Tag Archives: Japan

V-J Day, August 14, 1945


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

V-J Day, AUGUST 14, 1945, President Harry S Truman stated at a News Conference announcing the end of World War II:

“I have received this afternoon a message from the Japanese Government…

‘His Majesty the Emperor is prepared to authorize and ensure the signature of his Government and the Imperial General Headquarters of the necessary terms for carrying out the provisions of the Potsdam declaration…and all the forces under their control wherever located to cease active operations, to surrender arms.’”

The next day, in anticipation of the Jewish New Year, President Truman stated:

“I extend to all my fellow Americans of Jewish faith my hearty congratulations and best wishes for New Year’s Day.

The enemies of civilization who would have destroyed completely all freedom of religion have been defeated. All faiths unite in thanksgiving to Almighty God on our victory over the forces of evil.

Let us now all join to create the kind of peace settlement which will keep alive freedom of religious belief all over the world, and prevent the recurrence of all this misery and destruction.

That is the most fitting memorial we can erect to those who have fought and suffered and labored and died in this struggle to preserve decency for mankind.”

On August 16, 1945, Truman proclaimed a Day of Prayer:

“The warlords of Japan…have surrendered unconditionally…

This is the end of the…schemes of dictators to enslave the peoples of the world, destroy their civilization, and institute a new era of darkness and degradation.”

Truman continued:

“Our global victory has come from the courage…of free men and women united in determination to fight. It has come from the massive strength of arms…created by peace-loving peoples who knew that unless they won, decency in the world would end.

It has come from millions of peaceful citizens…turned soldiers overnight – who showed a ruthless enemy that they were not afraid to fight…”

Harry S Truman concluded:

“It has come with the help of God, Who was with us in the early days of adversity and…Who has now brought us to this glorious day of triumph.

Let us give thanks to Him and…dedicated ourselves to follow in His ways.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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75 – March – 16 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


First white woman to see Japan
1907 – Lucy Ann (St. John) Knowlton, the first white woman to see Japan died on this day.  Few in the little white frame building that housed the First Baptist Church of Napoleon, Michigan would have ever though that one of theirs would have such honor.  Lucy was the daughter of a deacon who married Miles J. Knowlton, a missionary to China, and saw the land of the “Rising Sun” as they were bound for that land, having sailed for Ningpo, China on Dec. 10, 1853.  The Knowlton’s arrived in China as the civil war was raging in that country and it lasted for many years.  Knowlton’s efforts in evangelism met with great success over the twenty-one years that they spent in Ningpo.  However, as the war swept into their area, Mrs. Knowlton saw things that literally shocked her to the point that her health collapsed and they had to return to America for restoration.  In two years her health was improved and they were able to return and they enjoyed a blessed spiritual harvest.  At the conclusion of fifteen years, and Lucy’s health deteriorating again they took another two year furlough in the States.  It was his only furlough and during this time he lectured in several colleges and seminaries where he also received an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree.  He was also able to preach in his home church in Vermont where he saw the joy of seeing converts baptized.  In 1872 the Knowlton’s sailed again for Ningpo from San Francisco and this time it was only a trip of four weeks since they didn’t have to sail around the Cape Horn.  However, after two years Dr. Knowlton died of exhaustion.    Lucy lived on for twenty more years and was invited often to speak to ladies groups concerning the challenges of China.  She went to be with her Lord from their daughter’s home in Chicago.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, pp. 107.
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225 – Aug. 13 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Four hundred years invested by one family

 

Shanghai on Fire

 

1937 – Japan attacked Shanghai.  Stephen Josiah Goddard, the son of a long line of American missionaries to China returned to the US with his wife Elizabeth, only to return in Nov. of 1939.  As the threat of war escalated, his wife and son went back to the states.  His plans for a furlough fell through on Dec. 7, 1941 when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor and he found himself a fugitive from the Japanese army.  Eventually he was flown in a DC-3 over the mountains of western China and Burma, known as the Burma “Hump”.  From Calcutta he boarded a Liberty ship back to America after zigzagging from ocean to ocean to escape Japanese and German U-boats, arriving back in America on Nov. 2, 1943, and casting anchor near the Statue of Liberty.  Goddard continued his missionary work at the end of the war.  All five generations of the Dean-Goddard family dedicated their lives to Chinese missions.  There was, “William Dean, the pioneer; Josiah Goddard, the translator; Francis Wayland Goddard, the Doctor; Josiah Ripley Goddard, the evangelist; Stephen Josiah Goddard, the teacher and businessman.”  Altogether over four hundred years were invested by these men and their families, that the Chinese might know the Gospel of the grace of God. [Francis Wayland Goddard, Called to Cathy (New York: Baptist Lit. Bureau, 1948) This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp 442-444]   Prepared by Dr. Greg Dixon

 

 

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221 – August 09 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

221 – August 09 – This Day in Baptist History Past

Lest we forget

On this date in 1945, the second atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, and for all intents and purposes the Second World War was over.  Baptist families were not exempt from the sacrifices of war.  Many homes proudly exhibited a blue-starred service flag in the front window declaring that someone from that home was serving their country in the war effort.  How sad it was when that family often received a dreaded telegram from someone like General George Marshal, with the words, “Your son died a gallant soldier’s death in our battle for liberty.”  Then the blue flag was exchanged with great honor for a gold one.  We want to pause today to honor all of you, who are still living, who served in World War II.  God bless you all. Psalm 33:12 – “Blessed is the Nation whose God is the Lord.”

[This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp.  435, 36].

Prepared by Dr. Greg Dixon

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THE DAY JAPAN BOMBED BROOKINGS, OREGON


Brookings, Oregon By: Norm Goyer

September 9, 1942, the I-25 class Japanese submarine was cruising in an easterly direction raising its periscope occasionally as it neared the United States Coastline. Japan had attacked Pearl Harbor less than a year ago and the Captain of the attack submarine knew that Americans were watching their coast line for ships and aircraft that might attack our country. Dawn was approaching; the first rays of the sun were flickering off the periscopes lens. Their mission; attack the west coast with incendiary bombs in hopes of starting a devastating forest fire. If this test run were successful, Japan had hopes of using their huge submarine fleet to attack the eastern end of the Panama Canal to slow down shipping from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The Japanese Navy had a large number of I-400 submarines under construction. Each capable of carrying three aircraft.  Pilot Chief Warrant Officer Nobuo Fujita and his crewman Petty Officer Shoji Okuda were making last minute checks of their charts making sure they matched those of the submarine’s navigator.

September 9, 1942: Nebraska forestry student Keith V. Johnson was on duty atop a forest fire lookout tower between Gold’s Beach and Brookings Oregon . Keith had memorized the silhouettes of Japanese long distance bombers and those of our own aircraft. He felt confident that he could spot and identify, friend or foe, almost immediately. It was cold on the coast this September morning , and quiet. The residents of the area were still in bed or preparing to head for work. Lumber was a large part of the industry in Brookings, just a few miles north of the California Oregon state lines.
 

The aircraft carried two incendiary 168 pound bombs and a crew of two.

Aboard the submarine the Captain’s voice boomed over the PA system, “Prepare to surface, aircrew report to your stations, wait for the open hatch signal” During training runs several subs were lost when hangar door were opened too soon and sea water rushed into the hangars and sank the boat with all hands lost. You could hear the change of sound as the bow of the I-25 broke from the depths, nosed over for its run on the surface. A loud bell signaled the “All Clear.” The crew assigned to the single engine Yokosuki E14Ys float equipped observation and light attack aircraft sprang into action. They rolled the plane out its hangar built next to the conning tower. The wings and tail were unfolded, and two 176 pound incendiary bombs were attached to the hard points under the wings. This was a small two passenger float plane with a nine cylinder 340 hp radial engine. It was full daylight when the Captain ordered the aircraft to be placed on the catapult. Warrant Officer Fujita started the engine, let it warm up, checked the magnetos and oil pressure. There was a slight breeze blowing and the seas were calm. A perfect day to attack the United States of America . When the gauges were in the green the pilot signaled and the catapult launched the aircraft. After a short climb to altitude the pilot turned on a heading for the Oregon coast.

Johnson was sweeping the horizon but could see nothing, he went back to his duties as a forestry agent which was searching for any signs of a forest fire The morning moved on. Every few minutes he would scan low, medium and high but nothing caught his eye.

The small Japanese float plane had climbed to several thousand feet of altitude for better visibility and to get above the coastal fog. The pilot had calculated land fall in a few minutes and right on schedule he could see the breakers flashing white as they hit the Oregon shores.

Johnson was about to put his binoculars down when something flashed in the sun just above the fog bank. It was unusual because in the past all air traffic had been flying up and down the coast, not aiming into the coast.

The pilot of the aircraft checked his course and alerted his observer to be on the lookout for a fire tower which was on the edge of the wooded area where they were supposed to drop their bombs. These airplanes carried very little fuel and all flights were in and out without any loitering. The plane reached the shore line and the pilot made a course correction 20 degrees to the north. The huge trees were easy to spot and certainly easy to hit with the bombs. The fog was very wispy by this time.

Warrant Officer Fujita is shown with his Yokosuka E14Y (Glen) float plane prior to his flight.

Johnson watched in awe as the small floatplane with a red meat ball on the wings flew overhead, the plane was not a bomber and there was no way that it could have flown across the Pacific, Johnson could not understand what was happening. He locked onto the plane and followed it as it headed inland.

The pilot activated the release locks so that when he could pickled the bombs they would release. His instructions were simple, fly at 500 feet, drop the bombs into the trees and circle once to see if they had started any fires and then head back to the submarine.

Johnson could see the two bombs under the wing of the plane and knew that they would be dropped. He grabbed his communications radio and called the Forest Fire Headquarters informing them of what he was watching unfold.

The bombs tumbled from the small seaplane and impacted the forests, the pilot circled once and spotted fire around the impact point. He executed an 180 degree turn and headed back to the submarine. There was no air activity, the skies were clear. The small float plane lined up with the surfaced submarine and landed gently on the ocean, then taxied to the sub. A long boom swung out from the stern. His crewman caught the cable and hooked it into the pickup attached to the roll over cage between the cockpits. The plane was swung onto the deck, The plane’s crew folded the wings and tail, pushed it into its hangar and secured the water tight doors. The I-25 submerged and headed back to Japan .

This event ,which caused no damage, marked the only time during World War II that an enemy plane had dropped bombs on the United States mainland. What the Japanese didn’t count on was coastal fog, mist and heavy doses of rain made the forests so wet they simply would not catch fire.

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