Tag Archives: general

Nobody knew the war was over


Another great american the attributes victory to God.

Nobody knew the war was over

andrew-jacksonAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

500 men, women and children were massacred at Fort Mims, Alabama, on August 30, 1813, by the Red Stick Creek Indians, who were supplied with weapons by the British.

It was the largest Indian massacre in American history.

A rumor had been circulated that British were paying cash for American scalps.

Colonel Andrew Jackson defeated the Red Stick Creek Indians at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, March 27, 1814.

The Creeks ceded half of Alabama to the U.S. Government.

Promoted to General, Andrew Jackson was sent 150 miles west to defend New Orleans from the British.

Though the War of 1812 was effectively over two weeks earlier with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, December 24, 1814, news had not yet reached New Orleans.

On January 8, 1815, in the last battle of the War of 1812, nearly 10,000 battle-hardened British soldiers advanced under cover of darkness and heavy fog.

They were intending to surprise General Andrew Jackson’s Tennessee and Kentucky sharpshooters, aided by French pirate Jean Lafitte and his men.

As the British neared, the fog suddenly lifted and the Americans opened fire.

In just a half an hour 2,042 British were killed or wounded, while only 13 Americans were killed.

Considered the greatest American land victory of the war, General Andrew Jackson wrote to Robert Hays, January 26, 1815, regarding the Battle of New Orleans:

“It appears that the unerring hand of Providence shielded my men from the shower of balls, bombs, and rockets, when every ball and bomb from our guns carried with them a mission of death.”

General Jackson told his aide-de-camp Major Davezac of his confidence before the Battle:

“I was sure of success, for I knew that God would not give me previsions of disaster, but signs of victory. He said this ditch can never be passed. It cannot be done.”

Andrew Jackson wrote to Secretary of War James Monroe, February 17, 1815:

“Heaven, to be sure, has interposed most wonderfully in our behalf, and I am filled with gratitude, when I look back to what we have escaped.”

The Treaty of Ghent was ratified by the U.S. Senate, February 16, 1815.

The British had considered capturing Mobile, Alabama, but on February 26, 1815, Napoleon escaped from the Island of Elba and all British troops had to be immediately returned to Europe.

For the next one hundred days, events in Europe cascaded toward the massive Battle of Waterloo.

President Madison proclaimed for the United States a National Day of Thanksgiving to Almighty God, March 4, 1815:

“No people ought to feel greater obligations to celebrate the goodness of the Great Disposer of Events…distinguished by multiplied tokens of His benign interposition.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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Ulysses S. Grant – Soldier, President, man of faith


ulysses-grant-pictureAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

Ulysses S. Grant was commissioned JULY 25, 1866, as General of the Army, the first ever to hold that rank and wear the four silver star insignia.

Popularity from Civil War victories resulted in him being chosen as Republican candidate for President in 1868.

Earlier, while farming in Missouri, Grant inherited a slave from his wife’s father, a 35-year-old man named William Jones. Though they were in a dire financial situation, Grant freed his slave in 1859 rather than sell him for badly needed money.

Grant signed the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871, limiting Democrat vigilante and lynching activity of freed slaves in the South.

Elected the 18th President, Grant supported ratification of the 15th Amendment guaranteeing freed slaves the right to vote.

Grant stated in his Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1873:

“Under Providence I have been called a second time to act as Executive over this great nation…

The effects of the late civil strife have been to free the slave and make him a citizen. Yet he is not possessed of the civil rights which citizenship should carry with it. This is wrong, and should be corrected. To this correction I stand committed.”

Grant worked to stabilize the country’s currency by having it backed by gold, as during the Civil War the Federal Government printed an excess of paper money with no backing except ‘faith’ in the Federal Government.

In his First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1869, President Ulysses S. Grant stated:

“Every dollar of Government indebtedness should be paid in gold…

It looks as though Providence had bestowed upon us a strong box in the precious metals locked up in the sterile mountains of the far West, and which we are now forging the key to unlock, to meet the very contingency that is now upon us.”

Of his Indian policy, Grant stated in his First Annual Message, December 6, 1869:

“The Society of Friends…succeeded in living in peace with the Indians in the early settlement of Pennsylvania…

These considerations induced me to give the management of a few reservations of Indians to them.”

President Grant stated in his 2nd Annual Message, December 5, 1870:

“Religious denominations as had established missionaries among the Indians…are expected to watch over them and aid them…to Christianize and civilize the Indians, and to train him in the arts of peace.”

President Grant wrote to Congress, January 1, 1871:

“Indians of the country should be encouraged…to adopt our form of government, and it is highly desirable that they become self-sustaining, self-relying, Christianized, and civilized.”

President Grant stated in his 3rd Annual Message, December 4, 1871:

“I recommend liberal appropriations to carry out the Indian peace policy, not only because it is humane and Christianlike…but because it is right.”

Grant, being the youngest President to that date, 46 years old, had a military training of trusting subordinates, leaving him ill-prepared for dealing with political intrigues, hidden motives and greed of Washington politicians.

As a result, a number of those in his Administration were involved in granting government favors and monopolies in exchange for bribes and insider deals.

Called the “Gilded Age” by Mark Twain, a friend of Grant’s, America saw:

-Immigrants arriving in record numbers;

-Railroads crossing the nation;

-Industry and manufacturing expanded;

-Iron, steel production rising dramatically;

-Western resources of lumber, gold and silver; and the

-Oil industry replacing the use of whale blubber oil, saving the whale.

Industrialists, called “Robber Barons,” amassed great wealth by providing more goods to people at cheaper prices, raising the country’s standard of living:

John Jacob Astor (real estate, fur);
Andrew Carnegie (steel);
James Fisk (finance);
Henry Flagler (railroads, oil);
Jay Gould (railroads);
Edward Harriman (railroads);
Andrew Mellon (finance, oil);
J.P. Morgan (finance, industrial);
John D. Rockefeller (oil);
Charles M. Schwab (steel); and
Cornelius Vanderbilt (water transport, railroads).

Ulysses S. Grant did not personally profit from being in office and even went bankrupt as a result of naively trusting investors.

Struggling financially, and suffering from throat cancer in his later years from cigar smoking, Grant was encouraged by Mark Twain to write his Memoirs of the Civil War in order to provide an income for his wife after his death.

Encouraged by the outpouring of support from people across the country, Ulysses S. Grant, who was a Methodist, wrote in 1884:

“I believe in the Holy Scriptures, and whoso lives by them will be benefited thereby. Men may differ as to the interpretation, which is human, but the Scriptures are man’s best guide…

I did not go riding yesterday, although invited and permitted by my physicians, because it was the Lord’s day, and because I felt that if a relapse should set in, the people who are praying for me would feel that I was not helping their faith by riding out on Sunday….

Yes, I know, and I feel very grateful to the Christian people of the land for their prayers in my behalf. There is no sect or religion, as shown in the Old or New Testament, to which this does not apply.”

Just days after delivering his final manuscript to the printer, Ulysses S. Grant died, July 23, 1885.

Nine years earlier, President Grant wrote to the Editor of the Sunday School Times in Philadelphia, June 6, 1876:

“Your favor of yesterday asking a message from me to the children and the youth of the United States, to accompany your Centennial number, is this morning received.

My advice to Sunday schools, no matter what their denomination, is: Hold fast to the Bible as the sheet anchor of your liberties; write its precepts in your hearts, and practice them in your lives.

To the influence of this Book are we indebted for all the progress made in true civilization, and to this must we look as our guide in the future.

‘Righteousness exalteth a nation; but sin is a reproach to any people.’ Yours respectfully, U.S. Grant.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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116 – April 26 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The General’s Right Hand Man

 

Prior to the Civil War there were few black Baptist preachers in the North or the South.  But it is a thrill to read of the exploits of those few that existed.  “Uncle” Harry Cowan was a slave to Thomas L. Cowan.  On one occasion Mr. Cowan was present for a funeral where his servant was to preach, and he was shocked at Uncle Harry’s grasp of the Scripture.  This resulted in the master granting “privilege papers” allowing Uncle Harry to preach, marry, and baptize any one who makes a profession of Faith.”  In time Uncle Harry’s success caused his master to extend this privilege of preaching wherever his slave had “protection.”  The blessing of God was attendant upon this choice servant of the Lord, and literally thousands of both races heard him gladly.  His ministry extended from before the Civil War, during that awful conflict, and following it as well.  In fact, during the Civil War, Uncle Harry served as Confederate General Joseph Johnston’s body servant.  He preached every night during the war, with the exception of May 2, 1863, when General Stonewall Jackson fell in battle.  He served General Johnston faithfully until the General’s surrender on April 26, 1865

 

 

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RE: KINDS OF BAPTISTS AND THEIR ORIGIN


Jesus baptised by John the Baptist by going all the way under the water and coming back up out of the water. Yet the name Baptist did not come from John the Baptist. We find co-operation of churches in the New Testament. Acts 8:14 reveals the church of Jerusalem co-operating in Samaria where Philip was preaching the gospel and souls were being saved and baptised. We find Peter going to the Gentiles and some circumcised believers were with him when he preached and souls were saved and Peter asked the circumcised believers from the church in Jerusalem if they would forbid the baptising of these believers. The church in Jerusalem sent Barnabas to the church in Antioch for the purpose of co-operation.

1. ASSOCIATION BAPTISTS, A.D. 33.

Examples of the co-operation and association that existed in these first century (A.D.) churches are found int the book of Acts and also referenced in II Cor. 8:19-23.
Co-operation with a minimum of inter-church organisation has characterised Association Baptists in history and no doubt accounts for so little being known of their associational work of the past, though no doubt such existed.

2. AMERICAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 1905.

This work began with the Baptist General Association, 1905, which was a perpetuation of associational principles practised by Baptists of many association through the centuries. The name was changed to American Baptist Association in 1925, when the Baptist Missionary Association of Texas came into this work.

3. AMERICAN BAPTIST CONVENTION, 1814.

Was organised as the Baptist General Convention and became known as the Triennial Convention. A split came in 1844 which resulted in the Southern Baptist Convention in 1845. Thus, those of the North came to be known as Northern Baptists. The Northern Baptist Conventions was adopted as the name of this group in 1907, and in 1950 they officially changed their name to the American Baptist Convention.

4. NORTH AMERICAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 1950.

This resulted from a split in the American Baptist Association. Several issues brought on the split. One was the matter of representation. The American Baptist Association had always left it to the representing church as to whom they would choose to represent them. Some sought to change this, and also sought to change the matter of voting to proxy voting by non-represented church. This had never been the practice of the ABA. Still another issue seemed to be the matter of Seminaries and schools. Some thought they should not be churched-owned, but owned by the Association.

5. SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION, 1845.

This was a split from the Triennial Convention over the slavery question. They held to all the evils of convention-ism: money basis of representation, boards to hire and fire missionaries, pressure programs, interference in local church affairs.

6. NATIONAL BAPTIST CONVENTION (AFRICAN-AMERICAN), 1880.

7. FREEWILL BAPTISTS, 1770, FOUNDED BY BENJAMIN RANDALL.

8. GENERAL BAPTISTS, 1714.

9. NATIONAL BAPTIST EVANGELICAL LIFE AND SOUL SAVING ASSEMBLY OF U.S.A., 1921.

10. NATIONAL PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CONVENTION OF THE U.S.A. (AFRICAN-AMERICAN), 1907

11. NORTH AMERICAN BAPTIST GENERAL CONFERENCE (GERMAN), 1860.

12. PRIMITIVE BAPTISTS (HARDSHELL), 1825-1832, FOUNDED BY PARKER.

Most of these have deviated from the truth of God’s Word to such a great extent that some would not be recognized as a Baptist church and others have lost their candlestick and can no longer be considered the “CHURCH THAT JESUS BUILT.” To be a true New Testament Church they must maintain the doctrines that Jesus, Paul and the Apostles delivered to the Churches.Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

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