Tag Archives: preachers

ANOTHER FOREMAN’S FABLE


ANOTHER FOREMAN’S FABLE

Parson to Person

William Andrew Dillard

The appearances and effects of sin in human life are myriad. In fact, Every bad thing in the universe of mankind is attributable directly or indirectly to sin. This is apparent in domestic disputes and their ultimate fruitions. Such is also the cause of unkind words and deeds directed toward brethren of the same faith and practice. (Biting and devouring is how the Bible puts it.)

Addressing this issue in another of his classes: Ministerial Practicalities, Dr. L. D. Foreman, former President of Missionary Baptist Seminary in Little Rock, Arkansas shared yet another of his well thought out and grounded fables for his students to seriously consider. He said, “Students, all of you have witnessed a big dog trotting down the street. The dog has a destination in mind and continues steadily toward it. However, as he progresses down the street, every little dog on the block will come out to bark at him. Now if the big dog is distracted enough to stop and bark back at every little dog that barks at him, he will never reach his destination. Consequently, he ignores the little dogs and their barking, and continues his journey.”

Foreman went on to make practical application which by this time had become obvious. Any devoted follower of Jesus will not be treated better that was Jesus in His ministry. He will be controversial on the basis of Bible convictions, and he will attract the attention of a number of “little dogs” who come out to bark. Like the literal big dog, the minister must know who he is, what he is about, and where he is going. With those things settled in place, it is very unwise to stop and bark back at those who cast objections, however frivolous those objections may be. The object is not to debate one another, but to serve the Master by carrying out his holy Will for your life.

Of course, it remains that there are those whose thrill of life, and apparent calling (not of God) is to object to everything, however holy, that may rub against their self-imposed comfort zone. Because this is true, one must determine early on to be on a mission, or to bark at everyone else who is.

Leave a comment

Filed under Commentary, Uncategorized

Jonathan Edwards, born October 5, 1703


Jonathan Edwards, born October 5, 1703

Jonathan Edwards

American Minute with Bill Federer

He entered Yale College at age 13 and graduated with honors.

He became a pastor, and his sermon, “Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God,” started The Great Awakening Revival.

His name was Jonathan Edwards, born OCTOBER 5, 1703.

The Great Awakening Revival can be traced back to earlier revivals in Scotland, and to Scottish Rev. William Tennent’s Log College in Pennsylvania.

The fiery Dutch Reformed minister Theodore Frelinghuysen preached divine outpourings of the Holy Spirit and conversion.

The revival spread across America through the preaching of George Whitefield, Gilbert Tennent, Samuel Finley and others, inadvertently uniting the Colonies prior to the Revolutionary War.

Calvinist denominations split between traditionalist “Old Lights” emphasizing ritual, and revivalist “New Lights” emphasizing personal commitment.

The Great Awakening Revival was part of the Pietist movement in Lutheran Churches, it reshaped Presbyterian and Dutch Reformed Churches, and it strengthened evangelical Baptist and Methodist Anglican Churches.

The Revival inspired the founding of universities, such as: Princeton, Brown, Dartmouth, Rutgers and Columbia.

The Revival brought large numbers of African slaves to Christianity, being led by Presbyterian preacher Samuel Davies, who later became Princeton’s fourth president.

Blacks were welcomed into active roles in white congregations, even as preachers.

The first black Baptist churches were founded in Virginia, South Carolina and Georgia.

The Great Awakening Revival had a profound effect, as noted by Sarah Pierrepont Edwards, wife of Jonathan Edwards, who wrote to her brother in New Haven of George Whitefield’s preaching:

“It is wonderful to see what a spell he casts over an audience by proclaiming the simplest truths of the Bible…

Our mechanics shut up their shops, and the day laborers throw down their tools to go and hear him preach, and few return unaffected.”

Ben Franklin wrote of Whitefield:

“Multitudes of all denominations attended his sermons…

It was wonderful to see the change soon made in the manners of our inhabitants.

From being thoughtless or indifferent about religion, it seemed as if all the world were growing religious, so that one could not walk thro’ the town in an evening without hearing psalms sung in different families of every street.”

In his “Narrative of the Surprizing Word of God in the Conversion of Many Hundred Souls,” Jonathan Edwards wrote:

“And then it was, in the latter part of December, that the Spirit of God began extraordinarily to…work amongst us.

There were, very suddenly, one after another, five or six persons who were, to all appearance, savingly converted, and some of them wrought upon in a very remarkable manner.

Particularly I was surprised with the relation of a young woman, who had been one of the greatest company-keepers in the whole town.

When she came to me, I had never heard that she was become in any ways serious, but by the conversation I had with her, it appeared to me that what she gave an account of was a glorious work of God’s infinite power and sovereign grace, and that God had given her a new heart, truly broken and sanctified….

God made it, I suppose, the greatest occasion of awakening to others, of anything that ever came to pass in the town…”

Jonathan Edwards continued:

“I have had abundant opportunity to know the effect it had, by my private conversation with many.

The news of it seemed to be almost like a flash of lighting upon the hearts of young people all over the town, and upon many others….

Presently upon this, a great and earnest concern about the great things of religion and the eternal world became universal in all parts of the town and among persons of all degrees and all ages.

The noise of the dry bones waxed louder and louder….

Those that were wont to be the vainest and loosest, and those that had been the most disposed to think and speak slightly of vital and experimental religion, were not generally subject to great awakenings…”

Jonathan Edwards added:

“And the work of conversion was carried on in a most astonishing manner and increased more and more; souls did, as it were, come by flocks to Jesus Christ….

This work of God, as it was carried on and the number of true saints multiplied, soon made a glorious alteration in the town, so that in the spring and summer following, Anno 1735, the town seemed to be full of the presence of God.

It never was so full of love, nor so full of joy…there were remarkable tokens of God’s presence in almost every house.

It was a time of joy in families on the account of salvation’s being brought unto them, parents rejoicing over their children as new born, and husbands over their wives, and wives over their husbands.

The goings of God were then seen in His sanctuary, God’s day was a delight and His tabernacles were amiable…”

Jonathan Edwards went on:

“Our public assembles were then beautiful; the congregation was alive in God’s service, everyone earnestly intent on the public worship, every hearer eager to drink the words of the minister as they came from his mouth.

The assembly in general were, from time to time, in tears while the word was preached, some weeping with sorrow and distress, others with joy and love, others with pity and concern for their neighbors.

There were many instances of persons that came from abroad, on visits or on business…that partook of that shower of divine blessing that God rained down here and went home rejoicing.

Till at length the same work began to appear and prevail in several other towns in the country…”

Jonathan Edwards concluded:

“In the month of March, the people of South Hadley began to be seized with a deep concern about the things of religion, which very soon became universal…

About the same time, it began to break forth in the west part of Suffield… and it soon spread into all parts of the town. It next appeared at Sunderland…

About the same time it began to appear in a part of Deerfield… Hatfield… West Springfield… Long Meadow… Endfield… Westfield… Northfield…

In every place, God brought His saving blessings with Him, and His Word, attended with Spirit…returned not void.”

Jonathan Edwards stated:

“There is no leveler like Christianity, but it levels by lifting all who receive it to the lofty table-land of a true character and of undying hope both for this world and the next.”

Jonathan and Sarah Edwards’ emphasis on training their children in godly values had a ripple effect. A.E. Winship’s A Study in Education and Heredity (1900) listed among their descendants:

1 U.S. Vice-President,
3 U.S. Senators,
3 governors,
3 mayors,
13 college presidents,
30 judges,
65 professors,
80 public office holders,
100 lawyers and
100 missionaries.

A.E. Winship’s study also examined a family known as “Jukes.”

In 1877, while visiting New York’s prisons, Richard Dugdale found inmates with 42 different last names all descending from one man, called “Max.”

Born around 1720 of Dutch stock, Max was a hard drinker, idle, irreverent and uneducated.

Max’s descendants included:

7 murderers,
60 thieves,
50 women of debauchery,
130 other convicts.
310 paupers, who, combined spent 2,300 years in poorhouses, and
400 physically wrecked by indulgent living.

The “Jukes” descendants cost the state more than $1,250,000.

Jonathan Edwards stated:

“I have reason to hope that my parents’ prayers for me have been, in many things, very powerful and prevalent, that God has…taken me under His care and guidance, provision and direction, in answer to their prayers.”

In A History of the Work of Redemption, 1739, Jonathan Edwards wrote:

“Those mighty kingdoms of Antichrist and Mohammed…have trampled the world under foot..(and) swallowed up the Ancient Roman Empire…

Satan’s Mohometan kingdom swallowing up the Eastern Empire.”

In his work, The Latter-Day Glory Is Probably to Begin in America, Jonathan Edwards proposed that the since the Old World had hosted Christ’s first coming, the New World would be given the honor of preparing the earth for His second coming.

The thought that the “Sun of Righteousness” traveled from East to West contributed to the concept that America had a “Manifest Destiny”:

“When the time comes of the church’s deliverance from her enemies, so often typified by the Assyrians, the light will rise in the west, till it shines through the world like the sun in its meridian brightness…

And if we may suppose that this glorious work of God shall begin in any part of America, I think, if we consider the circumstances of the settlement of New England, it must needs appear the most likely, of all American colonies, to be the place whence this work shall principally take its rise.”

Jonathan Edwards, who became President of Princeton College, resolved:

“Never to do anything which I should be afraid to do if it were the last hour of my life.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

Leave a comment

Filed under History

Power in the Word


 

Hebrews 4:12

 

“For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart” Hebrews 4:12.

Now and again a thorough cleaning of the heart does us good.

Psychologists and those in the mental health field say that denial can be the stumbling block to overcoming harmful habits. Denial often keeps us from becoming our personal best. Christians are no different. We should know better, but because we are human, we suffer the same faults and failures as unbelievers. Each of us needs God’s Word to clean out our dark thoughts and reveal to us the true intent of our hearts.

For this reason, Bible preachers and teachers are relevant to a healthy society and to a healthy church. When pastors and teachers obey the Holy Spirit and preach thus saith the Word of God, He can sweep the corners of our minds and hearts and alert us to the sins we may deny and conceal from others. For this reason, they should preach unapologetically God’s message to sinners and saints alike for the hearer’s good and His glory.

In the past, the people of Israel did not always appreciate the prophet’s message from God, but they needed to hear and heed it, if not for themselves, for the next generation’s benefit.

 

REFLECTION

Lord, thank You, for sweeping through my thoughts and the intents of my heart, and revealing every thing I was denying. Heavenly Father, as You revealed my sins, You also promised not to leave me in my sins and to be my strong help in my time of need.

Beverly Barnett

 

2 Comments

Filed under Inspirational

72 – March – 13 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

Beale Memorial Baptist

 Today

The issue was the Lordship of Christ

1774 – The Piscataway Baptist Church, located seven miles southwest of Tappahannock, Virginia, was founded, and on the same day a warrant was issued to arrest all the Baptist preachers at the meeting.  John Waller, John Shackleford, Robert Ware, and Ivison Lewis were taken before a magistrate.  Lewis was released because it could not be proved that he actually preached.  The others were sent to prison.  During their time there they preached twice per week, gave godly advice, read the scriptures, and prayed almost without ceasing.  John Waller in his journal wrote that they passed through various fiery trials, their minds being harassed by the enemy of souls.  The actual record has been preserved in the court record of the Essex County, VA, records book for the twenty-first of March, in the year of our Lord 1774.  The charge was, “for preaching and expounding the Scriptures contrary to law, and confessing the fact…”  Ware and Shackleford gave security (bond) and were released.  Waller was always doubtful about giving bond and was determined to go back to jail which he did and spent fourteen days with a bunch of drunken and profane rowdies.  He felt deserted by his brethren and scoffed and persecuted by his enemies.  He finally gave consent and bonded out.  The old brick courthouse building where those men were arraigned as lawbreakers is still standing on U.S. Route 17 in Tappahannock, and is now a Baptist church.  The members of the Centennial Baptist Church bought the old courthouse and used it as a house of worship.  The church changed its name in 1908 to Beale Memorial Baptist Church after Pastor Frank B. Beal who served as pastor for twenty-eight years.  This 234 year old church may be the oldest Baptist church in America.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, pp. 103.

The post 72 – March – 13 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

 

1 Comment

Filed under Church History

04 – January 04 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

Seven preachers in jail

 

1771 – William Webber and Joseph Anthony of Virginia as Paul the Apostle were familiar with the inside of crude prisons. Few men in Virginia suffered more persecution than Webber. He was seized in Chesterfield County, Dec. 7, 1770, and imprisoned in the county jail until March 7, 1771. When the two men crossed the James River into Chesterfield County, there was not a Baptist in the entire county. The magistrates, finding that many were turning to righteousness (to madness, as they would state it)…issued warrants and had them apprehended and cast into prison. The order book of Chesterfield County, No. 4, page 489, Jan. 4, 1771, records that they were brought into court on a warrant for misbehavior for itinerant preaching…being of the sect commonly called Anabaptists. They were fined 150 pounds each and told not to return to the county for the space of one year. At one time there were seven Baptist preachers confined in the Chesterfield County jail. Webber and Anthony preached twice per week. Large congregations gathered to hear them as they preached through the grates of the prison. There were times of great revival and scores of conversions of souls turning to Christ under those windows. Baptist principles were largely advertised in Chesterfield County at the expense of the state.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 05-06.

 

The post 04 – January 04 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under Church History

199 – July, 18 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The importance of a godly wife

 

Only eternity can reward the wives of the great preachers of the past such as the godly wife of Benjamin Keach, who at 28 years of age, was called to pastor the Baptist church at Horsleydown London in 1668. This holy lady, who had borne him five children in ten years, died in 1670, and Keach wrote a poem in her memory entitled “A Pillar Set Up.” In this poem he gave her a very great and noble character, commending her for her zeal for the truth, sincerity in religion, uncommon love to the saints, and her content in whatsoever condition of life God was pleased to bring her to. He particularly observes, how great an help, and comfort, she was to him in his suffering for the cause of Christ, visiting, and taking all possible care of him while in prison, instead of tempting him to use any means for delivery out of his troubles, encouraging him to go on, and counting it an honor done them both, in that they were called to suffer for the sake of Christ. He also said that some acknowledged that, that their conversion to God was thro’ the conversation they had with her.” Two years after her death, he married a widow of extraordinary piety with whom he lived thirty-two years. Susanna Partridge bore him five daughters, the youngest of whom married Thomas Crosby, a renowned Baptist historian. After the death of Keach, she lived with her daughter and son-in-law, and Crosby wrote of her, “She lived with me…the last twenty years of her life. I must say, that she walked before God in truth, and with a perfect heart, and did that which was good in His sight. She lived in peace, without spot and blameless.” Many godly wives saw their husbands pilloried, imprisoned, and treated roughly, and the encouragement of these women provided the strength that kept them strong.  Keach died July 18, 1704.  Joseph Stennett preached from, “I know whom I have believed.

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: adapted From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 294-95.

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under Church History

178 — June 26 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

A Fearless Ambassador of Christ

 

I. B. Kimbrough was born in Tennessee in 1826.  While ministering in Tennessee, Kimbrough at one time served as the financial agent of Carson and Newman College and traveled extensively in his state attempting to raise money with which to train young Baptist preachers.

 

On June 26, 1886, at Waco, Texas.  Dr. Kimbrough recalled an incident from his days in Tennessee and his work with Carson and Newman College. As he was traveling from one appointment to another through a secluded forest, he was confronted by two highwaymen. Holding their guns on the man of God, they insisted that he dismount from his horse and hand over all his money.

 

Very well, gentlemen, please give me a little time, and I will obey your orders.” Kimbrough responded. After dismounting, he laid his money in two piles, then turning to the highwaymen he said: “Gentlemen, this small pile of money is mine: you are at liberty to rob me of that; the larger pile is God’s money, and I dare you to touch it. I collected it for the young preachers of the state who are struggling for an education at Carson and Newman College.”

 

The earnestness and courage of the man attracted the attention of the robbers, and they began to inquire into the work in which he was engaged. He told them he was a Baptist preacher and explained to them his mission. After hearing what he had to say, the elder of the two men said:

 

“We will not take either your money or the money of the young preachers.”
Turning to the young men, and looking them full in the face, Dr. Kimbrough added: “Young men, you are in a mighty bad business. I believe you ought to give it up. In the meantime, I will be grateful if you will help me in the work in which I am engaged.”

 

Following this appeal, the robbers gave him $5 each for the young preachers, whereupon the faithful minister mounted his horse, and all rode away, going in different directions.

 

I. B. Kimbrough was a fearless ambassador of Jesus Christ!

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I. (Thompson/Cummins) pp. 261 – 262.

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under Church History

Baptist History


A Brief Ministry in Violent Times

Caroline County Ct. House Built 1803-09

Daniel Fristoe was one of a number of effective preachers who were called under the preaching of David Thomas. He was a product of the ministry of the Chappawamsick Church around which swirled controversy and violence from certain citizens in Stafford and Prince William Counties, Virginia.

On June 14, 1771 Fristoe was ordained to the regular work of the ministry, one day after John young was haled into court in Caroline County for preaching without a license.  According to Fristoe’s diary, the day following his ordination he met with the brethren in Fauquier County where they examined some candidates for baptism. 16 persons were adjudged proper subjects for baptism. The next day being Sunday about two thousand people came together. After the preaching, thirteen others were examined and deemed worthy of baptism. Fristoe baptized twenty-nine people before this great multitude.

While in Philadelphia as a messenger Fristoe was seized with the smallpox, from which he never recovered. He died far from home in the thirty-fifth year of his life.

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History. Vol. I (Thompson/Cummins) pp. 244-245.

 

2 Comments

Filed under Church History

63 – March 04 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


The Heroine of Burma

Four preachers gathered at the grave site in March of 2004 where they were rewarded for their efforts.  Two Americans and two Burman men had made the trip-all intent on finding the place where the remains of Ann Judson had been laid to rest.  Ann had originally been buried under a Hopia tree near the waters of a Bay in the Indian Ocean, but with the incursion of the waters, it had been necessary to disinter her body and bury it a bit further inland.  They were still in sight of the ocean, and they stood there in silence as they thought of the faithfulness of their Heroine-Ann of Ava-and her years of devoted service.  A national had written: Though Ann’s thirteen years in Burma exceeded the average for those early days, her death, when prospects looked so promising, was a great loss to the growing church.

Thirteen years . . . . .  which must have seemed an eternity crowded into that short period of time.  Adoniram and Ann were two and a half years away from home before they received their first letter from the homeland!  The first home letter was laid in their hands, and after three years of waiting, came the assurance that the Baptist churches of America had accepted the Judson’s as their first missionaries and assumed responsibility for their support.

When the hour of her departure from this life came, Ann’s mate was away serving the Lord.  As the dusk settled upon the scene, Ann’s spirit soared into the brightness of an eternal dawn.  Some weeks later her broken-hearted husband returned.

Dr. Dale R. Hart, adapted from:  “This Day in Baptist History III”  David L. Cummins. pp. 131 – 132

Leave a comment

Filed under Church History

TORREY TALKING TREMENDOUSLY


R. G. Lee
Quoting Torrey
Torrey Talking Tremendously

“What we need more than anything else is a baptism with fire on the preachers, a baptism with fire on the deacons, a baptism with fire on the choir, a baptism with fire on the Sunday-school teachers, a baptism with fire upon young men and young women.”

“The doctrine of evolution is absolutely unproved. There is not a single proof of the hypothesis of evolution. Development of varieties there has been, but of evolution of a higher species from a lower not one single case. The hypothesis of the evolution of species, of the highest form of life from the lowest, is a guess pure and simple, without one scientifically observed fact to build upon.”

“If the Bible is not true, we have no proof that God is love.”

“There is an awful risk in delay.”

“Irrational and absurd are all the excuses that men make for not coming to Christ.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized