Tag Archives: German

188 – July 06 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

Johann G. Oncken

Se-Baptism does not satisfy German believers

On April 22, 1834, at Altona, across from Hamburg, Germany, Dr. Barnas Sears baptized, in the Elbe, Johann Gerhard Oncken and six others. Oncken, through the influence of Calvin Tibbs, a sea captain, had been led to adopt Baptist principles. Dr. Sears was destined to become distinguished among Baptists in America as an educator and author, but he is best known for this single event that took place thousands of miles away. Sears was born in Sandisfield, Massachusetts on Nov. 19, 1802, and as a youth was trained in the best schools and entered Brown University where he graduated with the highest honors of his class in 1825. He finished his theological training at Newton Theological Institution and was called to pastor the First Baptist Church of Hartford, Connecticut. After two years he became a professor at Hamilton Literary and Theological Institution until 1833 when he resigned so he could travel to Germany to further his training. Providentially God had been moving on the heart of J.G. Oncken concerning the necessity of believer’s immersion but there was no one to perform the ordinance. He had written to Baptists in England and one had suggested “Se-Baptism” (i.e. self-baptism), but Oncken could not accept this as being the will of God. How wonderful that God sent Dr. Sears at this time to meet the need. Upon his return Dr. Sears became President of Newton Theological Seminary. In 1848 he was elected secretary and executive agent of the Massachusetts Board of Education. He later was chosen as the Trustee of the Peabody Trust for the cause of the education in the South after the Civil War. He later moved to Staunton, Virginia and served the Baptist people there until his death on July 6, 1880.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: adapted From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 276-77.

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107– April 17 – This Day in Baptist History


German U-Boat Sinks the Zam Zam – 144 missionaries on board
Florence Almen had gone from America in 1936 and had served for a term in French Equatorial Africa. After returning to her homeland for a year of furlough. Florence said her farewells to family and friends and boarded the Zam Zam on March 21, 1941, for her return to her labors.  The ship carried 201 passengers, including 144 missionaries.   They made their way to Baltimore and picked up additional crew and then continued on to Brazil. Leaving Brazil for Cape Town on April 9, they traveled without lights and maintained radio silence, for the German U-boats were very active. All seemed to go well until April 17, just two days from the arrival in Cape Town. A terrible vibration rocked the ship, and the screaming crash of shells awakened passengers and crew. The old ship was under attack.
They found that their lifeboat had been hit, but they finally discovered another.  As the lifeboat pulled away from the listing Zam, they found that it, too, had been riddled with gun fire and was filling with water. Florence Almen did not know how to swim, but heroically to lighten the load, she jumped overboard. As she did so, she cried out to the Lord, “I’ll be seeing your face today, Lord Jesus.” She further testified, “I wasn’t alone. God was there. Underneath were the everlasting arms. I felt His Presence—really real.” In a short time, they heard a motor and discovered that the German captain of the raider (the Tamesis) had sent a launch to pick up those in the water.
Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from:  This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 156-157
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33 – February 02 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

 

Samuel_Francis_Smith Samuel Francis Smith

A Baptist who loved America

1832 – This was the year that the 23 year old Baptist seminarian, Samuel Francis Smith at Andover Theological Institute, penned those words to the patriotic hymn “America.”  He was translating from an old German hymnbook and began to think of his own great land.  “Our fathers’ God to Thee,/ Author of liberty,/ To Thee we sing; Long may our land be bright/ With Freedom’s holy light;/ Protect us by Thy might,/ Great God, our King.”  Following his graduation he became editor of The Baptist Magazine, and though he pastored with success, his main interest was to advance the missions cause and wrote the great missions song at that time, “The Morning Light is Breaking.”  He was the Editor of Christian Review and later the Missionary Union.  He visited many mission fields.  His son, Dr. D.A. W. Smith, served the Lord in Burma in 1863.  Samuel married the granddaughter of the renowned Dr. Hezekiah Smith.  Irving Berlin wrote that other great patriotic hymn “God Bless America” which is now being sung between 7th innings at major league ball parks, which is a great delight.  However, when Berlin was asked if it had a religious connotation, he said, “No.”  What a difference between the natural man who writes for funds only, and a young man who writes from a heart that is filled with love for God and country.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 44

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357 – Dec. 23 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Anabaptist martyrs and leaders

 

 Spread_of_the_Anabaptists_1525-1550

 

1527 – Simon Stumpf, an Anabaptist was banished from Zurich. Other leaders among the Anabaptists were Johannes Denck, Michael Sattler, Andreas Carlstadt, Johannes Hut, and Jacob Hutter. Even though these men were not as well known as Balthasar Hubmaier, Felix Manz, Conrad Grebel and George Blaurock, they were still outstanding Anabaptist leaders in their own right. Denck was known as the “Apostle of Love,” Michael Sattler as “A Superlative Witness,” and Andreas Carlstadt greatly influenced Hubmaier with his brilliant theology. Another that needs to be known by all is Pilgram Marpeck.  John C. Wenger, has called him the greatest of all the South German and Swiss Anabaptist leaders. After his conversion he was forced to become a real “pilgrim”, and he has been called, “a wandering citizen of heaven.” Marpeck was saved just a few months following the martyrdom of Michael Sattler when he was the mining engineer of Rottenburg, Germany. But when he united with the Anabaptists he lost his position on Jan. of 1528, and three months later, he lost his possessions, as they were confiscated. Things continued to degenerate, and on Dec. 18 the man of God was expelled from the city, and fled to Strassburg with his wife where there was a strong contingent of Anabaptists. Marpeck soon became the outstanding leader among them but his writings were banned by the authorities and he was imprisoned. He debated with Martin Bucer, and stood for the separation of Church and State, and believer’s baptism. He was one of the few Anabaptist leaders that died a natural death. It was in Dec.1556. [This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 701-02. William R. Estep, The Anabaptist Story (Nashville: Broadman Press, 1963), p. 10.]

 

Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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292 – Oct. 19 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The martyrs of Italy

1562 – Giulio Guirlanda was the first person who was put to death for Christ in the City of Venice, Italy, though several had suffered martyrdom in the territories of that Republic. He sank into the deep waters, calling upon the Lord Jesus in the fortieth year of his age. The next to follow him in the steps of His Savior was Antonio Ricetto, who was a most honorable man of God. Great efforts were made by the senate to induce him to recant, they even used his little son to beg him to, but it was all in vain. He prayed for those who put him to death, and commended his soul to his Savior as he was drowned on Feb. 15, 1566. The next martyr was Francesco Spinula; he was drowned ten days after Ricetto. But the most distinguished of all the martyrs of Venice was Fra Baldo Lupetino. He was of a noble and ancient family, became a monk, and rose to a high rank in his Order. After proclaiming the gospel in and out of Italy, he was thrown into prison by the inquisitor of the pope’s legate where he wallowed for nearly twenty years. The Protestant German princes interceded with the senate for his life; but the pope and his inquisitor demanded death-which he met with firmness, and great peace. In their report in 1928, the Baptists of Italy spoke of their “glorious roll of martyrs.” We rejoice that Baptist missionaries are once again carrying the good news to Italy. Please pray for them. [J.M. Cramp, Baptist History (London: Elliot Stock, 1870), p. 121. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. 572-73].   Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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187 – July, 06 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Se-Baptism does not satisfy German believers

 

On April 22, 1834, at Altona, across from Hamburg, Germany, Dr. Barnas Sears baptized, in the Elbe, Johann Gerhard Oncken and six others. Oncken, through the influence of Calvin Tibbs, a sea captain, had been led to adopt Baptist principles. Dr. Sears was destined to become distinguished among Baptists in America as an educator and author, but he is best known for this single event that took place thousands of miles away. Sears was born in Sandisfield, Massachusetts on Nov. 19, 1802, and as a youth was trained in the best schools and entered Brown University where he graduated with the highest honors of his class in 1825. He finished his theological training at Newton Theological Institution and was called to pastor the First Baptist Church of Hartford, Connecticut. After two years he became a professor at Hamilton Literary and Theological Institution until 1833 when he resigned so he could travel to Germany to further his training. Providentially God had been moving on the heart of J.G. Oncken concerning the necessity of believer’s immersion but there was no one to perform the ordinance. He had written to Baptists in England and one had suggested “Se-Baptism” (i.e. self-baptism), but Oncken could not accept this as being the will of God. How wonderful that God sent Dr. Sears at this time to meet the need. Upon his return Dr. Sears became President of Newton Theological Seminary. In 1848 he was elected secretary and executive agent of the Massachusetts Board of Education. He later was chosen as the Trustee of the Peabody Trust for the cause of the education in the South after the Civil War. He later moved to Staunton, Virginia and served the Baptist people there until his death on July 6, 1880.

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: adapted From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 276-77.

 

 

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The Church – English Word


CHURCH – WHAT IT IS

The English Word “Church”

My intent is to show what the Church is by using a methodical study. We need to begin by defining the word. I will be using references that are experts in language and linguistics.

The Word Defined

Overbey in his book (The Meaning of Ecclesia in the N.T. p.7) says, “According to most scholars the word church comes from a Greek word meaning “the Lord’s” with the word house usually understood.” This is taken from the Greek word “kuriakos” which comes from the word “kurios,” meaning “the Lord’s.”

Thayer says, (Thayer’s Lexicon, pl 365) “A Biblical and ecclesiastical word – of or belonging to the Lord, or relating to the Lord.”

Overbey asserts, “Time and the peculiarities of each language had its effect on the word (kuriakos) but the word still remained recognizable. In English it is church, in Old English cirice, in German Kirche, in Scottish kirk, and in Old Scandinavian kyrka.”

The Meaning of the Greek word “Ecclesia”

I want you to remember the word “Church” and it’s meaning while we examine the word “ecclesia”. As previously stated, most scholars agree that the English word “church” comes from a Greek word (kiriakos) which means “the Lord’s” with the word house usually understood.

Here is the etymology of the word Ecclesia.

  • Ek – out of.

  • Kaleo – to call.

  • Hence, a “calling out.”

The word church, according to Overbey, appears in the King James Bible because of Rule 3, established by King James. Rule 3 states – The old ecclesiastical words to kept.

  1. K. Cross makes this observation. “In Acts 19:39-41 the term is used twice. Once to refer to the ‘lawful assembly’ which was called out of the citizens of Ephesus to handle legal matters in the city. The other to refer to the assembly that had been called together to run Paul and his companions out of town. In either case the assembly, or ecclesia (for this is the word used here), was a called out group, called together for a specific purpose, and local in nature. This was the common usage of the term and always the proper definition of an ecclesia. THIS IS WHAT OUR LORD SAID HE WOULD BE BUILDING.”

  1. K. Cross continues, “If Jesus Christ had intended to build another kind of company there were other words in the language He could have used. He could have used the word ‘Synagoga,’ a term without such limitations and yet designating an assembly. It would certainly have been more fitting for a ‘universal company.’ He could have also used the word ‘panagris’ if He had a solemn assembly in mind of a massive and festal nature. But these were rejected in favor of the most limiting term in the Greek language with reference to an assembly; a term that can only be properly interpreted as an assembly local in nature.”

  1. K. Cross further states the word ecclesia is more than a mere assembly. The word is a compounding of two words. Kaleo, ‘to call” and ‘ek’, meaning out, or literally ‘to call out.’ Thus, an ‘ekklesia’ is a Called out assembly, implying some conditions. The Lord did not call all Christians in the area that cared to assemble into His ‘ekklesia,’ but he was very selective about it in Matthew 4:17-22; Matthew 9:1 John 1:43,44 and on until He had 120 in that assembly by the time he went back to the Father. I Cor. 12:28 says that ‘God hath set some in the church (ekklesia)…,’ not all. The same passage states that He set the apostles in the ‘ekklesia,’ and on the occasion when the apostles were chosen there was quite a congregation of disciples present of whom he chose the apostles – and Paul says the apostles, not the crowd, were set in the ‘ekklesia’.

Roy Mason asserts, “…I submit the proposition that the church that Jesus founded was the local assembly, and that to use the word ecclesia to designate a ‘universal,’ or ‘invisible’ church is to pervert its meaning, and to fall into serious error.” (The Church That Jesus Built, Mason, p. 26).

A. C. Dayton said, “The Greek ‘ekklesia’ consisted of certain individuals, who, when assembled and organized, constituted an official body for the transaction of such business as might come before them. It was not merely an assembly, but an official assembly, consisting of persons specifically qualified, and who had each his specific rights and duties as a member of the ekklesia to which was intrusted the management of public business; but the ekklesia were called out from the mass… Every assembly was not an ekklesia, nor was every ekklesia an ekklesia of Christ”. (Theodosia Earnest, pp. 72,73).

This leaves the question, why does the King James Bible use the word Church instead of the word congregation or the word assembly. I have heard those that would use the word assembly instead of Church. I have heard the arguments put forth. Here is what I have to say about the issue. Jesus said “I will build my ecclesia – assembly.

So Wednesday afternoon, I leave my house and walk to the assembly. One of my neighbors happens to be in their yard and ask me where I am going. I say, I’m going to the assembly. Reply – oh, the school assembly, No – Oh, the assembly at 3rd St and 4th Ave. No, I’m not going to the corner tavern. So what assembly are you going to? Church (THE LORD’S). My neighbors reply – why didn’t you say that to begin with? My reply – I wanted to be correct in usage whether you understood it or not. I believe that the word Church was used before they began building Church buildings. I also believe that the assembly we attend is “The Lord’s” assembly. The word Church is proper in declaring to others that we are attending “The Lords’ assembly.

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