Tag Archives: Columbian College

361 – Dec. 27 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


(In) five years 502 people were added to the church
December 27, 1869 – Dr. Baron Stow ended his sojourn here on this earth and took his place as one of the most outstanding Baptist preachers of any generation. Stow was born a country boy on his father’s farm in New England in 1801. It was apparent that Baron, like Samuel was listening to the voice of God as a young child. Near his home there was a boulder that he used as a pulpit to preach the gospel to his boyhood friends. After preparation for college in Newport, New Hampshire, Stow entered Columbian College in Washington, D.C., in 1822. He sat under outstanding professors, and as a good student he finished the course in three years. Following a time as Editor of the Triennial Convention’s periodical Columbian Star, he became pastor of the Baptist church in Portsmouth, N.H. Soon the growth was such that they had to build a new house of worship. After five years he answered the call to pastor the Baldwin Place Baptist Church in Boston where his ministry was even more fruitful. At the close of 1837 he preached a remarkable sermon from Prov. 27:1 – Boast not thyself of tomorrow; for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth. More than one hundred people were awakened to conversion. The year 1838 opened with a powerful revival, and during the next five years, 502 people were added to the church on profession of their faith in Jesus Christ. Stow was also most concerned for the cause of missions world-wide. He preached and wrote concerning world evangelism to stir up fellow believers to respond to the mandate of their Lord. Toward the end of forty years of ministry illness forced him from the pulpit several times before he finally had to hang up the Sword of the Spirit for the final time.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 542-43.

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350 – Dec. 16 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Revival came and spread in the land.
 December 16, 1769 – Jesse Mercer – Was born in Halifax County, North Carolina. According to William Cathcart, in his time, “He was the most influential Baptist minister in the State of Georgia.” He was the oldest child of the Rev. Silas Mercer, and his young life was circumspect in every regard, but at the age of 15, he saw himself as a sinner and was converted. In his 17th year he was baptized and united with the Phillips’ Mill Church. In his 19th year he was married, and before he was 20, he was ordained into the ministry and began his fruitful work for the Lord.
For over 50 years he served the Lord as pastor, but he traveled extensively preaching the gospel to the spiritually impoverished in sparsely settled areas of the state. He was influenced by Luther Rice and became a strong advocate of missions among the slaves, promoted the Sunday school movement, and led in the efforts of the temperance movement. He served as a trustee of the Columbian College in Washington, D.C.  He served as clerk of the Georgia Baptist Association for 21 years, and as moderator for 23 years. He was President of the Georgia Baptist Convention for 19 years, from its founding in 1822 until 1841. He also published The Christian Index. His wife died on the way home where he preached at the Triennial Convention in 1826 and the following year he married Nancy Simons, a wealthy widow, and together they became generous donors to the cause of Christ. Though he was granted a doctorate from Brown University in 1835 he preferred not to be called by that title but they called him “Brother” and his friends called him “Father.” On returning from a revival where there was a great outpouring he stood before his people and said with tears, “You are too good to be saved!” Revival came and spread in the land.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 524-26.

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