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272 – Sept. 29, 1512 – This Day in Baptist History Past


The Donatists Repudiated this Falsity

Balthasar Hubmaier received the doctorate of theology from the University of Ingolstadt in Germany and entered the Roman Catholic ministry. Through his studies he became disillusioned with what he had been taught and by 1523 was in contact with the Protestant reformer, Zwingli and he was transformed by the grace of God. His outspoken ways brought great persecution down upon him. He like Peter, under pressure, denied the truth, but repented and was able to give a glorious testimony to God’s grace in the flames of martyrdom on March 10, 1528. Three days later his wife Elizabeth, undaunted in her faith, was thrown into the Danube River and drowned. The doctrine that caused our Anabaptist forebears to suffer at the hands of Catholic and Protestant Reformers alike was infant baptism. That wicked heresy was established in the third century as Cyprian consulted with sixty bishops upon the question of whether children were to be baptized on the third or eighth day from their birth? Our forefathers the Donatists, repudiated this falsity. The Reformers, Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin continued in this heresy, and also persecuted the Baptists, and other non-conformists over this issue, which they had received from Augustine. [Wm. R. Estep, The Anabaptist Story Nashville: Broadman Press, 1963), p. 49. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 533-34.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

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265 – Sept. 22 – This Day in Baptist History Past


They planted small groups for Bible study

1850 – Elder Devin, the Pastor of the Grassy Creek Baptist Church of Granville County, N.C. baptized fifty ‘happy’ converts in that noble stream, by the same name, that flows by the church. The church historian claimed that the pastor had, perhaps, plunged a thousand in the creek in the same manner. Grassy Creek church had spawned many other churches and itself had existed in its purity for more than a century since its inception by Shubael Stearns and Daniel Marshall in 1757 shortly after they arrived from New England. Grassy Creek planted small groups for Bible study throughout a forty-mile area that ultimately grew into churches. They also believed in “protracted” or lengthy meetings. One
such meeting in 1775 garnered eighteen souls by membership through baptism. Large crowds would gather to see these baptismal services which were great testimonies to the grace of God in themselves. Grassy Creek church also maintained a great interest in missions at home and abroad. And the congregation was never lured away by entertainment more than involvement, having “itching ears.” [Robert I. Devin, A History of Grassy Creek Baptist Church (Raleigh, N. C.: Edwards, Broughton & Co., 1880), p, 70. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 519-21]

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264 – Sept. 21 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

A Deist leads Judson from infidelity

1808 – Adoniram Judson secured his horse from the home of his uncle where he had left it, and then started back to his home to regroup after having left to try his luck in the theater in N.Y. City. On the way back he stopped at a village Inn and took a room and all night long a sick man disturbed his sleep.  The next morning when he inquired he was quite disturbed to find out that the man had died and that he was Jacob Eames, an upper classman at Rhode Island College where Judson had gone, and who had been a fellow Deist and unbeliever.  In fact he had been the very one that had led Judson into infidelity and away from his Christian roots.  For hours the words “Dead! Lost! Lost!” kept ringing in his ears. There was only one place for him and that was home, home to his preacher father and godly mother. And so it was that on Dec. 2, 1808, the young man found peace through faith in the blood of Jesus Christ.  This was the man who became the first Baptist missionary to Burma. [Courtney Anderson, To the Golden Shore, (Boston: Little, brown and Company, 1956), p. 30. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 517—19.]  Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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261 – Sept. 18 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Nearly every house a house of prayer

 

1842 – Elder Jabez Smith Swan preached the last Sunday of a five week evangelistic effort that began on August 14 in Mystic, Conn. Those present said that he was truly ‘in the Spirit on the Lord’s day’, as he preached with great power. After the first baptism, there were daily baptisms in Mystic for twenty-six successive days, and sometimes twice daily. More than four hundred persons were baptized during that period. Almost every house was turned into a house of prayer. Swan was born in Stonington, Conn. on Feb. 23, 1800 and at fourteen had “given a good account of himself” as a powder boy in the defense of his town in the War of 1812. He moved to Lyme with his parents, Joshua and Esther and had a deep conversion experience when he was twenty-one years old and was baptized by Rev. William Palmer. He was called to preach, studied at the Hamilton Literary and Theological Institute, and was ordained to the gospel ministry on June 20, 1827. He pastored several churches but always returned to evangelism. He died in 1884 after seeing more than 10,000 conversions, most of them baptized. [F. Dennison, The Evangelist, or Life and Labors of Rev. Jabez S. Swan (Waterford, Conn.,: Wm. L. Peckham, 1873), pp. 193-95, 203-4. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 511-13]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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259 – Sept. 16 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The Baptists Reach Idaho

 

1805 – Lewis and Clark, on their expedition to explore the Louisiana Purchase noted in their journal that their food supply had run out. They and their company were lost in the Indian country of Idaho for a week from Sept. 13-20. This effort opened the territory for new development and Idaho became America’s 43rd state on July 3, 1890. The Baptists have been there since 1830. Around 1894 Rev. Howard Bowler of Bellevue heard that there were a few people in the Big Lost Valley who desired to hear the Word of God, so he hitched up his horse and buggy and rode the ninety miles through the lava desert to reach them. A few women had maintained a Sunday school in a schoolhouse, he met the Nelsons who were believers and rode on to Arco and met another believer and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. George E. Ferris, who owned General Stores in Arco and Houston. The following Sunday, services were held at the dance hall at Lost River, and so many came it closed the dance hall. In a six-week period a church was founded and a Sunday school was started. In that same period Rev. Bowler preached sixty sermons, traveled one-thousand miles on visitation as he witnessed to every family within twenty miles, and cut ice to baptize. [Coe Hayne, Old Trails and New (Philadelphia: Judson Press, 1920), p. 30. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 507-08.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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256 – Sept. 13 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The Faith of the Lepers

 

1876 – Dr. James M. Haswell died after forty-one years of missionary service in Burma, with his dear wife Jane Mason, who he had married on August 23, 1835, and sailed for their chosen field one month later. He was more fruit from the Hamilton Theological Institute in Bennington, Vermont. Dr.Haswell mastered the Burmese language and then turned to the Pegulan dialect to reach the 80,000 of that tribe. He only took two furloughs, one in 1849 and another in 1867 and those were used to spur interest in missions. He was most diligent that his son James should follow him which he did but tragically died of cholera but a year after his father in 1877. But the Haswell vision lived on through their daughter Susan who founded the Maulmein Leper Colony in which she invested sixty years of her life. The government gave the land and the lepers themselves built the thatched roof buildings with, in some cases, stumps for hands and feet. It stood for years as a memorial to her and the faith of the lepers. Untold thousands were saved. [A.H. Burlingham, The Story of Baptist Missions in Foreign Lands (St. Louis: C.R. Barns Publishing Co., 1892), p. 944. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 501-02.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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258 – Sept. 15 – This Day in Baptist History Past


God’s Sovereign Call

1991 – Ken and Debbie Haley’s church, which he had been the pastor, held a commissioning service, to pledge to “hold the ropes” as the two departed for West Africa. Ken had surrendered to go during a Missions conference, in which they had prayed for God to call one of their own members abroad to preach the gospel. Strangely, both he and his wife had been directed to Rom. 15:20 before ever discussing the matter with each other. After being accepted by Baptist World Missions, spending eighteen months on deputation, and a year in language school, the Haley’s arrived in Contonou, Nenin, West Africa on Oct. 19, 1991. In Dec. Rev. Haley came down with malaria which was the first of six ordeals with the disease. The pharmacist where Ken went spoke English and a friendship was struck, even to the point of Michael Segniho visiting at the home on many occasions, until through Ken’s faithful witnessing, Michael received Christ. Later his wife was saved, and together they built a bamboo structure on their property, and began a French-speaking Baptist church, with forty-nine present for the first service. [This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 505-07]                                Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

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257 – Sept. 14 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

This Day in Baptist History Past

 

He Baptized Over 1500 Souls

 

1840 – Rev. Robert T. Daniel went to be with the Lord just months after his wife, Penelope Cain Flowers had finished her earthly sojourn. His last words were, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” He was born on June 10, 1773, in Middlesex County, Virginia, the fifth son of Samuel and Eliza Daniel, the same year of the Boston Tea Party. After the Revolutionary War the family migrated to N.C. and it was there that Daniel met his wife, was saved, baptized, and called to preach. This was through the influence of the Separate Baptist, Elder Isaac Hicks, at Holly Springs, N.C. Though uneducated, Daniel held successful pastorates, in N.C., S.C., and VA, before moving his family to Tennessee, where he preached until he finally settled in Salem, Miss. which he called home until the Lord called him home. On horseback and by foot, he traveled about sixty thousand miles, preached nearly five thousand sermons, and baptized more than fifteen hundred. His biographer wrote, “It has been the lot of but few men to serve his generation more acceptably, or usefully, than Elder R.T. Daniel.” [Geo. W. Purefoy, A History of the Sandy Creek Ass.(N.Y:Sheldon & Co., 1859), pp. 301-2. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 503-04.]  Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

 

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254 – Sept. 11 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Grace is not Hereditary, Depravity is”

 

1783 – Rev. Isaac Case began his ministry in Readfield, Maine, and until his death at age 91 on Nov. 3, 1852 his life was spent in the preaching of the gospel. The Revolutionary War being over, the message of Christ expanded along with towns and settlements, so his work was the planting of many Baptist churches in those areas. He established the First Baptist Church of Thomaston and Readfield. They only counted converts that were actually baptized in those days, and he baptized scores wherever he went. In 1904 Dr. A.R. Crane presented a paper at the Maine Baptist Missionary Convention entitled The Baptist Ministers in Maine (from 1804-1904) and listed Isaac Case as one of the most important. He said that he heard him preach in his old age, and considered him to have as much power with God as any man he had ever heard, but couldn’t understand why his grown son never attended church services. Asking Case’s son that question one day, the son said, “Grace is not hereditary, depravity is”. (Rom. 5:12)
[Henry S. Burrage, History of  the Baptists in Maine (Portland, Maine: Marks Printing House, Printers, 1904,), p. 68. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 497-99.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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253 – Sept. 10 -This Day in Baptist History Past


 

He refused the “Test Oath”

 

1866 – Rev. B.F. Kenny, a respected Baptist minister, of Daviess County in Missouri, was arrested on three indictments found against him by a grand jury for the crime of preaching the gospel without taking the ‘Test Oath’. The State Convention had inserted this oath into the new constitution on Jan. 6, 1865, at the close of the Civil War, making it mandatory for pastors to vow loyalty to the state above Christ and His Word. 400 pastors out of the 450 in the state suffered rather than bowing until the act was repealed by the Supreme Court of the U.S. on Jan. 14, 1867. Several of them were imprisoned. Rev. J.H. Luther, Editor of the Missouri Baptist Journal was arrested, held on $1,000 bond, to answer the charge of preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ without re-ordination from the commissioner of the state church. Another Baptist preacher was dragged from his home at mid-night, pistol whipped and beaten, and warned to leave the county because he refused to sign the ‘test oath’. [R.S. Duncan, A History of the Baptists in Missouri (St. Louis: Scammell & Co. Publishers, 1882), pp. 926-27. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 496-97.]  Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

 

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