Tag Archives: benjamin keach

200 – July 18 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

Keach-Benjamin

The importance of a godly wife

Only eternity can reward the wives of the great preachers of the past such as the godly wife of Benjamin Keach, who at 28 years of age, was called to pastor the Baptist church at Horsleydown London in 1668. This holy lady, who had borne him five children in ten years, died in 1670, and Keach wrote a poem in her memory entitled “A Pillar Set Up.” In this poem he gave her a very great and noble character, commending her for her zeal for the truth, sincerity in religion, uncommon love to the saints, and her content in whatsoever condition of life God was pleased to bring her to. He particularly observes, how great an help, and comfort, she was to him in his suffering for the cause of Christ, visiting, and taking all possible care of him while in prison, instead of tempting him to use any means for delivery out of his troubles, encouraging him to go on, and counting it an honor done them both, in that they were called to suffer for the sake of Christ. He also said that some acknowledged that their conversion to God was thro’ the conversation that they had with her.” Two years after her death, he married a widow of extraordinary piety with whom he lived thirty-two years. Susanna Partridge bore him five daughters, the youngest of whom married Thomas Crosby, a renowned Baptist historian. After the death of Keach, she lived with her daughter and son-in-law, and Crosby wrote of her, “She lived with me…the last twenty years of her life. I must say, that she walked before God in truth, and with a perfect heart, and did that which was good in His sight. She lived in peace, without spot and blameless.” Many godly wives saw their husbands pilloried, imprisoned, and treated roughly, and the encouragement of these women provided the strength that kept them strong.  Keach died July 18, 1704.  Joseph Stennett preached from, “I know whom I have believed.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From this Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 294-95.

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80 – March – 21 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


The first modern Baptist historian
1683 – Thomas Crosby, the first Baptist historian after the Protestant Reformation was born on this day.  The terrible pain and suffering of the 16th century martyrs had just begun to fade from the new generations memories.  The conventicles in England were past and the Baptists and other non-conformist churches were now worshipping in the open without fear.  This was the atmosphere in which Thomas was converted to Christ and baptized into the Goat Street Baptist Church, where the pastor was his brother-in-law Benjamin Stinton, the son-in-law of Benjamin Keach, pastor of Horsleydown Baptist Church, London.  (See entry for March 1).  Stinton had compiled historical materials and planned to write a Baptist history of England, but he died before it was possible.  The papers came into Crosby’s possession and adding still more of his own, he consumed much information on this general subject, but not being a historian he didn’t feel that he was adequate to the task of writing a history.  In that Daniel Neal, a Puritan was writing a History of the Puritans at that time, he agreed to reserve a section for the Baptists,  but when it was finished, it only included a scare five pages of Neal’s third volume.  Crosby, zealous for the Baptist cause decided to write his own history and became one of the greatest of our Baptist historians.  His four volume work, The History of the English Baptists from the Reformation to the Beginning of the Reign of King George I that appeared from 1738 – 1740 is the first attempt at a complete history of the English Baptists.  Truly blessed is anyone who has these volumes in their library.  And what a great reward, no doubt awaits this ready writer whose heart burned to keep alive this history of a great and worthy people for posterity.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, pp. 115.
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60 – March – 01 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

 

 

Congregational singing began

 

1640 — In that we have no leap year in 2014 we are going to use the entry of Feb. 29 on this date because of its importance to our Baptist churches.  This was the day that Benjamin Keach was born into the home of John Keach of Buckinghamsire, England.  By the age of 15 Benjamin became convinced of believers baptism and submitted himself to the ordinance upon his profession of faith in Christ.  By the age of 18, the society of believers that he fellowshipped with saw fit to set him apart for the gospel ministry.  At age twenty-eight he became pastor of the Baptist church in Horsleydown, London.  In the beginning they met in homes because of the persecution but finally built a meeting house which was enlarged several times up to nearly a thousand.  He wrote many treatises and apologies on the issues of his day which found him in court on many occasions.  He not only differed with the state church officials but with some of his Baptist brethren relating to doctrine and practice.  Baptists have always differed on non- cardinal issues.  One such controversy involved congregational singing.  Because of persecution, it had been necessary to avoid singing in worship until around 1680.  The whole issue turned on one point, whether there was precept or example of the converted and unconverted, to join in the singing as a part of divine worship.  Also they believed that those whom God gifted could sing as the heart dictated the melody but not by rhyme or written note.  First they only sang at the Lord’s Supper and then later after the sermon and prayer.  Some of the dissenters would leave the building and stand in the yard.  Later they withdrew and started their own non-singing church, but then started singing around 1793.  Thanks to Benjamin Keach and others we have congregational singing in our churches today.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 83.

 

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281 – Oct. 08 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

First modern to begin public singing

 

1664 – Twenty-four year old Benjamin Keach was held in the assize (county court) at Aylesbury, England having been bound over for ₤100 and two sureities in bonds of ₤50 each. His crime? He printed a small book entitled, ‘The Child’s Instructor: or, A New and Easy Primer.” The Man of God had suffered, “suffered many occasions of imprisonment and once his life was saved by an officer, which had captured the preacher, preventing them trampling him to death. On another occasion he was charged with publishing a seditious ‘primer’, called the ‘Child’s Instructor.’ Keach was imprisoned, fined and pilloried. Chief-Justice Hyde presided. “…breaking through all law and decency, represented him to the Grand jury as a man of the most dangerous principles, attempting to poison the minds of children…; and exhorted them to do their duty when the bill came before them…and exhorted them to do their duty. The next day the judge was quite pleased as the following indictment was read by the clerk.  “Thou art here indicted Benjamin Keach of Winslow, for seditious, heretical, and schismatical, evil, etc. toward your Majesty’s Government and the Government of the Church of England. And they repeated the title to the children’s books mentioned above. One said:- Ques. “Who are the right subjects of baptism? Ans.- “Believers, or godly men and women only who can make confession of their faith and repentance.”  From the age of 28 until his death he pastored the same church. He was the first coming out of the persecution to begin public singing. {B. Evans, The early English Baptists (London: J. Heaton and Son, 1864), 2:308-9. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D.551-53]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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199 – July, 18 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The importance of a godly wife

 

Only eternity can reward the wives of the great preachers of the past such as the godly wife of Benjamin Keach, who at 28 years of age, was called to pastor the Baptist church at Horsleydown London in 1668. This holy lady, who had borne him five children in ten years, died in 1670, and Keach wrote a poem in her memory entitled “A Pillar Set Up.” In this poem he gave her a very great and noble character, commending her for her zeal for the truth, sincerity in religion, uncommon love to the saints, and her content in whatsoever condition of life God was pleased to bring her to. He particularly observes, how great an help, and comfort, she was to him in his suffering for the cause of Christ, visiting, and taking all possible care of him while in prison, instead of tempting him to use any means for delivery out of his troubles, encouraging him to go on, and counting it an honor done them both, in that they were called to suffer for the sake of Christ. He also said that some acknowledged that, that their conversion to God was thro’ the conversation they had with her.” Two years after her death, he married a widow of extraordinary piety with whom he lived thirty-two years. Susanna Partridge bore him five daughters, the youngest of whom married Thomas Crosby, a renowned Baptist historian. After the death of Keach, she lived with her daughter and son-in-law, and Crosby wrote of her, “She lived with me…the last twenty years of her life. I must say, that she walked before God in truth, and with a perfect heart, and did that which was good in His sight. She lived in peace, without spot and blameless.” Many godly wives saw their husbands pilloried, imprisoned, and treated roughly, and the encouragement of these women provided the strength that kept them strong.  Keach died July 18, 1704.  Joseph Stennett preached from, “I know whom I have believed.

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: adapted From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 294-95.

 

 

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