Tag Archives: Bristol Baptist College

184 – July 02 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

Andrew_Gifford

 

“A goodly heritage”

 

Andrew Gifford entered into heaven on June 19, 1784 and was buried in front of 200 ministers and a multitude of others in Bunhill Fields in the early morning of July 2, 1784. Dr. John Ryland, President of Bristol Baptist College, stood on a tombstone and delivered the funeral oration. Gifford had just completed over 60 years in the Baptist ministry in Bristol during a time of religious tolerance under the “Declaration of Indulgence” granted by King Charles II on Sept. 5, 1672. Prior to that, Andrews grandfather, his namesake, was imprisoned at least four times for preaching without state authority. His father, Rev. Emmanuel Gifford, served as a sentry as his father preached the gospel in the Bristol area. Once he was discovered and violently pursued by their persecutors. He took refuge under a staircase as his tormentors ran on by, swearing to do him physical harm if they caught him, but God gave deliverance to the young man and the Baptists in their worship. With such a heritage, young Andrew was raised in Bristol and was baptized when he was fifteen years old. He was trained at the local academy and was preaching the gospel by the time he was twenty-four. Dr. Ryland, said the following words at his grave side that morning, “Farewell, thou dear old man! We leave thee in the possession of Death until the Resurrection Day, but we will bear witness against thee, O King of terrors, at the mouth of this dungeon-thou shalt not always have possession of this dead body it shall be demanded of thee by the great Conqueror, and at that moment thou shalt resign thy prisoner. O ye ministers of Christ, ye people of God, ye surrounding spectators, prepare to meet this old servant of Christ at that day, that hour when this whole place shall be nothing but life, and death shall be swallowed up in victory.”

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 270-272.

 

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55 – February – 24 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

George Grenfells

 

He knew not retreat

 

1876 – George Grenfell, Congo’s Pioneer and Explorer, having just married, sailed with his new bride for Africa.  Within a year she succumbed to dysentery, and sometime later George remarried his second wife Rose, who was able to travel with him on many of his most thrilling journeys.  George had been reared in a very religious Anglican home in England but was influenced by a Baptist Sunday school at the Heneage Street Baptist Church at Birmingham.  It was during this time that he read Livingstone’s Travels and dedicated himself for service in Africa.   He then entered Bristol Baptist College in 1873, but learning that his missionary hero, Alfred Saker was in England, after connecting through correspondence, accompanied him to the Cameroons, beginning his work in Africa at twenty-five years of age.  In August 1877, Henry M. Stanley, having been sent to find Livingstone, appeared at the mouth of the Congo, and the world was electrified in that it had taken him three years to go from the east to the west coast.  Even though the Cameroons were six hundred miles north of the Congo River, Grenfel was immediately burdened to plant the message of the cross through this great waterway.  In God’s providence, a wealthy man in England provided a ship to penetrate Central Africa with the gospel that was made available for Grenfell’s use.  With untold sacrifices and privations he gave himself to the work.  He buried his children in Africa and grieved continually over the deaths of his fellow missionaries.  But he wrote, “God’s finger points ONWARD! FORWARD! What caused him the most pain was the indifference of the home churches to sending missionaries.  When his mission agency considered receding, he wrote, “It is either advance or retreat; but if it is retreat, you must not count on me, I will not be a party to it, and you will have to go on without me.”  Grenfell died on July 1, 1906.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 76.

 

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342 – Dec. 08 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Saw the sham of French Revolution

 

1760 – Morgan John Rhees, was born in Glamonshire, Wales. He was provided the best educational opportunities of his time, and then at age twenty-two entered the Bristol Baptist College – England and studied under the famed Caleb Evans. During those days he became an advocate for political freedom and especially became enamored with the French Revolution. After graduation he returned to his homeland and became pastor of the Baptist church in Monmouth. Though he was being used in evangelism his interest in the political scene led him to France in an itinerant ministry. He soon saw through the sham of the political leaders in France and returned to Wales. However, to escape being prosecuted on pretext of being friendly with the French, he sailed for America in Feb. 1794, and was well received by Dr. William Rogers, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia, and provost of the U of Philadelphia. He preached extensively through the South and West with great success, and was compared to Whitfield. He then married the daughter of Col. Benjamin Loxley, an officer of the Revolutionary War. In time, Rhees united with Dr. Benjamin Rush, one of the signers of the Dec. of Independence in purchasing a large tract of land in Pennsylvania, which in honor of Rhee’s homeland was named Cambria. A large group from Wales settled there and Rhees served them as Pastor of the Baptist church in Beulah, Penn. At the age of forty-four he took on a sudden attack of pleurisy that led to his demise on Sept. 17, 1804. Those who were there said that his home going was more of a translation than a death.  [This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 670-72. William B. Sprague, Annals of the American Pulpit (New York: Robert Carter and Brothers, 1865), p. 345.]  Prepared by Dr. Greg Dixon

 

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275 – Oct. 02 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

They “Held the Rope”

 

1792 – Is a day that should live forever in the hearts of Bible believing Baptists, for it was on that day that the first modern-day mission agency was founded. William Carey, Andrew Fuller, and a small group of Baptist pastors from the Northhamptonshire Baptist Association in Great Britain formed the Baptist Missionary Society, or the B.M.S. for short. Dr. John Collett Ryland, Jr. was to become the driving force behind the eventual success of the B.M.S. He was the son of Rev. John C. Ryland, Sr. and was born in 1753 in Warwick and educated in his father’s school. He served for fifteen years as his fathers assistant at the College Lane Church, Northhampton, before succeeding him as pastor of that Baptist congregation in 1786. It was while assistant to his father that he baptized William Carey in the River Nen on Oct. 5, 1783. His diary entry said, “I baptized a poor journeyman cobbler.” In 1792 he became pastor of Broadmead Baptist in Bristol and principal of Bristol Baptist College where many men were trained for the ministry and missions. He followed Fuller as the Secretary of the B.M.S. and traveled extensively and preached nearly 9,000 sermons, much of it for the cause of missions. Twenty-six of his students went on to the mission field. Carey had challenged Ryland, Sutcliff, Fuller, and Pearce to “hold the rope” while he went into the mine of India. They didn’t disappoint him. Dr. Ryland died in 1825 at 72 years of age. [Norman S. Moon, Education for Ministry-Bristol Baptist College 1679-1979 (Rushden, Norrthhamptonshire: Stanley L. Hunt, Ltd. 1979), p. 113. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. 539-40.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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183 – July, 02 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

A goodly heritage”

 

            Andrew Gifford entered into heaven on June 19, 1784 and was buried in front of 200 ministers and a multitude of others in Bunhill Fields in the early morning of July 2, 1784. Dr. John Ryland, President of Bristol Baptist College, stood on a tombstone and delivered the funeral oration. Gifford had just completed over 60 years in the Baptist ministry in Bristol during a time of religious tolerance under the “Declaration of Indulgence” granted by King Charles II on Sept. 5, 1672. Prior to that, Andrews grandfather, his namesake, was imprisoned at least four times for preaching without state authority. His father, Rev. Emmanuel Gifford, served as a sentry as his father preached the gospel in the Bristol area. Once he was discovered and violently pursued by their persecutors. He took refuge under a staircase as his tormentors ran on by, swearing to do him physical harm if they caught him, but God gave deliverance to the young man and the Baptists in their worship. With such a heritage, young Andrew was raised in Bristol and was baptized when he was fifteen years old. He was trained at the local academy and was preaching the gospel by the time he was twenty-four. Dr. Ryland, said the following words at his grave side that morning, “Farewell, thou dear old man! We leave thee in the possession of Death until the Resurrection Day, but we will bear witness against thee, O King of terrors, at the mouth of this dungeon-thou shalt not always have possession of this dead body it shall be demanded of thee by the great Conqueror, and at that moment thou shalt resign thy prisoner. O ye ministers of Christ, ye people of God, ye surrounding spectators, prepare to meet this old servant of Christ at that day, that hour when this whole place shall be nothing but life, and death shall be swallowed up in victory.”

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: adapted From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 270-272.

 

 

 

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04 – Jan. 04 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


His brilliance was revealed early
 William Staughton was born in Coventry, England, on Jan. 4, 1770.  His brilliance was revealed early when at the age of twelve he published poems in Goldsmith’s Animated Nature. He was saved early in life, and baptized by Rev. Samuel Pearce of Birmingham. In 1792 he graduated from Bristol Baptist College, and while a student attended the organizational meeting of the first modern-day missionary agency in the world.  Though still a youth, he sat in the company of men like William Carey and Andrew fuller.  He pastored briefly in Northampton, and then sailed to America in 1793.  Richard Furman requested that he serve as pastor of the Baptist church in Georgetown, S.C., where he remained briefly.  Ordained on June 17, 1797, he served two churches in New Jersey.  He assisted in founding a seminary and continued his studies.  From 1805 to 1823, he served as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia and later the Sanson St. Baptist Church of that city.  During that period he also served as the principle of a Baptist Theological institution.  He also served as corresponding secretary of the American Baptist Board of foreign Missions.  In 1823 he was appointed the first President as first president of Columbian College in Washington in Washington, D.C.  He sent his library ahead in anticipation of the move but he never made it.  He became ill and passed into the presence of the Lord on Dec. 12, 1829.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins /, pp. 7-8.

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