Tag Archives: Ireland

236 – August 24 – This Day in Baptist History Past


236 – August 24 – This Day in Baptist History Past

How the gospel spread in Ireland

Alexander Carson died on August 24, 1844. He was one of the most illustrious of the Irish Baptists. He was born in the north of Ireland in 1776. He settled as a Presbyterian pastor in 1798 at Tubbermore for £100 per year from the government. He was a Greek scholar, and had been willing to sign the “Standards” of the Church of Scotland, and could have become Professor of Greek in the University of Glasgow. He finally adopted Baptist principles, gave up his Presbyterian pastorate and salary, and gathered a little band of Baptists about him in a church without a meetinghouse, while he himself endured deep poverty. He was probably the leading scholar, writer and reasoner among the British Baptists. He aided in operating a Baptist seminary at Belina from 1830-1840. He had a stabalizing  effect when confusion prevailed that laid the ground work for the “Prayer Meeting Revival” that spread from America to Ireland in the late 1850s. Often the fruit of our labors does not come forth until we have entered into our rest after enduring the heat of the day of sowing and cultivating. During the decade of the 1650s, at least 11  Baptist churches were formed when Cromwell’s army over ran Ireland in 1649. Its leadership consisted of many Baptists. Many Baptists abounded in his forces. Among them were twelve governors of towns and cities, ten colonels, four lieutenant colonels, ten majors, twenty captains, and twenty-three officers on the civil list. Most of these churches were founded and sustained by the officers and soldiers in Cromwell’s army. London Baptists, responding to an appeal sent a number of preachers to Ireland. That’s how the Baptist foothold got its start in Ireland to begin with.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 349-50.

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160 – June 09 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

Imprisoned three times

 

The story of John Corbley is one of sacrifice and heroism. Born in Ireland in 1738, he came to America at the age of fourteen, settling first in eastern Pennsylvania, but later moving to Virginia, where he was soundly converted under the preaching of James Ireland. Shortly thereafter he became a Baptist preacher, and preached with such power that the Episcopal Establishment in Virginia considered him worthy of imprisonment, rewarding him shortly thereafter with a cell in the Culpeper jail. On the very site of that old jail there stands a thriving Baptist church today. When brought into court, John Corbley conducted his own defense, and was acquitted of all charges in 1768, although he suffered much abuse and physical violence later.

 

John Corbley was known as the ablest preacher of his day. For thirty years he directed the planting of Baptist churches in western Pennsylvania. Imprisoned three times and married three times, having buried two wives, these experiences of sunshine and shadow served only to deepen his spiritual life and magnify his usefulness. Active to the very end, he entered into rest June 9, 1803, his funeral sermon being preached by Elder David Phillips, pastor of the Peter’s Creek Baptist church. His mortal remains lie buried in the cemetery within the shadow of the old Goshen church, Whitley, Pennsylvania.

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I. (Thompson/Cummins) pp. 237.

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126– May 05 – This Day in Baptist History Past


“from my Palace in Culpeper.”
James Ireland was one of the great Baptist Church organizers in Virginia. “On one occasion in Culpeper County, while he was praying after a preaching service, he was seized by the collar by two men and given the ultimatum of promising not to preach there any longer or going to jail. He chose the latter alternative, and after a few days he was incarcerated in Culpeper. Through the jail bars he preached in spite of all the efforts to disturb him and his listeners. His detractors ran riding horses at a gallop through his hearers, urinated in his face as he preached, attempted to blow him up with gunpowder, and endeavored to suffocate him by burning brimstone and Indian pepper under the floor of his cell. A doctor and the jailer conspired to poison him. Ireland also was dunked in water and threatened with public whippings. When drunken rowdies were placed in his cell to harass him, he led several to personal faith in Jesus Christ. During this time, he wrote letters to individuals and churches which he headed “from my Palace in Culpeper.” This resulted in the salvation of many souls who heard his letters read as well as those who heard him preach. He said, “My prison then was a place in which I enjoyed much of the divine presence; a day seldom passed without some signal token and manifestation of the divine goodness toward me.”

Even while he preached out of prison, he continued to be threatened with beatings and dunkings.  On one occasion two women conspired to poison his family, which nearly resulted in Ireland’s own death and did cause the death of one of his eight children.  He bore the burden of ill health as a result of this maltreatment until his death May 5, 1806.”
Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 183-184
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287 – Oct. 14 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Liberty equals peace equals churches

 

1644 – William Penn, son of Admiral William Penn of England was born. In early life he embraced the tenets of the Quaker religion, and in 1666 was imprisoned in Cork, Ireland for practicing his faith. In 1668 he was put in the Tower prison in London and again in 1671 he was incarcerated in the Newgate Prison for six months for his outspoken faith. Following that he accepted in full payment for all obligations from the British Crown a great territory in North America called “Pennsylvania”, and on March 4, 1661 Charles II gave him the charter. Penn established a free colony for his Quaker brethren and in 1682, along with many emigrants, sailed for America. It was Penn who laid out the city of Philadelphia, and for two years, before returning to Great Britain he governed wisely, giving full religious freedom to all of the inhabitants of the colony. Several Baptists from England, Wales, and Ireland were among the first settlers. Thomas Dungan, who had fled Ireland because of severe persecution, had sailed to Newport, Rhode Island, to enjoy soul liberty and after several years, in 1684, hearing that a new colony had opened, migrated with a few others to Bucks County, near Philadelphia, and formed a Baptist church, along with a cemetery. Elias Keach, son of the famed English pastor Benjamin Keach, and one of Dungan’s converts referred to him as, “an ancient disciple and teacher among the Baptists.” Dungan finished his course in 1688 and passed the mantle on to Elias who founded the Pennepek church which, subsequently, became the foundation for all of the Baptist work throughout the colony. [William Cathcart, The Baptist Encyclopedia (Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881), 1:350. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. 563-64]  Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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160 — June 09 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Imprisoned three times

 

The story of John Corbley is one of sacrifice and heroism. Born in Ireland in 1738, he came to America at the age of fourteen, settling first in eastern Pennsylvania, but later moving to Virginia, where he was soundly converted under the preaching of James Ireland. Shortly thereafter he became a Baptist preacher, and preached with such power that the Episcopal Establishment in Virginia considered him worthy of imprisonment, rewarding him shortly thereafter with a cell in the Culpeper jail. On the very site of that old jail there stands a thriving Baptist church today. When brought into court, John Corbley conducted his own defense, and was acquitted of all charges in 1768, although he suffered much abuse and physical violence later.

 

John Corbley was known as the ablest preacher of his day. For thirty years he directed the planting of Baptist churches in western Pennsylvania. Imprisoned three times and married three times, having buried two wives, these experiences of sunshine and shadow served only to deepen his spiritual life and magnify his usefulness. Active to the very end, he entered into rest June 9, 1803, his funeral sermon being preached by Elder David Phillips, pastor of the Peter’s Creek Baptist church. His mortal remains lie buried in the cemetery within the shadow of the old Goshen church, Whitley, Pennsylvania.

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I. (Thompson/Cummins) pp. 237–238.

 

 

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35 – Feb. 04 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


A Name of Honour
John Dillahunty, descended from a noble French family.  His grandfather, David de la Hunte, was expelled from France, and fled to Holland and then later made his way to Ireland.  John’s father, Daniel Dillahunty, came to America in 1715 and settled in Kent County, Maryland.  It was there that John Dillahunty was born and later married Hannah Neal, a Quakeress.  John and Hanna later settled in New Bern North Carolina.
John and Hanna were soundly converted under the preaching of the Separate Baptists Shubal Stearns, Daniel Marshall, and others preaching the gospel in 1755. Adopting Baptist principles, and growing in maturity, John was granted a license to preach.  John preached frequently but like most Baptist preachers of the time engaged in the activities of the Revolutionary War.  After the war in 1794 he led six families to relocate in Middle Tennessee west of Nashville, where they established the Richland Creek Baptist Church.   John Dillahunty continued to serve the pastorate of the Richland Creek Baptist Church until his death in Nashville on February 4, 1816.
Dr. Dale R. Hart, adapted from:  This Day in Baptist History  III (David L. Cummins), pp. 71,72.

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