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95 – April – 05 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Not many noble are called”
1878 – Dr. William H. Brisbane, nobleman preacher of the gospel, died on this date.  Paul said, “…not many noble are called.”  Someone has said, “thankfully that ‘m’ is not an ‘a’ for ‘any’ or there would have been none of the upper class that would enter the kingdom.  It may be difficult but not impossible.  The Lord Jesus said, “With men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible.”  (Mt 19:26).  Brisbane was born into aristocracy near Charleston, S.C. and became an heir to great wealth and position.  His early education was with the Roman Catholic, Bishop England and later with Rev. William Brantley, president of Beaufort College.  When but fifteen he was sent to a military school at Middletown, CT, from which he graduated with honors at eighteen.  Shortly thereafter he received Christ and felt the call to preach the gospel and it wasn’t long until he was in the front ranks of the Baptist ministry in the South.  His culture and wealth gave him access to important people such as Jackson, Calhoun, Clay, and Daniel Webster.  He spent a great deal of time in the State and nations capitals.  Because he was a large slave holder he became deeply involved in the most pressing issue of the day.  After struggling prayerfully over this question for years he came to the conclusion that slavery was morally and spiritually wrong and expended some of his wealth to purchase land in Ohio, and after buying back some of the slaves that he had sold, resettled them providing homes and abundant supplies.  He spent his last twenty-five years preaching the gospel of Christ in Wisconsin.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, pp. 139.
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97 — April 07—This Day in Baptist History Past


A Patient Sowing and Enduring Bringeth Forth Fruit

“…not many noble, are called:” But thankfully He does call some.

On April 7 1657 – Henry Dunster, President of Cambridge College (now Harvard), was so stirred in his mind that he turned his attention to the subject of infant baptism and soon rejected it altogether. It was upon the persecution of Obadiah Holmes and others who had taken a strong stand for believers’ baptism that the faithfulness of Holmes, the publicity his enemies gave to his convictions, his willingness to suffer for convictions, and the beastliness of a church-state (Congregational), that denied its citizens religious freedom, all magnified the truth he propagated.

Dunster’s success in promoting Harvard by furthering its interests, collecting large sums of money in its behalf, and even giving one hundred acres to it, was marvelous and testified to his commitment to the institution. But he had a higher commitment to the truth of God and began to preach against infant baptism in the church at Cambridge in 1653, to the great alarm of the entire community. Armitage quotes Prince in pronouncing Dunster “‘one of the greatest masters of the Oriental languages that hath been known in these ends of the earth’, but he laid aside all his honors and positions in obedience to his convictions.”

Dunster was forced to resign his presidency of Harvard College, April 7, 1657, after which he was arraigned before the Middlesex court for refusing to have his child baptized.

Dr. Dale R. Hart from: Adapted from:  This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 141-142.

 

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