Tag Archives: freedom of religion

Immigrants Not Taught Freedom Of Religion


Immigrants Not Taught Freedom Of Religion

schlafly 2 BY PHYLLIS SCHLAFLY

Liberals keep trying to sneak political correctness into America any way they can. We should not be surprised that they have targeted the study materials for the civics portion of the naturalization exam. Study materials have now changed references to our First Amendment Freedom of Religion with the weaker and more politically correct expression Freedom of Worship. While the difference may seem small, the implications are huge.

Even foreign dictatorships have no problem with offering their citizens Freedom of Worship. This is because Freedom of Worship implies only the freedom to express personal religious beliefs when your are inside your church after you have closed the door, or are within the confines of government-approved places of worship for government-approved meetings and events. This inaccurate and very limited view of religious liberty teaches that faith should be a private affair confined to designated areas. They want people to think that their freedom ends whenever they leave the four walls of their church. This certainly is not how our Founders envisioned the intrinsic constitutional rights of all Americans. Our American right to the Free Expression of Religion allows real freedom in choosing where and how we express our faith. Our First Amendment does not allow excessive government regulation about Freedom of Religion.

Unfortunately, the official study materials for the naturalization exam do not reflect this right as it is given in the Constitution. It is especially important that those preparing for and taking the U.S. naturalization exam have an accurate understanding of the foundational freedoms that they will enjoy as citizens of the United States. Many public schools are also starting to embrace this watered-down version of our most basic right, in order to indoctrinate the next generation with a distorted view of American government. It’s time to stand up to these attacks and make sure that our children know that our U.S. Constitution guarantees the fundamental right of Freedom of Religion.

 


We recommend Who Killed the American Family?


Contributing Editor, Phyllis Schlafly, is the Founder and President of Eagle Forum, a national radio show host, and a best-selling author.

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Author of Liberty or Not?


Author of Liberty or Not?

Steve FarrellLIBERTY LETTERS WITH STEVE FARRELL

Is God the author of liberty, or not?

A valid, and need I say, vital question.

But in this age of secularism, humanism, and socialism, just try mixing God and government in the same breath and get ready for the snickers, sneers, hisses, and guffaws for daring to exercise one’s free speech as regards this off-limits, dangerous, homophobic subject.

Yet the right to free speech and freedom of religion is ours, and the question a must for all to at least consider.

A number of years ago, the dean of a Social Science Department scolded me in BIG RED LETTERS, highlighted by a BIG WITH EMOTION lecture, for infusing God and morality (via quoting the Founders) into a paper (and my portion of a group discussion) that focused on the historical foundation of ethics in American government.

The report was “very well written,” he condescendingly noted, “but inappropriate! No American university would accept your approach as valid!” The grade, a GPA destroying D minus.

I had no doubt about his assessment of America’s universities. (1) Admittedly, I half expected the unfair grade from this ‘ethical’ liberal who put political prejudice ahead of academic honesty. I was, after all, outspoken in class, hard-hitting in my school newspaper columns, and decidedly Christian and conservative. Here was his big chance to make an example of me, to frighten others into submission. He took it.

And it hurt, and he won, or so he thought.

But what of it? Early on, I decided that when it came to ‘getting ahead,’ my religion and morality would come first, and so I would be honest, come hell or high water or D minuses.

Pooh! on his humanistic ethics! “Thou shalt not bear false witness,” is an uncompromising command from the Deity—not something to be abandoned to appease such professors, politicians in my case, nor to settle scores and teach Christian conservatives a lesson about ‘how things are” in academia, like it or not, as he chose to do.

With ethics, however, you can do far worse and not think twice about it. Because when it comes to ethics, the ends justify the means; utilitarianism outbids God-given rights; morality (if the word hasn’t been outlawed) mutates into relativism; and so we have the kind of religion the mass murdering French and communist revolutionaries practiced — and in full fellowship, the secular religion of the American courts, where without conscience men and women abandon their oath of office to promote perversity and socialism, the very things at odds with our way of life – well, because ‘it’s ethical.’

And so it is.

That’s why we need something more solid to steady the arc of liberty than ethics; something that can stand the test of time against the unremitting onslaughts of crisis, propaganda, social change, and wars; something that will not give in, nor give up; something that feels no necessity to succumb and adapt and support the loudest voice, the strongest arm, or the golden calf opportunity.

George Washington knew what it was, and so do you.

Providence has connected the permanent felicity of a nation with its virtue. (2)

Virtue, that is, to Higher Laws. Thus, “Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports.” (3)

He knew it. He saw and felt God’s miraculous hand aiding the colonists throughout the revolution and guiding her in the establishment of the best constitution the world had ever known.

In his First Inaugural Address, he noted:

No people can be bound to acknowledge and adore the Invisible Hand which conducts the affairs of men more than those of the United States. Every step by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency; and in the important revolution just accomplished in the system of their united government the tranquil deliberations and voluntary consent of so many distinct communities from which the event has resulted can not be compared with the means by which most governments have been established without some return of pious gratitude, along with an humble anticipation of the future blessings which the past seem to presage. (4)

With that in mind, he understood that

it would be peculiarly improper to omit in this first official act my fervent supplications to that Almighty Being who rules over the universe, who presides in the councils of nations, and whose providential aids can supply every human defect, that His benediction may consecrate to the liberties and happiness of the people of the United States … and may enable every instrument employed in its administration to execute with success the functions allotted to his charge. (5)

He was turning over the watch care of the nation to the Being whose right it is to preside, who was “the Great Author of every public and private good.” (6)

And why did he say this?

These reflections, arising out of the present crisis, have forced themselves too strongly on my mind to be suppressed. (7)

He believed it. He believed it with every fiber of his being. And why should you or I or any haughty and wicked instructor or government official or supposed patriotic legal organization take it upon themselves to suppress the truth about America from the very mouths of the men who founded this nation?

“In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness — these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens”, (8) concluded Washington in his Farewell Address.

That is the truth about the issue. No greater enemy of the state is there than those who labor to hide from man a view of whence cometh freedom, or who likewise labor to subvert the moral codes and Higher Laws that the very Author of our Liberty has laid down to keep us free.

Until we come to grips with this, and do and say more then we do and say presently – as is our right and duty, regardless of personal cost – one wonders how much we deserve to be called “citizen,” “child of God,” “honest, and moral man.”


Get your copy of Steve Farrell’s inspirational novel, Dark Rose.


Steve Farrell is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of The Moral Liberal, one of the original pundits with NewsMax.com (1999-2007), and the author of the inspirational novel Dark Rose. Steve also served as Press Agent for Defend Marriage, Managing Editor of Right Magazine, and is currently also serving as the Editor-In-Chief of the Center for Applied Philosophy’s, “Radical Academy,” a restoration project of The Moral Liberal. Steve’s projects at the Moral Liberal include Liberty Letters, Called Unto Liberty, They Were Believers, Founders Corner Library, the Americanist.

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319 – Nov. 15 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Baptists in Brazil persecuted but prevail

 

1889 – The Republic of Brazil was proclaimed and they adopted a constitution patterned after that of the U.S., and freedom of religion was included. However, in 1930 the nation fell under a dictatorship that lasted through the Second World War. Following the war, political pressures both in Brazil and around the world forced the leaders to adopt a democratic form of government, and a national election was held on Dec. 2, 1945. Several attempts to establish Protestantism had been made as early as the days of John Calvin. Under great pressure these were expelled in 1567. In time gospel preachers came with the Dutch colonists, and in 1810 German Lutherans were permitted to propagate their faith. There was an effort to reestablish the Roman Catholic Church as the state religion in 1925, but public opinion opposed such a move. In 1850 the Southern Baptists transferred Rev. T.J. Bowen from Yoruba, Africa to Brazil but their health demanded retirement from missionary service. Finally on Oct. 12, 1871, the Foreign Mission Board of Richmond sent missionaries to assist and on Jan. 13, 1881, Rev. and Mrs. W.B. Bagby sailed from Baltimore, and forty-eight days later anchored in the Bay of Rio as the first Baptist missionaries to that field. On March 4, 1882, Rev. and Mrs. Z.C. Taylor, the second couple, were sent. They experienced great blessings one of which was to meet a converted priest. Persecution came mainly from the Catholic Church. There were many arrests, throwing of stones, two criminal mobs shooting at each other while the preachers escaped, and many other escapades but the work still grew. [A.R Crabtree, Baptists in Brazil (Rio de Janeiro: Baptist Publishing House, 1953), pp. 79-80. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 624-26.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

The post 319 – Nov. 15 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

 

 

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