Tag Archives: Dr. John Rippon

122 – May 01 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


America’s victory over England secured England’s liberty too
1748 – Dr. John Rippon of England,in a  letter addressed to Dr. James Manning, president of Brown University, said: “I believe all of our Baptist ministers in town, except two, and most of our brethren in the country were on the side of the Americans in the late dispute….We wept when the thirsty plains drank the blood of our departed heroes, and the shout of a king was among us when your well bought battles were crowned with victory; and to this hour we believe that the independence of America will, for a while, secure the liberty of this country, but if that continent had been reduced, Britain would not have long been free.” Dr. Rippon was one of the most influential Baptist ministers in England during the 19th century. At the age of 17, Rippon attended Bristol Baptist College in Bristol, England. After the death of John Gill, he assumed Gill’s pastorate, the Baptist meeting-house in Carter Lane, Tooley Street, which moved in 1833 to the New Park Street Chapel in London, from 1773 at the age of 20 until his death, a period of 63 years. Rippon’s church was later pastored byCharles Haddon Spurgeon before moving to the Metropolitan Tabernacle at Elephant and Castle inSouthwark.
Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: John T. Christian, A History of The Baptists (1922; reprinted., Nashville:  Broadman Press, 1926), 2:228
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317 – Nov. 13 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

On Christ the solid Rock I Stand…”

 

1874 – Pastor Edward Mote peacefully slipped into the arms of Jesus, his body was borne by weeping saints to whom he had ministered, and he was buried in the little graveyard in the back of Rehoboth Chapel, Horsham, Sussex England. In June of 1873 he had become so weakened that he could no longer minister to his church, where his ministry had been used of God to bring many to Christ. Mote was one of the great hymnists that is numbered with those who have written some of the half million or more hymns that have remained from days gone by that are still in the hymnals of today. Singing has ever been a part of Christian worship. At the last supper it says, “And when they had sung an hymn, they went out…” In a letter written to the Roman Emperor Trajan by Pliny the Younger, Governor of Bithynia about A.D. 100, he said the following about a Christian worship service. “They are accustomed to meet on a fixed day before daylight to sing a hymn of praise to Christ as God.” Mote was born in London on Jan. 21, 1797 to parents who ran a “public house”, and growing up in that influence strayed. He was apprenticed to a cabinet maker and began attending religious services, and through the ministry of John Hyatt received Christ as Savior. Later he was baptized by Rev. John Bayley on Nov. 1, 1815, moved to Southwark, and was under the ministry of the famed Dr. John Rippon. It was there that he penned the words to that great hymn “On Christ the solid Rock I Stand, All other ground is sinking sand. My hope is built on nothing less Than Jesus’ blood and righteousness; All other ground is sinking sand.” [Henry S. Burrage, Baptist Hymn Writers and Their Hymns (Portland, Maine: Brown, Thurston and Company, 1888), pp. 155-59. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 620-22]   Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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