good news is that it is both understood and accomplished by faith in Christ Jesus, in His person, words, and works by our repentance from sin, placing faith in Him. Is it difficult? To the unrepentant, it is impossible! Is it attainable? Indeed it is, not by just one person here and there, but by everyone who lives life in Christ. In that balance the believer is not imputed with sin, as Paul wrote to the Romans in 4:7-8, “Saying, Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered. Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin.” That, my friends, is the perfect, spiritual balance of life bringing the zenith of enjoyment and peace both here and hereafter. How is your balance?

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My Business


It’s my business

to do God’s business

and it’s God’s business

to take care of my business.

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LISTS


On our list of activities in life:

There are some things we need

to eliminate,

some things we need to delegate,

and the rest we need

to dedicate.

Adrian Rogers

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Have I Done My Best for Jesus?


The following is adapted from Alfred Smith’s Treasury of Hymn Stories and other sourcesThe account by Smith said Ed Spencer was an Olympic gold medal winner, but this was not possible since the modern Olympic games did not begin until 1896.

__________


Edward Spencer was a student at Garrett Biblical Institute in Evanston, Illinois, on Lake Michigan.

On the morning of September 8, 1860, Ed heard the news that the Lady Elgin, an overloaded steamship, had collided with the lumber-hauling schooner Augusta, and had sunk. People were drowning, and nothing could be done because of the heavy waves and strong currents. 

Ed ran to the shores of the lake and saw that the situation was indeed serious. People were floating on pieces of wreckage in the waters, close enough to shore for their cries of help to be heard, but unable to swim to safety. 

Without hesitation, Ed stripped himself of excess clothing and dove into the rolling waves. He was able to reach the first person, a woman who had clung to a piece of wreckage for hours and was totally exhausted, and bring her to shore. He later said, “Then the struggle began, the huge breakers forcing us towards the shore, keeping us buried much of the time, and the strong undertow tending to carry us back out into the lake. It was a struggle indeed, and I was gaining but little when two tall, stout biblical students, to whom I had signaled, came to our relief” (cited from Josiah Currey, Chicago: Its History and Its Builders).

He repeated this heroic act several more times before onlookers and friends began to say, “Ed, you’ve got to stop. You’ve done all you can. You’ll kill yourself if you keep going!” Ed did not hesitate. He replied, “I’ve got to do my best,” and plunged again into the water. On one trip he was hit in the head and injured by a piece of wreckage.

Ed rescued 17 people in 16 trips in that pitching, rolling storm. After the 16th trip he collapsed unconscious on the shore, unable to go on. He lay there repeating, “Have I done my best fellows? Have I done my best?” All night he battled for his life in the infirmary, continually repeating, “Have I done my best fellows? Have I done my best?”

Ed Spencer had done his best, but it cost him his health. He lived the rest of his life as a semi-invalid due to injuries sustained during the rescue. It was in Phoenix, Arizona, in a humble cottage, that Ensign Edwin Young found him. Mr. Young, Dean of the School of Music at Hardin-Simmons University, had heard his story and heard that he could be found in Arizona. He found a man no longer a robust athlete, but a shadow of the strong man he once was.

During the course of their visit, Mr. Young commended him for his heroic action and asked how he had been recognized during his life by the people who’s lives he had saved that day. With tears streaming down the invalid’s cheeks, he replied, “Not one ever came back to even say thank you.”
It was the retelling of this story that led Ensign Edwin Young to write, “Have I Done My Best for Jesus?”

I wonder have I done my best for Jesus,
Who died upon the cruel tree?
To think of His great sacrifice at Calvary!
I know my Lord expects the best from me.

How many are the lost that I have lifted?
How many are the chained I’ve helped to free?
I wonder, have I done my best for Jesus,
When He has done so much for me?

The hours that I have wasted are so many
The hours I’ve spent for Christ so few;
Because of all my lack of love for Jesus,
I wonder if His heart is breaking too.

I wonder have I cared enough for others,
Or have I let them die alone?
I might have helped a wand’rer to the Saviour,
The seed of precious Life I might have sown.

No longer will I stay within the valley
I’ll climb to mountain heights above;
The world is dying now for want of someone
To tell them of the Saviour’s matchless love.

How many are the lost that I have lifted?
How many are the chained I’ve helped to free?
I wonder, have I done my best for Jesus,
When He has done so much for me?

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Sin


Sin is the dare of God’s justice,

the rape of His mercy,

the jeer of His patience,

the slight of His Power,

and the contempt

of His love.

John Bunyan

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God’s Work


God’s work, done in God’s way, will never ever want for God’s provision or God’s protection. – Adrian Rogers

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IN THE BEGINNING


Professor John Lennox

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Serve


There is no cheap, easy, or lazy way to serve God.

Adrian Rogers

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BAPTISM OR BAPTISMS


William Andrew Dillard

In expressing the unity of the faith, Paul told the Ephesians, “One Lord, one faith, one baptism…” Eph. 4:5. But. one reads in the scriptures about the baptism of the Spirit, water baptism of believers in Jesus, and the suffering of Jesus is referred to as a baptism. So just what does it mean to say “one baptism?” 
The word “baptism” comes from the Greek word “baptizo” which mean to dip or plunge. It is consistently referred to as a total inundation so much so that it is also portrayed as a burial. There is a sense that anything one may immerse himself in could be called a baptism. This is how it is used with reference to the suffering of Jesus. He would be immersed in pain and suffering.
However, the mainstream, biblical context of the word references water baptism of a professed believer by the authority of a New Testament Church. The other main reference using that word is the baptism of the Holy Spirit that came upon the church on the day called Pentecost. So, how then is it to be referenced as one?
Some would have you believe that only Spirit baptism is important and that occurs in the minute of one’s spiritual salvation. Not so! That line is pure universal church heresy.
Still others would have you believe that Holy Spirit baptism can only occur AFTER water baptism, and that upon the select few who diligently implore the Holy Spirit to so accommodate them. Not so! That is pure holy roller heresy!
The truth of the matter is settled in long ago typology in the Old Testament. When the Hebrews were freed from Egyptian slavery, they came out after applying the blood of the Passover Lamb. Then they were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea. Did you catch that? IN THE CLOUD AND IN THE SEA. It was a simultaneous thing. Baptism is an immersion in water. A cloud is water even though it was a manifestation of the Spirit of God. The Hebrews were completely immersed with walls of water about them and the cloud of water even the Spirit of God over and about them.
Today when a professed believer is scripturally baptized, it is in water, but he is baptized to fellowship in the New Covenant, the practical expression of which is the New Testament Church where the baptism of the Holy Spirit still abides since Pentecost in special office work. By this the obedient believer is enabled to be led to spiritual maturity. So, it all occurs at once, as the scriptures plainly state: “….one lord, one faith, one baptism.” Scriptural baptism last forever, it can never be repeated.

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Worship


Worship is an attitude of the heart where we become so full it overflows us and splashes on others.

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