Tag Archives: merited

329 – Nov. 25 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

He repudiated infant Baptism

 

1790 – John Macgowan, aged 54, died and was buried in Bunhill Field, London, England. The following words marks his resting place, “Here lies John Macgowan, U.D.M., who at the hand of God merited nothing but final destruction, yet, through grace, was enabled to hope in a finished salvation.” Eph. II, 8. The letters “U.D.M.” stand for Verbum Dei Minister, i.e., “Minister of the Word of God.” During his final sickness he was visited by a pastor friend, Rev. John Reynolds, who said, “I found him in a sweet and heavenly frame; his countenance indicated the serenity of his mind. He said…hear of the loving kindness of my God. Methinks I have as much of heaven as I can hold.” Then tears of joy like a river flowed from his eyes…We are to part here; but we shall meet again. You cannot conceive the pleasure I feel…, that I have not shunned to declare (according to my light and ability) the whole counsel of God. I can die on the doctrines that I have preached – they are true – I have found them so. Go on to preach the Gospel of Christ, and mind not what the world may say to you.” Upon parting, he said, ‘My dear brother, farewell—I shall see you no more.”  John Macgowan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, about 1726, obviously into a household of penury, for at an early age he was apprenticed to a weaver to be trained for that occupation. He was converted through the influence of the Methodists, but after a thorough examination of the scriptures he repudiated infant Baptism and was immersed as a believer. He became pastor of the Devonshire Baptist Church in London at age 41 in 1767, and stayed until his death. [Alfren W. Light, Bunhill Fields (London: C.J. Farncombe and Sons, Ltd., 1915), pp. 226-27. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 645-46.]   Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

The post 329 – Nov. 25 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under Church History