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283 – Oct. 10 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

A Blessed Baptist historian

October 10, 1779 – David Benedict was born to Thomas and Abigail near Stratford, New York. When David was 14 he was apprenticed to a shoemaker and for seven years labored in that trade. His ability secured an opportunity for the manufacturing and retailing business in that field, but his conversion to Christ at age 20 changed the course of his life.

In Dec. 1799 he was baptized in the Housatonic River and united with the First Baptist Church of Stratford. In 1802 he gave up the career of shoemaker and entered the academy of the Rev. Stephen S. Nelson at Mt. Pleasant, N.Y., and paid his way by tutoring other students. One of them was Francis Wayland, future President of Brown University. In fact David also graduated from Brown U. in 1806. He presented an oration on Ecclesiastic History at graduation. 

In 1808 he married the daughter of Dr. Stephen Gano. They were married for 60 years and had 9 sons and 3 daughters.  After graduation David became pastor of the First Baptist Church of Pawtucket and continued there for 25 years.  America’s first Sunday school came into existence there. 

For many years David had collected material and he wrote the History of the Baptists in the United States, and to some extent in other countries.  Benedict traveled throughout the young nation on horseback, covering nearly four thousand miles. 

Dr. Benedict lived to the age of 95.  Up until his death on Dec. 5, 1874, his eyesight was unimpaired, and he was able to write clearly both day and night.  Baptists are indebted to David Benedict for preserving so well our Baptist annals for coming generations.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 420-21.

 

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The Battle of Brooklyn Heights began August 27, 1776


Battle of Brooklyn HeightsAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

British forces left Boston and headed to New York.

General George Washington moved his troops to New York, fortifying Brooklyn Heights.

Enthusiasm was high and Washington’s ranks swelled to nearly 20,000.

Before long, hundreds of British ships filled New York’s harbor, carrying 32,000 troops.

It was the largest invasion force in history to that date.

The thousands of wooden masts of the British ships were described as looking like a forest.

In Congress, May 1776, General William Livingston made a resolution which passed without dissent:

“We earnestly recommend that Friday, the 17th day of May be observed by the colonies as a day of humiliation, fasting, and prayer,

that we may with united hearts confess and bewail our manifold sins…and by a sincere repentance…appease God’s righteous displeasure,

and through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ obtain His pardon and forgiveness.”

In New York, General Washington ordered his troops, May 15, 1776:

“The Continental Congress having ordered Friday the 17th…to be observed as a Day of Fasting, Humiliation and Prayer,

humbly to supplicate the mercy of Almighty God, that it would please Him to pardon all our manifold sins and transgressions, and to prosper the arms of the United Colonies,

and finally establish the peace and freedom of America upon a solid and lasting foundation;

The General commands all officers and soldiers to pay strict obedience to the orders of the Continental Congress;

that, by their unfeigned and pious observance of their religious duties, they may incline the Lord and Giver of victory to prosper our arms.”

On July 9, 1776, messengers from Philadelphia delivered to New York a copy of the Declaration of Independence, which Washington had read to his troops.

The Declaration mentioned God four times:

“Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God…”

“All Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights…”

“Appealing to the Supreme Judge of the World for the Rectitude of
our Intentions…”

“With a firm Reliance on the Protection of divine Providence.”

Citizens of New York pulled down the statue of the ‘tyrant’ King George and classes were stopped at King’s College, which later reopened as Columbia College.

On AUGUST 27, 1776, the Battle of Brooklyn Heights (Long Island) began.

It was the first major battle after America had officially declared its independence, and it was the largest battle of the entire war.

Washington expected an attack from the sea, similar to what the British did at the Battle of Bunker Hill.

Instead, 10,000 British troops landed a distance from New York and a British loyalist led them through Jamaica Pass, marching all night long to make a surprise attack on the Continental Army from behind.

An estimated 3,000 Americans were killed or wounded compared to only 392 British casualties.

As General Washington watched 400 soldiers of the First Maryland Regiment charge six times directly into the British lines, allowing the rest of the Continental Army to find cover, he exclaimed:

“Good God, what brave fellows I have lost this day.”

British General Howe trapped the 8,000 American troops on Brooklyn Heights with their backs against the sea.

That night, Washington made the desperate decision to evacuate his entire army by ferrying it across the East River to Manhattan Island.

The sea was boisterous where the British ships were, but providentially calm in the East River allowing Washington’s boats to transport troops, horses and cannons.

The next morning, as the sun began to rise, half of the America troops were still in danger, but a “miraculously” thick fog lingered blocking the evacuation from being seen by the British.

Major Ben Tallmadge, Washington’s Chief of Intelligence, wrote:

“As the dawn of the next day approached, those of us who remained in the trenches became very anxious for our own safety, and when the dawn appeared there were several regiments still on duty.

At this time a very dense fog began to rise off the river, and it seemed to settle in a peculiar manner over both encampments.

I recollect this peculiar providential occurrence perfectly well, and so very dense was the atmosphere that I could scarcely discern a man at six yards distance…

We tarried until the sun had risen, but the fog remained as dense as ever.”

General Washington was on the last boat that left Brooklyn Heights.

Had the Americans not been able to evacuate, the war would have ended there.

As it happened, the British never again had such an opportunity to capture the entire American army at one time.

Washington wrote later that year, August 20, 1778:

“The Hand of Providence has been so conspicuous in all this-the course of the war-that he must be worse than an infidel that lacks faith.”

While in Brooklyn, New York, November 1, 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt spoke of enemy tactics during World War II:

“Those forces hate democracy and Christianity as two phases of the same civilization.

They oppose democracy because it is Christian. They oppose Christianity because it preaches democracy…

We are a nation of many nationalities, many races, many religions bound together by a single unity, the unity of freedom and equality…”

FDR concluded:

“Whoever seeks to set one nationality against another, seeks to degrade all nationalities.

Whoever seeks to set one race against another seeks to enslave all races…

So-called racial and religious voting blocs are the creation of designing politicians who profess to be able to deliver them on Election Day…

But every American citizen…will scorn such unpatriotic politicians.

The vote of Americans will be American – and only American.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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185 – July 03 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

Clough-John

 

Great outpouring of God’s Spirit

 

Rev. John E. Clough was born July 16, 1836, in New York. Soon afterwards they moved to Illinois and finally to Iowa. While training as a lawyer in Burlington in 1857 he was brought under conviction and was gloriously saved. Believing that he was called to proclaim the gospel to those who had never heard, he trained at Upper Iowa University and graduated in 1862. His appointment as a Baptist missionary to India took place in August of 1864, and he arrived in that country in March of 1865. Others had pioneered the work before him beginning in 1836. Lyman Jewett joined the mission in 1849. In 1852 he and his wife visited Ongole. They climbed a slope that overlooked the city and prayed that God would send a missionary to Ongole. Clough responded to that prayer and relocated to that city, and a modern miracle began. On Jan. 1, 1867 they organized a church with 8 members, and by the end of 1879, that church had grown to 13,106 members, with 46 national preachers and thirty assistants. His methods were biblical, tent meetings of evangelism, nationals were trained, and a circuit of more than eighty villages forty miles around ongole. As the work grew other missionaries came to join in the work. During a 3 year famine and pestilence they didn’t baptize but when it was over they baptized on July 3, 1878, 2,222 in one day. From June 16 to July 31, 1878, 8,691 had been immersed upon their profession of faith. This was one of the greatest outpourings of God’s spirit since Pentecost.

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 272-73.

 

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268 – Sept. 25 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

They reached the Navajo

 

1852, Rev. and Mrs. Samuel Gorman were approved by the American Baptist Home Mission Society to serve among the Navajos in New Mexico. That field had recently been opened by H.W. Read of Connecticut. Two additional couples had also recently gone to that field of service, including James Milton Shaw and his wife from New York. A letter from Bro. Gorman dated in 1876 relates many of the trying experiences from the time that they arrived in Laguna in 1852. They had a nine month delayed entrance into “the Pueblo” as promised by Capt. Henry L. Dodge. The priests (Catholic) had done everything possible to “rout” them from the village including suing them at law in Taos, which they won at great cost of time and money. At times they had a hard time finding enough to eat and out of funds most of the time. Thankfully when Capt. Dodge did come he persuaded the Indians to allow them to teach their children and to preach Christ to them. He was able to preach every Sabbath except when on mission tours and finally in 1858 he was able to build a little chapel. The first Indian convert in N.M. was Jose Senon who carried on the work when the missionaries had to leave when the area was occupied by the Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. Gorman died at 92 after he pastored successful churches in Ohio and Wisconsin. [Lewis A. Myers, A History of N.M. Baptists (Baptist Convention of New Mexico, 1995), pp. 59-60. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 525-27.] Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

 

 

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185 – July, 03 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Great outpouring of God’s Spirit

Rev. John E. Clough was born July 16, 1836, in New York. Soon afterwards they moved to Illinois and finally to Iowa. While training as a lawyer in Burlington in 1857 he was brought under conviction and was gloriously saved. Believing that he was called to proclaim the gospel to those who had never heard, he trained at Upper Iowa University and graduated in 1862. His appointment as a Baptist missionary to India took place in August of 1864, and he arrived in that country in March of 1865. Others had pioneered the work before him beginning in 1836. Lyman Jewett joined the mission in 1849. In 1852 he and his wife visited Ongole. They climbed a slope that overlooked the city and prayed that God would send a missionary to Ongole. Clough responded to that prayer and relocated to that city, and a modern miracle began. On Jan. 1, 1867 they organized a church with 8 members, and by the end of 1879, that church had grown to 13,106 members with 46 national preachers and thirty assistants. His methods were biblical, tent meetings of evangelism, nationals were trained, and a circuit of more than eighty villages forty miles around Ongole. As the work grew other missionaries came to join in the work. During a 3 year famine and pestilence they didn’t baptize but when it was over they baptized on July 3, 1878, 2,222 in one day.  From June 16 to July 31, 1878, 8,691 had been immersed upon their profession of faith. This was one of the greatest outpourings of God’s spirit since Pentecost.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: adapted From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 272-73.

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89 – March 30 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Absolom Backus Earle gave a report of his labors as a missionary in New York in 1938 which contained the following information.  He had labored faithfully at Mohawk, Auriesville, Fultonville, Fonda and vicinity for two years and at the close, he said, “I do not know of but one person that has given evidence of a new birth since I began my missionary labors.”  It is hard to believe that he is the same A.E. Earle that James Beller writes of in his account.  Earle was born in 1812 in Charlton, N.Y.  He was converted at the age of 16 and began preaching at age 18.  He was ordained at Amsterdam, N.Y. at age 21 where he was pastor for five years, and then resigned to enter the field of evangelism.  For 58 years he held revivals, city-wide campaigns, and protracted meetings in every state of the Union and Canada.  It is estimated that he conducted 1,000 protracted meetings, and traveled over 350,000 miles.  He had nearly 160,000 conversions, and 400 called to the Gospel ministry.  Earle also was the author of several books.  He died at Newton, Mass., on Mar. 30, 1895, at the age of 83.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon, adapted from: This Day in Baptist History III (David L. Cummins), pp. 184-86.

 

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