Tag Archives: furlough

77 – March – 18 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST



Edward Payson Scott
The Power of Gospel music
1913 – Dr. Edward W. Clark passed away on this memorable day.  He and his wife were the ones that followed Edward Payson Scott to the music loving head-hunting Naga’s in Assam, India.  Payson went with a Bible and a violin in 1869, and the first twelve Naga’s that approached him changed their fierce attitude to joy as they heard him play, “Am I a Soldier of the Cross?”  However, it wasn’t a spear that killed him but the cholera, just a year later.  The Clark’s not only gained entry to the Naga’s but penetrated further South into an even more vicious head-hunting tribe, the Ao-Nagas and spent forty-two years in that land with only two furloughs.  Clark had been born in New York on Feb. 25, 1830.  Receiving Christ early in life as a farm boy, he looked forward to Christian service as he graduated from Brown University and then from seminary in Rochester, N.Y.  He married Mary Mead and served a short pastorate in Logansport, Indiana and became the editor of a Christian publication when he was asked to take charge of a mission printing press in Sibsagor, the ancient capital of Assam, India.  The accomplishments of Dr. and Mrs. Clark surely deserve to rank among those of the great missionary pioneers.  It was sometime before they could settle at Molung among fierce savages.  Clark found time to do a great deal of literary work.  He reduced their language to writing, translated some of the gospels, and printed many books for use in their schools.  His last work was the Ao-Naga-English Dictionary, upon which he worked the last seven years of his life.  He was honored with three honorary doctorates but considered his greatest honor to simply be called a servant of the Lord Jesus Christ.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, pp. 110.
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256 – Sept. 13 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The Faith of the Lepers

 

1876 – Dr. James M. Haswell died after forty-one years of missionary service in Burma, with his dear wife Jane Mason, who he had married on August 23, 1835, and sailed for their chosen field one month later. He was more fruit from the Hamilton Theological Institute in Bennington, Vermont. Dr.Haswell mastered the Burmese language and then turned to the Pegulan dialect to reach the 80,000 of that tribe. He only took two furloughs, one in 1849 and another in 1867 and those were used to spur interest in missions. He was most diligent that his son James should follow him which he did but tragically died of cholera but a year after his father in 1877. But the Haswell vision lived on through their daughter Susan who founded the Maulmein Leper Colony in which she invested sixty years of her life. The government gave the land and the lepers themselves built the thatched roof buildings with, in some cases, stumps for hands and feet. It stood for years as a memorial to her and the faith of the lepers. Untold thousands were saved. [A.H. Burlingham, The Story of Baptist Missions in Foreign Lands (St. Louis: C.R. Barns Publishing Co., 1892), p. 944. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 501-02.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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40 – Feb. 09 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


A Missionary Statesman
The Donnelsons, Fred and Effie after their second furlough and regaining strength, were able to return to Shanghai, China, where they had served in a long and blessed ministry. They returned to the Shanghai Baptist Tabernacle, and it was even possible for their son Paul and his wife to join them.  They began a radio ministry, and the church grew rapidly. The furlough had come after the Donnelsons had been interned in a prison camp for many months with some professionals and other missionaries at great suffering because of the Japanese invasion of China.  They were finally repatriated through diplomatic efforts and returned on the Gripsholm.
After their return to China the Communists began driving into south China and at the last minute, in 1949, at the insistence of their congregation they evacuated. This would be the last time they would see their adopted land, but God was not done with His servant.
In time Fred Donnelson became known as Mr. Missions as the Baptist Bible Fellowship split from the World Fundamental Baptist Missionary Fellowship in 1950. He saw the Fellowship grow from fewer than twenty missionaries serving on four fields to over 300 on twenty-six fields.  But the years have a way of catching up with all earthlings, and in 1968 Dr. Fred Donnelson stepped down from the role in which God had so used him.  His influence surely did not cease, for he continued to speak in Christian colleges and churches urging young people to consider preaching the Gospel where Christ is not known.
On February 9, 1974, the Lord saw fit to call His servant home.
Dr. Dale R. Hart, adapted from:  This Day in Baptist History III (David L. Cummins), pp. 81-82.

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29 – Jan. 29 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Evangelism was foremost on her mind.
 
Jan. 29, 1896 – A newly erected building was dedicated in Sendai, Japan through the efforts of a lady missionary by the name of Lavina Mead of New Lisbon, Wisconsin. Lavina had originally gone to Ingole, India but found the field to severe. At the outset, the school housed fifteen girls, a Bible woman, and two helpers. As time went on, the enrollment increased, and the impact of the gospel was felt throughout the area until four hundred children were enrolled in seven Sunday schools. These schools were conducted by personnel trained by Miss Mead at the school. Education was only a means to the end for Miss Mead, for evangelism was foremost on her mind. “Winning” of souls to her Lord Jesus Christ was ever her first aim in life,” as was reported in the Thirty-first Annual Report of the Women’s Missionary Society of 1902. For eleven years she directed the work in Sendai, and then before her furlough, she was assigned to Chofu-Shimonoseki, where her ministry resulted in house meetings, community Bible classes, women’s and children’s meetings, and the establishment of Sunday schools. A well deserved furlough ended that phase of her life. In 1908 she returned to Japan’s second largest city, Osaka, and founded the Women’s Bible Training School, where she served.  for the remaining eighteen years of her overseas ministry. With, unending energy she labored, and within five years, fourteen young women had graduated from the training school she had established, as teachers in women’s evangelism or as pastors’ wives. Other buildings were built and dedicated, and not wanting to be a burden she resigned.
[This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press. pp. 55-56. Tai Shigaki, American Baptist Quarterly (BarreVt.: Northlight Studio Pres, Inc., 1993), 12:261.] Prepared by Dr. Greg Dixon

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19 – Jan. 19 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


“You are who you are when you are totally alone.”
 Dr. E. Robert Jordan was saved on Jan. 1948.  Because of the length of this story it will be concluded later.  Jan. 22, 1949, marks the date of his wedding to Mrs. Jordan, and his exciting story will be concluded on that date.  When he was two years old his mother had an adulterous affair, ending an abusive marriage.  His father remarried, but the step-mother was cruel.  When only three, he and his five year old sister ran away, taking turns carrying their one year old sister all the way across Dayton, OH to their grandparent’s home.  Eventually, a court sent them to an orphanage.  In the orphanage, E. Robert learned the “pecking order.” He was beaten by the bigger boys until he was able to fend for himself.  He hated school and was a constant irritant to his teachers.  At fifteen he was in the sixth grade.  When Pearl Harbor and Dec. 7 happened, his “cottage father” signed for him, and in 1942  the boy found himself headed for the Great Lakes Naval Station.  He now learned of the “pecking order” in the military.  Early he decided to climb the ranks, but drinking became a way of life for him.  After getting into a fight, he was ordered to represent the Navy against the Marines in boxing competition.  He became the middleweight boxing champion of the Navy.  Jordan was assigned to the Pacific Theater and saw first – hand Japanese suicide attacks, one destroying his gun turret, killing all of his men.  His drinking worsened, the only one he hated more than the Japs was his step-mother who he decided to kill when on furlough, but his plans were thwarted time and again.  Jordan re-enlisted and was assigned to a cruiser and the training of 72 new recruits.  While docked in Bermuda, a hippie told him, “You are who you are when you are totally alone.” (to be continued).
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins, pp. 39-40.

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