Tag Archives: faithful unto death

293 – Oct 20 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

God make me faithful unto death.”

October 20, 1769 – William Ward was born. Just before sailing for India, the Lord caused William Carey’s path to cross that of young William Ward. It was the spring of 1793, and Ward was just 23 years old and was a printer of Derby, who was visiting city friends.

Carey unfolded to him the desire and purpose of his heart respecting Biblical translations. Laying his hand on Ward’s shoulder as they parted, he said, ‘I hope, by God’s blessing to have the Bible translated and ready for the press in four or five years…You must come and print it for us.’ Neither ever forgot this.

It was not until August of 1796 that William Ward was converted and, upon his baptism, united with the Baptist church in Hull. However, soon after that, a Christian friend, recognizing his gifts, offered to pay his expenses to study for the ministry. Thus Ward left the field of journalism and studied under Dr. John Fawcett at Ewood Hall,Yorkshire. Hearing again of the need of the Missionary Society for a printer to publish the Bengalee translation, he offered himself and was accepted.

On May 29, 1799, at the age of 29 Ward sailed with Dr. Marshman, Mr. Brunsdom, and Mr. Grant, with their families, for Bengal. He wrote as follows to Wm. Carey “…I know not whether you will remember a young man, a printer, walking with you from Rippon’s Chapel one Sunday, etc…It is in my heart to live and die with you. May…God make me faithful unto death.” The three have been designated the “Serampore triumvirate.” Carey, Ward, and Joshua Marshman. Ward died in 1823 at 54, Carey in 1834 at 73, and Marshman at 69 in 1837. The cord is joined now once again.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 435-36.

 

The post 293 – Oct 20 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

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43 – Feb. 12 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


“Be faithful unto death!”  
 
On this day, and just six days short or her twenty-fourth birthday, Luba Skvortsova was arrested when the Russian police raided the home where the celebration was taking place.  When the day of her trial finally came about she could see her parents and a multitude of her friends at the court building.  However the vehicle that was carrying her took her back to the jail where she was held and brought her back the next day when no one was there but Russian police.  Her  parents were allowed to come inside for the two day trial which was a farce, and other believers were given the opportunity to hear the sentencing, where she was given a three year prison term.  They began throwing flowers to her and shouted, “take courage”.  She was taken to the prison camp in Voroshilovgrad in Southeastern Ukraine and given a bunk on the top floor with six other women where she collapsed, not having slept in twenty-four hours.  She discovered that she was in the same prison that housed a number of Independent Baptist pastors; Pavel Rytikov, Stepan Germaniuk, Pavel Sazhnev, Ivan Tyagun and Anatoly Balatsky.  When they learned that she was  there, she found a note in the exercise yard, “Be faithful unto death!”  Those were the same words that her friends had shouted to her in the court room at her sentencing.  It was her blessing to meet a Christian friend there, Maria by name who became like a mother to her.  The guards confiscated there short gospel portion and poem book on one occasion and their punishment was denying extra money to spend in the camp store.  After Maria’s release, a pastor’s wife, Ulyana Germaniuk came and Luba was able to minister to her.  Luba was truly faithful for the three years that she has to stay in that terrible place.

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