Tag Archives: Jesus Christ

HOW TO KNOW THERE IS A GOD


Pope’s Points

Julian Pope

HOW TO KNOW THERE IS A GOD

Would you like to know that there is a God, that Jesus Christ is His Son and Savior, and what true teaching is? Will, Jesus Himself suggested an experiment: Joh_7:17 If any man will do his will, he shall know of the doctrine, whether it be of God, or whether I speak of myself. The responsibility is on the seeker. He must be willing to do God’s will when it is revealed to him. God promises no light to one who closes his eyes against it, nor any spiritual food to one who will not eat.

If you are an honest doubter, will you pray this prayer? “God, if you exist, I ask You to reveal Yourself to me. I am willing to do Your will if You reveal it to me, and will accept Jesus as my Savior if You reveal Him to me as Your Son.” Then read the entire Gospel of John, first noting its purpose in chapter 20, verse 31.

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Agreement of the Settlers at Exeter in New Hampshire


Agreement of the Settlers at Exeter in New Hampshire

THEY WERE BELIEVERS, COLONIAL NEW HAMPSHIRE

March 16, 1680


Exeter Combination fixedWhereas it hath pleased the Lord to moue the heart of our Dread Soveraigne Charles, by the grace of God, King of England, Scotland, France & Ireland, to grant license & liberty to sundry of his subjects to plant themselves in the westerne partes of America: Wee, his loyall subjects, brethren of the church of Exeter, situate & lying upon Piscataquacke, wth other inhabitants there, considering wth ourselves the holy will of god and our owne necessity, that we should not live whout wholsome lawes & government amongst us, of wch we are altogether destitute; doe in the name of Christ & in the sight of God combine ourselves together, to erect & set up amongst us such government as shall be to our best discerning, agreeable to the will of god, professing ourselves subjects to our Sovereign Lord King Charles, according to the Libertys of our English Colony of the Massachusetts & binding ourselves solemnely by the grace & helpe of Christ & in his name & fear to submit ourselves to such godly & christian laws as are established in the realme of England to our best knowledge, & to all other such lawes wch shall upon good grounds, be made & inacted amongst us according to God, yt we may live quietly & peaceablely together, in all godliness and honesty.

Signed by John Whelewright and thirty-four others.

The Elders or Rulers Oath

You shall swear by the great and dreadful Name of the High God, Maker and Governor of Heaven and earth and by the Lord Jesus Christ, the Prince of the Kings and rulers of the earth, that in his Name and fear you will rule and govern his people according to the righteous will of God, ministering justice and judgment on the workers of iniquite, and ministering due incouragement and countenance to well doers, protecting of the people so far as in you lieth, by the help of God from foreigne annoyance and inward desturbance, that they may live a quiet and peacabble life in all godliness and honesty. So God be helpful and gracious to you and yours in Christ Jesus.

The Oath of the People

We do swear by the Great and dreadful Name of the High God, Maker and Governor of heaven and earth, and by the Lord Jesus Christ, the King and Saviour of his people, that in his Name and fear, we will submit ourselves to be ruled and governed according to the will and word of God, and such wholsome laws and ordinances as shall be derived therefrom by our honored Rulers and the lawful assistants, with the consent of the people, and that we will be ready to assist them by the help of God, in the administration of justice and preservation of the peace, with our bodies and goods and best endeavors according to God. So God protect and save us and ours in Jesus Christ.


Source: Hammond, Isaac Weare (1831-1890)., Editor. Town Papers: Documents Relating to Towns in New Hampshire. Concord, N.H. : Parsons B. Cogswell, state printer (publisher), 1882.  The copyright of these documents is held in the Public Domain. Formatted for the Internet © 2014 Steve Farrell and The Moral Liberal.


They Were Believers is researched, compiled, and edited (with occasional commentary and explanatory notes) by Steve Farrell, Founder and Editor In Chief of The Moral Liberal. Copyright © 2012-2014 Steve Farrell.

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To Do Thy Will  


Hebrews 10:4-10

Then said I, Lo, I come (in the volume of the book it is written of me,) to do thy will, O God,” Hebrews 10:7.

 


 

 

Jesus Christ shed His blood and laid down His life for me! When I take a moment to let this truth sink in it humbles me. To see the sacrifice it took to cover my sins is sobering. How can I ever give anything back to Him that measures up to that? My life is all I have to give.

Sin absolutely wrecked our world. All of God’s creation feels its effects, including you and I. We are a broken people. Sin has devastated our lives and separated us from God. Just anything will not work as a worthy sacrifice to reconcile us back to God.

In today’s passage, we see the writer of Hebrews quote a psalm of David’s. Verse 4 speaks of the impossibility of the blood of bulls and goats to remove sin. The animal sacrifices in the Old Testament were great pictures that showed us the seriousness of our transgressions before God, but they fell short of paying the price for sin.

Then Jesus entered the world and became the answer for our sins. He offered Himself as the ultimate sacrifice. His death and shed blood was able to accomplish what the blood of animals never could.

Now we have a reason to serve Him. The knowledge of what Jesus did on our behalf should serve as all the motivation we will ever need. When we consider the enormous gift that God gave to us, we should react by giving Him our lives.

 

 

JUST ASKING

Is the truth of Jesus’ sacrifice serving as your motivator for doing His will?

Nathan Rogers

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THE LAW


Author – Dr. W.P. Mackay, M. A  1903

 

‘The law was given by Moses: grace and truth came by Jesus Christ.’ The law showed what man ought to be. Christ showed what man is, and what God is. The law was given, but grace and truth came. The word translated ‘came’ is very strong in the original. It might be rendered ‘were impersonated’ in Him — always kept in due harmony and proportion. Calvary tells out fully what man’s true state is, what God’s truth is, and what grace means. The law is what man ought to be to God. Grace tells what God is for me. The first word of law is ‘Thou,’ the first of grace is ‘God’ so loved. But it is grace through truth. God has investigated everything, nothing has been overlooked. The greatest sin that any man could possibly commit has been committed, namely, the murder of God’s Son. At the same time the greatest grace of God has been manifested.

 

Wonderful, marvelous grace

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275 – Oct. 02 – This Day in Baptist History Past


The Holy Spirit began troubling their spirit for world missions

The Northhamptonshire Baptist Association in England was formally incorporated on October 02, 1792, and the first subscription, made on the spot, amounted to E13. 2s. 6d. This sum, though small, was comparatively large; for it was the contribution of a few poor but enlightened servants of Jesus Christ. Our forefathers were forced for years to worship in clandestine assemblies for fear of persecution. As a result, believers had long forgotten the Great Commission of our Lord.  To be sure there was personal witnessing, but it was nearly impossible to carry the gospel into other nations.  

As Baptists gained religious freedom the Holy Spirit began troubling their spirit for world missions. One group was the Association mentioned above. “At the meeting in Nottingham in 1784, it was resolved to set apart an hour on the first Monday evening of every month, ‘for extraordinary prayer for the revival of religion, and for the extending of Christ’s kingdom in the world.’ The suggestion    proceeded from the venerable (John) Sutcliff”

From 1787 to 1790, William Carey presented the importance of missionary effort. Few were found who sympathized with him. Once in fact John Ryland censured Carey for suggesting a title for a younger minister to bring regarding a missions subject. But Thomas Potts had it published into a tract. At the May meeting Carey preached from Isa. 54:2-3. Expect Great things from God; Attempt great things for God.

The pastors were greatly moved which resulted in the organization of the missions organization and the launching of the modern day missionary movement. Carey himself was the first missionary to leave out for India.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 408-10.

 

 

The post 275 – Oct. 02 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

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First Session of Continental Congress was opened with prayer


Continental Congress painting 01American Minute with Bill Federer

SEPTEMBER 7, 1774, the First Session of the Continental Congress was opened with prayer in Carpenter’s Hall, Philadelphia.

Threatened by the most powerful monarch in the world, Britain’s King George III, America’s founding fathers heard Rev. Jacob Duche’ begin by reading Psalm 35, the Anglican Book of Common Prayer’s “Psalter” for that day:

“Plead my cause, Oh, Lord, with them that strive with me, fight against them that fight against me. Take hold of buckler and shield, and rise up for my help.

Draw also the spear and the battle-axe to meet those who pursue me; Say to my soul, ‘I am your salvation.’ Let those be ashamed and dishonored who seek my life; Let those be turned back and humiliated who devise evil against me.”

Then Rev. Jacob Duche’ prayed:

“Be Thou present, O God of Wisdom, and direct the counsel of this Honorable Assembly; enable them to settle all things on the best and surest foundations; that the scene of blood may be speedily closed;

that Order, Harmony and Peace may be effectually restored, and that Truth and Justice, Religion and Piety, prevail and flourish among the people…

Preserve the health of their bodies, and the vigor of their minds, shower down on them, and the millions they here represent, such temporal Blessings as Thou seest expedient for them in this world, and crown them with everlasting Glory in the world to come.

All this we ask in the name and through the merits of Jesus Christ, Thy Son and our Saviour, Amen.”

That same day, John Adams wrote to his wife, Abigail, describing the prayer:

“When the Congress met, Mr. Cushing made a motion that it should be opened with Prayer.

It was opposed by Mr. Jay of New York, and Mr. Rutledge of South Carolina because we were so divided in religious sentiments, some Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabaptists, some Presbyterians, and some Congregationalists, that we could not join in the same act of worship.

Samuel Adams

Mr. Samuel Adams arose and said that he was no bigot, and could hear a Prayer from any gentleman of Piety and virtue, who was at the same time a friend to his Country.

He was a stranger in Philadelphia, but had heard that Mr. Duche’ deserved that character and therefore he moved that Mr. Duche’, an Episcopal clergyman might be desired to read Prayers to Congress tomorrow morning.

The motion was seconded, and passed in the affirmative. Mr. Randolph, our president, vailed on Mr. Duche’, and received for answer, that if his health would permit, he certainly would…”

Adams continued:

“Accordingly, next morning Reverend Mr. Duche’ appeared with his clerk and in his pontificals, and read several prayers in the established form, and read the collect for the seventh day of September, which was the thirty-fifth Psalm.

You must remember, this was the next morning after we heard the horrible rumor of the cannonade of Boston.

I never saw a greater effect upon an audience. It seemed as if heaven had ordained that Psalm to be read on that morning.

After this, Mr. Duche’, unexpectedly to every body, struck out into an extemporary prayer, which filled the bosom of every man present. I must confess, I never heard a better prayer, or one so well pronounced.

Episcopalian as he is, Dr. Cooper himself never prayed with such fervor, such ardor, such earnestness and pathos, and in language so elegant and sublime, for America, for the Congress, for the province of Massachusetts Bay, and especially the town of Boston. It has had an excellent effect upon everybody here. I must beg you to read that Psalm.”

The Library of Congress printed on an historical placard of Carpenter’s Hall, Philadelphia:

“Washington was kneeling there with Henry, Randolph, Rutledge, Lee, and Jay, and by their side there stood, bowed in reverence the Puritan Patriots of New England…

‘It was enough’ says Mr. Adams, ‘to melt a heart of stone. I saw the tears gush into the eyes of the old, grave, Pacific Quakers of Philadelphia.’”

The Journals of Congress then recorded their appreciation to Rev. Mr. Duche’:

Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 7, 1774, 9 o’clock a.m. Agreeable to the resolve of yesterday, the meeting was opened with prayers by the Rev. Mr. Duche’.

Voted, That the thanks of Congress be given to Mr. Duche’…for performing divine Service, and for the excellent prayer, which he composed and delivered on the occasion.”

Rev. Jacob Duche’ exhorted Philadelphia’s soldiers, July 7, 1775:

“Considering myself under the twofold character of a minister of Jesus Christ, and a fellow-citizen…involved in the same public calamity with yourselves…

addressing myself to you as freemen…’Stand fast, therefore, in the liberty, wherewith Christ hath made us free’ (Galatians, ch. 5).”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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Whom Do You Trust?  


 

Psalm 20:1-9

“The Lord saveth his anointed; he will hear him from his holy heaven with the saving strength of his right hand,” Psalm 20:6.

An agnostic mountain climber in the freezing Alps, holding to his rope, fell from a cliff. He came to the end of his rope facing up. Looking straight into the sky, all he could see above him was the cliff covered in heavy falling snow. He knew he must do something quickly before he froze to death. Looking into the snowy-white atmosphere above, he decided to see whether God really was up there. “God! If You are up there, help me before I die!” “Sure,” God yelled back, “Just turn loose of the rope.” The rescue team found him three days later, still clinging to the rope, hanging in space, looking up, three feet from the ground.

In the human experience, many trust in that which can be seen and held in their hands. Those who know Jesus Christ as Savior trust in the unseen God. That which is not of faith is sin. The Holy Spirit generates faith in the unseen God.

The rich young ruler had everything going for him, health, wealth and position. Jesus indicated whatever one trusts in for security that is his God.

Since God is Spirit and must be trusted in spirit and in truth, how then are we assured we are worshiping and trusting the right God? “He that hath my commandments, and keepeth them, he it is that loveth me: and he that loveth me shall be loved of my Father, and I will love him, and will manifest myself to him” (John 14:21). After faith comes obedience, then He says He will make it clear that He is busy bringing about His will in our lives.

 

IN OTHER WORDS

Turn loose of the rope.

Robert Brock

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Napoleon, born August 15, 1769


Napoleon_in_His_StudyAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

After the French Revolution, a slave revolt resulted in France’s loss of Haiti (Saint-Domingue), one of the world’s main producers of sugar.

Desiring to replace it with another tropical colony in order to compete with Britain’s India, the French General Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Egypt in 1798.

Napoleon defeated the Egyptian Mamluk slave cavalry in just a few weeks.

Napoleon then attempted to introduce democracy, equality and liberty but found there were no words in the Arabic language to convey such concepts, as they had been ruled for centuries by the sword.

Napoleon uncovered the Pyramid treasures, the Rosetta Stone and conquered into Palestine.

After losing the Battle of the Nile to Britain, he eventually had to return to France.

Napoleon, born AUGUST 15, 1769, then conquered across Europe – from Italy, Austria, Poland, and German States, to Holland, Denmark and Norway.

His military ‘envelopment’ tactic and use of mobile artillery resulted in him being considered one of the greatest military commanders of all time.

He spread the metric system and a civil-legal system – the Napoleonic Code – which emancipated Catholics in Protestant countries and Protestants in Catholic countries, as well as Jews across Europe.

Fearing Haiti’s slave rebellion would spread to the French Louisiana Territory, and badly needing money for his Army, Napoleon sold a million square miles of land to the United States in 1803 – the “Louisiana Purchase.”

Napoleon’s draining war in Spain inadvertently resulted in the Mexican War of Independence.

The loss of French troops retreating from Russia and his defeat at Leipzig led to Napoleon’s abdication and exile on the Island of Elba in 1813.

After a year, he escaped and again took control of France for 100 dates, but lost the Battle of Waterloo to Britain, June 18, 1815.

During the 17 years of Napoleonic Wars, an estimated 6 million Europeans died.

In October 1815, Napoleon was banished to the South Atlantic Island of Saint Helena, where he died in 1821 at the age of 52.

Reflecting on his life, Napoleon dictated his “Mémoires” to General de Montholon, Baron Gourgaud and General Bertrand.

His conversations were recorded by Emmanuel de Las Cases in Memorial de Sainte Hélène (published 1823).

Napoleon had complained to Montholon of not having a chaplain, resulting in Pope Pius VII petitioning England to allow Abbé Vignali to be sent.

Napoleon read out loud the Old Testament, the Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles.

Affirming his belief in God, Napoleon told Montholon:

“I know men; and I tell you that Jesus Christ is not a man.

Superficial minds see a resemblance between Christ and the founders of empires, and the gods of other religions. That resemblance does not exist.

There is between Christianity and whatever other religions the distance of infinity…

His religion is a revelation from an intelligence which certainly is not that of man.

The religion of Christ is a mystery which subsists by its own force, and proceeds from a mind which is not a human mind.

We find in it a marked individuality, which originated a train of words and actions unknown before…”

Order American Minute-Notable Events of American Significance Remembered on the Date they Occurred

Napoleon continued:

“Jesus is not a philosopher, for His proofs are miracles, and from the first His disciples adored Him.

Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne, and myself founded empires; but upon what foundation did we rest the creations of our genius? Upon force!

But Jesus Christ founded His upon love; and at this hour millions of men would die for Him.”

Napoleon had stated:

“The Bible is no mere book, but a Living Creature, with a power that conquers all that oppose it.”

Napoleon once told a Milan parish priest in 1797:

“Society without religion is like a ship without a compass.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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227 – August 15 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

 

One of the Leaders in the Fight for Liberty”        

William Webber was born on August 15, 1747, to parents of moderate means and received only three years of formal education, and yet he was considered one of the spiritual fathers and pioneers of the gospel in Virginia. He became a carpenter and worked at that trade until he was converted to Jesus Christ under the preaching of John Waller and quickly became an exhorter.

Few men in Virginia suffered more persecutions than Webber. He was among those who preached through the grates of the Chesterfield County jail, spending three months there. In the same year of 1771 he was taken from the platform where he was preaching to the Middlesex County jail for forty-five days, where he, along with several others, preached twice a week, through the bars to those that would hear.

He was also roughly treated on many occasions. In spite of these things, the gospel prospered, and Baptist principles were embraced by many. Many strong and fruitful churches were planted such as the Powhatah church, out of which no less than fourteen preachers were called early in its history.

Early on , Webber became pastor of the Dover Church in Goochland County, VA, and in spite of his poor circumstances, he gave a great deal of time in his youth to preaching. But as his family grew, he found it necessary to limit his labors to his own area. Semple says, “He was very successful in turning many to righteousness; and in confirming the souls of his disciples. He was a man of sound and correct judgment…well versed in the scripture, and ingenious in defending them against error. He was one of the leaders to represent the Baptists in the fight for liberty.”

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 335-36.

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Assurance of Resurrection  


 

 

John 11:23-26

“Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life; he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die. Believest thou this?” John 11:25, 26.

 

There are a lot of things in this world that can make us feel unsure. The feeling of true assurance is something that avoids us all too much. When we are able to fix our hearts on things that we know are sure, it brings security to our lives.

Merriam-Webster defines assurance as “being certain in the mind” and “inspiring confidence.” Nothing can bring more certainty to the mind and inspire more confidence in the heart of a believer than God’s Word. In today’s Scripture, we see a promise that should ease the heart of every believer, a truth that should set our minds at peace. And what is that truth?

Death will never defeat the believer!

That is a powerful truth! Through Jesus Christ, we have total victory over death. Life, the assurance of the resurrection, is a sure reality that we can rest in.

Christ has the authority to make this promise. Why? Because He is life and He is the resurrection. As believers we are “in Christ” (1 Cor. 15:22). By being placed in Him, we are also placed in His resurrection and in His life. That means we have the assurance of these promises, and “The Lord is not slack concerning his promise” (2 Peter 3:9).

 

 

JUST A THOUGHT

Will you rest in the assurance of God’s promises?

Nathan Rogers

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