Tag Archives: Daniel Webster

The Mayflower set sail September 16, 1620


The Mayflower set sail September 16, 1620

Pilgrims departing on Mayflower at Leyden

American Minute with Bill Federer

SEPTEMBER 16, 1620, according to the Gregorian Calendar, 102 passengers set sail on the Pilgrims’ ship, Mayflower.

Their 66-day journey of 2,750 miles encountered storms so rough the beam supporting the main mast cracked and was propped back in place with “a great iron screw.”

One youth, John Howland, was swept overboard by a freezing wave and rescued. His descendants include Ralph Waldo Emerson, Humphrey Bogart, Franklin D. Roosevelt and George W. Bush.

During the Pilgrims’ voyage, a man died and a mother gave birth.

Intending to land in Virginia, they were blown off-course.

Of their landing in Massachusetts, Governor William Bradford wrote:

“Being thus arrived in a good harbor, and brought safe to land, they fell upon their knees and blessed the God of Heaven who had brought them over the vast and furious ocean, and delivered them from all the perils and miseries thereof, again to set their feet on the firm and stable earth, their proper element.”

Though half died that first bitter winter, Governor William Bradford wrote:

“Last and not least, they cherished a great hope and inward zeal of laying good foundations…for the propagation and advance of the gospel of the kingdom of Christ in the remote parts of the world.”

At the Bicentennial Celebration of the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock, Secretary of State Daniel Webster stated December 22, 1820:

“There is a…sort of genius of the place, which…awes us. We feel that we are on the spot where the first scene of our history was laid; where the hearths and altars of New England were first placed; where Christianity, and civilization…made their first lodgement, in a vast extent of country…

‘If God prosper us,’ might have been the… language of our fathers, when they landed upon this Rock, ‘…we shall here begin a work which shall last for ages… We shall fill this region of the great continent…with civilization and Christianity…”

Daniel Webster continued:

“The morning that beamed…saw the Pilgrims already at home…a government and a country were to commence, with the very first foundations laid under the divine light of the Christian religion…

Our ancestors established their system of government on morality and religious sentiment…Whatever makes men good Christians, makes them good citizens.

Our fathers came here to enjoy their religion free and unmolested; and, at the end of two centuries, there is nothing upon which we can pronounce more confidently…than of the inestimable importance of that religion to man…”

Daniel Webster warned:

“We are bound…to convince the world that order and law, religion and morality, the rights of conscience, the rights of persons, and the rights of property, may all be preserved and secured, in the most perfect manner, by a government entirely and purely elective.

If we fail in this, our disaster will be signal, and will furnish an argument…in support of those opinions which maintain that government can rest safely on nothing but power and coercion…”

Continuing his 1820 speech, Daniel Webster added a rebuke:

“The African slave-trader is a pirate and a felon; and in the sight of Heaven, an offender far beyond the ordinary depth of human guilt…

If there be…any participation in this traffic, let us pledge ourselves here, upon the rock of Plymouth, to extirpate and destroy it…

I invoke the ministers of our religion, that they proclaim its denunciation of these crimes, and add its solemn sanctions to the authority of human laws.

If the pulpit be silent whenever or wherever there may be a sinner bloody with this guilt within the hearing of its voice, the pulpit is false to its trust…”

Daniel Webster reflected further:

“Whoever shall hereafter write this part of our history…will be able to record no…lawless and despotic acts, or any successful usurpation.

His page will contain no exhibition of…civil authority habitually trampled down by military power, or of a community crushed by the burden of taxation…

He will speak…of that happy condition, in which the restraint and coercion of government are almost invisible and imperceptible…”

Daniel Webster stated further:

“Finally, let us not forget the religious character of our origin.

Our fathers were brought hither by their high veneration for the Christian religion.

They journeyed by its light, and labored in its hope.

They sought to incorporate its principles with the elements of their society, and to diffuse its influence through all their institutions, civil, political, or literary.

Let us cherish these sentiments, and extend this influence still more widely; in the full conviction, that that is the happiest society which partakes in the highest degree of the mild and peaceful spirit of Christianity…”

Daniel Webster concluded:

“Advance, then, ye future generations!

We would hail you, as you rise in your long succession, to fill the places which we now fill…

We welcome you to the blessings of good government and religious
liberty…

We welcome you to…the happiness of kindred, and parents, and children.

We welcome you to the immeasurable blessings of rational existence, the immortal hope of Christianity, and the light of everlasting truth!”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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Lewis Cass, born October 9, 1782


Lewis CassAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

The Democrat Party’s candidate for President in the 1848 election was Lewis Cass, born OCTOBER 9, 1782.

In 1807, Lewis Cass became the US Marshal for Ohio.

He was a Brigadier-General in the War of 1812, fighting in the Battle of the Thames.

President James Madison appointed him Governor-General of the Michigan Territory, 1813-1831, where he made Indian treaties, organized townships and built roads.

In 1820, he led an expedition to northern Minnesota to search for the source of the Mississippi River in order to define the border between the U.S. and Canada.

Cass’ expedition geologist Henry Schoolcraft identified the Mississippi’s source as Lake Itasca in 1832.

President Andrew Jackson appointed Lewis Cass as Secretary of War in 1831, then minister to France in 1836.

He was elected a U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1845-48, 1849-57.

Senator Lewis Cass wrote from Washington, D.C. in 1846:

“God, in His providence, has given us a Book of His revealed will to be with us at the commencement of our career in this life and at its termination;

and to accompany us during all chances and changes of this trying and fitful progress, to control the passions, to enlighten the judgment, to guide the conscience, to teach us what we ought to do here, and what we shall be hereafter.”

Lewis Cass delivered a Eulogy for Secretary of State Daniel Webster, December 14, 1852:

“‘How are the mighty fallen!’ we may yet exclaim, when reft of our great and wisest; but they fall to rise again from death
to life, when such quickening faith in the mercy of God and in the sacrifice of the Redeemer comes to shed upon them its happy influence this side of the grave and beyond it…”

Continuing his Eulogy of Daniel Webster, Lewis Cass stated”

“And beyond all this he died in the faith of the Christian – humble, but hopeful – adding another to the long list of eminent men who have searched the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and have found it to be the word and the will of God.”

Lewis Cass was Secretary of State for President James Buchanan, 1857-1860.

The State of Michigan placed his statue in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall.

In 17 States, Lewis Cass has places named for him, including: 30 townships, 10 cities, 10 streets, 9 counties, 4 schools, 3 parks, 2 lakes, 1 river, 1 fort, and 1 building.

Lewis Cass stated:

“Independent of its connection with human destiny hereafter, the fate of republican government is indissolubly bound up with the fate of the Christian religion,

and a people who reject its holy faith will find themselves the slaves of their own evil passions and of arbitrary power.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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Henry Clay – a brief biography


 

Henry Clay (1777-1852)

 

American Minute with Bill Federer

 

“I would rather be right than President,” answered Henry Clay, when told his abolitionist position would cost him the election.

 

Clay was 3 times a candidate for President, once only 5,000 votes short.

 

The son of a Baptist minister, Henry Clay studied law under George Wythe, served in Congress over 40 years and was Speaker of the House 6 times.

 

Henry Clay stated in 1841:

 

“Patriotism, which, catching its inspiration from the immortal God…prompts to deeds of self-sacrifice, of valor, of devotion, and of death itself – that is public virtue, that is the noblest, the sublimest of all public virtues.”

 

Clay was part of the “Great Triumvirate,” with Daniel Webster and John Calhoun which led Congress during the early 1800′s.

 

He helped negotiate the treaty ending the War of 1812 and was key to John Quincy Adams being the 6th President instead of Andrew Jackson.

 

In 1824, Clay supported Greeks who wanted freedom from the Muslim Ottoman Empire, and he supported South Americans wanting freedom from Spain.

 

Abraham Lincoln described Henry Clay in a eulogy, July 6, 1852:

 

“When Greece rose against the Turks and struck for liberty, his name was mingled with the battle-cry of freedom.

 

When South America threw off the thraldom of Spain, his speeches were read at the head of her armies by Bolivar.

 

His name…will continue to be hallowed in two hemisphere… Clay was without an equal…He exorcised the demon which possessed the body politic…

 

Clay’s efforts in behalf of the South Americans, and…in behalf of the Greeks, in the times of their respective struggles for civil liberty are among the finest on record.”

 

In 1832, when an Asiatic Cholera epidemic ravaged New York, Henry Clay recommended a Day of: “Public humiliation, prayer and fasting to be observed by the people of the United States with religious solemnity.”

 

Henry Clay was second cousin’s of abolitionist Cassius Marcellus Clay, and in 1816, helped establish the American Colonization Society to aid free American blacks in founding Monrovia, Liberia, West Africa.

 

Clay addressed the Kentucky Colonization Society in Frankfort, 1829:

 

“Eighteen hundred years have rolled away since the Son of God, our blessed Redeemer, offered Himself on Mount Calvary for the salvation of our species…

 

When we shall, as soon we must, be translated from this into another form of existence, is the hope presumptuous that we shall behold the common Father of the whites and blacks, the great Ruler of the Universe, cast his all-seeing eye upon civilized and regenerated Africa, its cultivated fields, its coasts studded with numerous cities, adorned with towering temples dedicated to the pure religion of His Redeeming Son?”

 

Known as “The Great Compromiser,” Clay opposed the Mexican-American War, and struggled to maintain the Union between the North and the South by proposing “The Compromise of 1850.”

 

Henry Clay told the Senate, February 5, 1850:

 

“I hope it will not be out of place to do here, what again and again I have done in my private chamber, to implore of Him who holds the destinies of nations and individuals in His hands, to bestow upon our country His blessing, to calm the violence and rage of party, to still passion…

 

May I not ask of Him too, sir, to bestow on his humble servant…the blessing of his smiles, and of strength and ability to perform the work which now lies before him?…

 

I implore…Heaven…that if…the dissolution of this Union is to happen, I shall not survive to behold the sad and heart-rending spectacle.”

 

Nine year before the Civil War began, Henry Clay died from tuberculosis, JUNE 29, 1852.

 

The first to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda, a statue of Henry Clay was placed in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall by the State of Kentucky.

 

Fifteen counties across America were named for him.

 

In 1957, a Senate Committee headed by John F. Kennedy named Clay one of the 5 best Senators ever.

 

Rep. John C. Breckinridge recalled Henry Clay as having said:

 

“The vanity of the world, and its insufficiency to satisfy the soul of man, has been long a settled conviction of my mind.

 

Man’s inability to secure by his own merits the approbation of God, I feel to be true…

 

I trust in the atonement of the Saviour of mercy, as the ground of my acceptance and of my hope of salvation.”

 

Henry Clay warned the Senate, July 22, 1850:

 

“If there be a war…I will not assert what party would prevail…for you know, sir, what all history teaches…that few wars…have ever terminated in the accomplishment of the objects for which they were commenced…

 

Think alone of our God, our country, our consciences, and our glorious Union…without which we shall be torn into hostile fragments, and sooner or later become the victims of military despotism, or foreign domination…”

 

Clay continued:

 

“What will be the judgment of mankind…who are looking upon the progress of this scheme of self-government as being that which holds out the highest hopes…of ameliorating the condition of mankind…

 

Will not all the monarchs of the old world pronounce our glorious republic a disgraceful failure?…

 

It is possible that, for the chastisement of our sins and transgressions, the rod of Providence may be still applied to us, may be still suspended over us…

 

I pray to Almighty God that it may not lead to the most unhappy and disastrous consequences to our beloved country”

 

Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

 

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