Tag Archives: Presbyterian church

180 — June 28 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Jewett-Milo

 

The Pastor Who Couldn’t Ignore Immersion

 

Milo P. Jewett was born in Johnsbury, Vermont, on April 27, 1808, into the family of Dr. and Mrs. Calvin Jewett. Being the son of a medical doctor, young Jewett was offered the opportunity of a fine education and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1828. Looking forward to a career in the legal profession, Jewett spent a year in a law office in New Hampshire, but in 1830 he abandoned law and entered Andover Seminary. His brilliant mind fully equipped him for the field of education, and “he decided that teaching and not preaching was the work for which God had fitted him…In 1834 (he) accepted a professorship in Marietta College, Marietta, Ohio.”

 

Professor Jewett was persuaded to accept the pastorate of a Presbyterian church along with his educational duties, and for two years he served as pastor-professor. A disturbing situation developed which changed Jewett’s life, and that we might hear it in his own words, we quote from a letter he wrote from Marietta College, dated June 28, 1838:

 

Perhaps you know I have preached for about two years past to a Presbyterian church in the country. Some eighteen months ago, an elder of that church became a Baptist. On the occasion of his baptism, a sermon was preached by Rev. Hiram Gear, the Baptist minister in Marietta. This sermon disturbed several members of my church, and the session requested me to preach on baptism. . . . .

 

Afterwards I took up infant baptism; and here I found myself in clouds and darkness…I would lay down the subject for weeks, then resume it, till, some three or four months ago, I was obliged, in the fear of God, to conclude that none but believers in Jesus have a right to the ordinance of Jesus.

 

In January 1839 Jewett was baptized and united with the Baptist church in Marietta.

 

In 1840 he authored Jewett on Baptism, and the volume was blessed by the Lord in helping many to see the spiritual truth of the ordinance. Jewett passed into the Lord’s presence in 1882 after a full life of spiritual obedience and service.

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart: from This Day in Baptist History Vol. I. (Thompson/Cummins) pp. 261 – 262.

 

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179 — June 28 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Milo P. Jewett

 

The Pastor Who Couldn’t Ignore Immersion  

 

 

Milo P. Jewett was born in Johnsbury, Vermont, on April 27, 1808, into the family of Dr. and Mrs. Calvin Jewett. Being the son of a medical doctor, young Jewett was offered the opportunity of a fine education and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1828. Looking forward to a career in the legal profession, Jewett spent a year in a law office in New Hampshire, but in 1830 he abandoned law and entered Andover Seminary. His brilliant mind fully equipped him for the field of education, and “he decided that teaching and not preaching was the work for which God had fitted him…In 1834 (he) accepted a professorship in Marietta College, Marietta, Ohio.”

 

Professor Jewett was persuaded to accept the pastorate of a Presbyterian church along with his educational duties, and for two years he served as pastor-professor. A disturbing situation developed which changed Jewett’s life, and that we might hear it in his own words, we quote from a letter he wrote from Marietta College, dated June 28, 1838:

 

Perhaps you know I have preached for about two years past to a Presbyterian church in the country. Some eighteen months ago, an elder of that church became a Baptist. On the occasion of his baptism, a sermon was preached by Rev. Hiram Gear, the Baptist minister in Marietta. This sermon disturbed several members of my church, and the session requested me to preach on baptism. . . . .

 

Afterwards I took up infant baptism; and here I found myself in clouds and darkness…I would lay down the subject for weeks, then resume it, till, some three or four months ago, I was obliged, in the fear of God, to conclude that none but believers in Jesus have a right to the ordinance of Jesus.

 

In January 1839 Jewett was baptized and united with the Baptist church in Marietta.

 

In 1840 he authored Jewett on Baptism, and the volume was blessed by the Lord in helping many to see the spiritual truth of the ordinance. Jewett passed into the Lord’s presence in 1882 after a full life of spiritual obedience and service.

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I. (Thompson/Cummins) pp. 261 – 262.

 

 

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83 – March 24 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


He Chose Local Church Evangelism

Fred Brown was born in Birmingham, Alabama, on August 23, 1909, one of nine children.  Those were days when the gospel was preached in all the major denominations in the South.   It was a protracted meeting in an old-fashioned Presbyterian church that Fred, as a seven year old, heard a message on hell, and trusted Christ as his Savior.  Even though he was gifted athletically, he turned down a football scholarship to Birmingham Southern College and followed the Lord’s leading to a new College in Panama City, Florida called Bob Jones College headed up by Dr. Bob Jones, Sr., a great evangelist.  Fred’s classmates also became household names in evangelism, Monroe Parker and Jimmy Johnson.  It was during the great depression but the Lord always provided their school bills.  At one point Fred and Jimmy were placed on trial by the Methodist Church for preaching without an official commission from the Methodist Church and were defended in Court by Bob Jones, Sr.  In 1934 Jimmy and Fred were invited to preach the gospel in Ireland.  Brown would preach the gospel in twenty foreign lands.  While in College, Fred met and married Donella Cochran on Aug. 7, 1938.  They left immediately for a one year honeymoon/evangelistic tour in Ireland.  In the 61 years after his graduation Fred preached in nearly every state across America opting for local church meetings rather than city-wide crusades.   He made his home base at the Highland Park Baptist Church in Chattanooga, Tenn. where he served as board of Trustees and his wife chaired the music Department at the University and coordinated the music program at the church.  Mrs. Brown died on March 24, 1983.  Dr. Brown had several additional years of service before he passed into the presence of the Lord on Sept. 6, 1992.

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon, adapted from: This Day in Baptist History III (David L. Cummins), pp. 172 – 174.

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