Tag Archives: dross

DROSS ON THE CROWN JEWELS OF ENGLAND


HEBREW HONEYCOMB

William Andrew Dillard
DROSS ON THE CROWN JEWELS OF ENGLAND

The crown jewels of England are sometimes referenced as the wealth of stability to royalty, and in some measure, to the country itself. I suppose it may be compared to Fort Knox in the U.S. Most have seen pictures of the vast supply of gold bars in the vaults of Ft. Knox, but have never been there to see it in reality. Although the currency of the U.S. is no longer backed by gold, its presence remains a stabilizing factor in the economy.
However, the crown jewels of England, while stored in the Tower of London under heavy guard and extremely thick walls, are treated differently. They are the possession of the state and are loaned to royalty for special events. As a matter of fact, pieces are often carried out for special purposes quite regularly.
It was the privilege of my wife and me to view a large display of those jewels. The occasion did not produce wonder or lust, rather an amazement, and some disappointment. Not being all that familiar with the precious metals and gems, their value could only be appreciated in words of the guide. The five to eight-pound crowns seemed extravagant nonsense, and so highly impractical. That certain crowns had been worn by ancient monarchs put some people in awe; to the rest of us it was “so?” A virtual mountain of silver and gold would not have excited me too much. However, one thing was apparent: the pure content of silver and gold by an occasional film of dross. It was a reminder that, after all, those things are mere elements of this world, and they will pass away.
On the other hand, there is silver and gold that will not pass away. It is the silver and gold of a righteous life. Paul spoke to the church of the Living God at Corinth about this treasure of life in I Corinthians 3:16-19. It is the silver, gold, and precious stones that will survive the judgment fires of God in the day that all of us face: the Judgment Seat of Christ. In that day everything unrighteous will be the victim of Holy Fire as will all else, but what survives the fire is not wood, hay, stubble (unrighteous deeds) but gold, silver and precious stones (righteous acts of life).
In that judgment fire, another great benefit is realized. The gold, silver, and precious stones have all the dross removed: not for a little while to then recollect it, but forever. What a day that will be!
God made a promise to His people through the prophet Isaiah says, “And I will turn my hand upon thee, and purely purge away thy dross, and take away thy tin:” While He spoke of things He would create on the condition of their repentance, He has made much greater and brighter promises to us concerning the day when He will take all our dross away! Even so, come, Lord Jesus!

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155 — June 04 This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Would the Nightingale care if the toad despised her singing?”

 

It all began in a meetinghouse yard June 4, 1768, when the sheriff of Spotsylvania County, Virginia seized John Waller, Lewis Craig, James Childs, James Reed and William Mash. Three magistrates were standing in that yard and bound them under penalty of one thousand pounds apiece to appear in court two days later. The prosecutor charged them with being disturbers of the peace, alleging, “They cannot meet a man upon the road, but they must ram a text of Scripture down his throat.”

 

As they passed through the streets of Fredericksburg toward the old stone gaol, locked arm in arm, they sang the old hymn:

 

Broad is the road that leads to death,

 

And thousands walk together there;

 

But wisdom shows a narrow path,

 

With here and there a traveler.

 

Deny thyself and take thy cross,

 

Is the Redeemer’s great command;

 

Nature must count her gold but dross

 

If she would gain this heavenly land.

 

These men could sing, like the apostles in the jail at Philippi, under the most trying circumstances, because there was joy in their souls. If there were those who ridiculed them as they went through the streets singing that resounding song, what did they care?  What would the nightingale care if the toad despised her singing? She would sing on and leave the cold toad to his grouchy thoughts and shadows. And what cared these preachers for the sneers and scoffs of men who grovel upon the earth? They sang on in the ear and the bosom of God.

 

They were kept in prison in Fredericksburg forty three days for quoting the Word of God.

 

Other counties continued for some time imprisoning Baptist preachers, Spotsylvania never dared to repeat the experiment.

 

 

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I. ( Thompson/Cummins)pp. 230 -231.

 

 

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