Tag Archives: integrity

David, the Shepherd King


 

Psalm 78:70-72

 

So he fed them according to the integrity of his heart; and guided them by the skilfulness of his hands,” Psalm 78:72.

 

 

This morning I read where a highly recruited high school football player was denied an invitation to a prominent NCAA team. He was not denied because the recruiters decided he did not have enough talent, nor was he denied because he had committed a serious crime. He was denied because of how he had mishandled a certain social media network. The university that was recruiting him determined that he would not be a benefit to its team—despite his extreme talent—because of his absence of character and integrity.

 

King David showed the opposite of this story. He did not have extreme leadership talent that had been tested in the arena of politics. The only experience he had was shepherding sheep; yet, God selected him to be the leader of His people. What was so great about David that made God choose Him? It was his character and integrity, developed by humbly watching sheep.

 

I am not sure what you or others might think of your own abilities, but history shows that God would rather have an unlearned peasant with integrity in His service, than a skilled workman who lacks character. God chooses the foolish things of the world to do His work so that no one will boast in anyone but God. (Read 1 Corinthians 1:26-31.)

 

 

JUST A THOUGHT

 

Will you pursue after God’s heart today?

 

Mark Clements

 

 

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HEBREWS – Undefiled


 

tāmiym

 

Psa_119:1 also stands out as a verse that speaks of being blessed: “Blessed are the undefiled in the way.” The Hebrew here for undefiled is tāmiym (H8549), an adjective that speaks of being “blameless, complete, and without blemish.”

 

In more than half its OT occurrences, tāmiym describes an animal to be sacrificed to the Lord, whether a ram, a bull, or a lamb, since such animals were required to be “without blemish” (e.g., Exo_29:1; Lev_4:3; Lev_14:10). It is also used to refer to time, as in a “whole” day (Jos_10:13), a “complete” seven Sabbaths (i.e., “weeks,” Lev_23:15), and a “full” year (Lev_25:30). When used in a moral sense, as it is here, tāmiym speaks of truth, integrity, virtue, uprightness, and righteousness. It appears, for example in Psa_18:23, where the psalmist again declares, “I was also upright before [God], and I kept myself from mine iniquity.” Solomon echoes this principle in Pro_11:5 : “The righteousness of the perfect shall direct his way: but the wicked shall fall by his own wickedness.” (See also Jos_24:14, “sincerity”, and Pro_2:21, “perfect”).

 

Added to this word is the word way (derek, February 23), once again a marked-out pattern of life. True bliss and contentment, then, come when our pattern of life is characterized by unblemished behavior. How ironic (and tragic) that the world looks for happiness in the exact opposite, pursuing it in lawlessness and just living their own way, but they will never find it there. Every young person should be challenged with this principle. They might think they will be happy by doing what they want, but they will not. Hopefully, they will not have to find out the hard way that true contentment, bliss, meaning, purpose, and peace will come by a life of unblemished behavior, a lifestyle that is characterized by purity. Charles Spurgeon put it well when he wrote in his classic The Treasury of David: “Doubtless, the more complete our sanctification the more intense our blessedness.” In other words, and let us mark this down: The holier we live, the more content we will be.

 

Scriptures for Study: Who is spoken of as being undefiled (“perfect”) in Gen_6:9; Gen_17:1? In Psa_15:1-5, what other traits characterize those who will abide with God (“uprightly” is tāmiym)?

 

 

 

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Confident Prayer


 

1 John 5:14, 15

 

And this is the confidence that we have in him, that, if we ask any thing according to his will, he heareth us,” 1 John 5:14.

 

Some have preached that God does not want you poor; He does not want you sick. Evidently, Lazarus, the beggar, covered in sores and Paul, the sick apostle, did not hear that message. Paul surrendered to God’s will and experienced satisfaction in the face of his many trials (2 Cor. 12:10).

 

In 1 John 5:14, John explains that the confidence must rest in the source of the blessings. We have had people promise us something, and we didn’t even consider it possible that the promise was valid because we didn’t trust the integrity of the promiser. In the heat of adversity, some make promises they know they can never fulfill.

 

We cannot always heal every hurt and carry every burden. Just like with Paul, often adversity is God’s best teacher. Sometimes all we can do is pray and hold the hand of the hurting while God carries them forward. Paul’s confidence came from personal experience: “Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content. I know both how to be abased, and I know how to abound: every where and in all things I am instructed both to be full and to be hungry, both to abound and to suffer need. I can do all things through Christ which strengthenenth me” (Phil. 4:11-13).

 

The confidence must be in Him, not in our ability to back Him into a corner and use twisted Scriptures to force God to come through with the desires of our heart.

 

 

Just Saying

 

Confiding in the confidant increases confidence and security.

 

Robert Brock

 

 

 

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