Tag Archives: baptist missions

256 – Sept. 13 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The Faith of the Lepers

 

1876 – Dr. James M. Haswell died after forty-one years of missionary service in Burma, with his dear wife Jane Mason, who he had married on August 23, 1835, and sailed for their chosen field one month later. He was more fruit from the Hamilton Theological Institute in Bennington, Vermont. Dr.Haswell mastered the Burmese language and then turned to the Pegulan dialect to reach the 80,000 of that tribe. He only took two furloughs, one in 1849 and another in 1867 and those were used to spur interest in missions. He was most diligent that his son James should follow him which he did but tragically died of cholera but a year after his father in 1877. But the Haswell vision lived on through their daughter Susan who founded the Maulmein Leper Colony in which she invested sixty years of her life. The government gave the land and the lepers themselves built the thatched roof buildings with, in some cases, stumps for hands and feet. It stood for years as a memorial to her and the faith of the lepers. Untold thousands were saved. [A.H. Burlingham, The Story of Baptist Missions in Foreign Lands (St. Louis: C.R. Barns Publishing Co., 1892), p. 944. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 501-02.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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252 – Sept. 09 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The Pastor of Firsts

 

1764 – Rev. Samuel Stillman became the sixth pastor of the First Baptist Church of Boston, Mass., which was the fourth oldest church in America. The church had endured persecution, decline and revivals. At age 27, Stillman found around sixty discouraged members. Those of prominence often attended services, including President John Adams. Samuel, a small man weighing less than 100 pounds at the time of his death in 1807 did gigantic exploits for God, many of them firsts. He had to flee during the Revolutionary War but returned to re-gather his flock. He helped establish America’s first Baptist College. He was a leader in the organization of the Warren Baptist Association to assist in the fight against the entanglement of the church and state. In 1802, ten years before the Judson’s and Rice went to Burma he led in starting the Mass. Baptist Missions Society. And First church was the first to install a stove for heat against the bitter New England winters. Alas, what worldliness, (Ha). [Nathan E. Wood, The History of the First Baptist Church of Boston (Philadelphia American Baptist Pub. Society, 1899), p. 242. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 494-95.] .]  Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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223 – Aug 11 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The Lord of the Harvest provides the reapers
Helen Maria Griggs was baptized and joined a Baptist church in Brookline, Mass., Aug. 11, 1822. She felt the call to Burma, and she married Francis Mason and spent their honeymoon aboard ship as they sailed the next day to Burma.   As a small girl Helen was very ill, but her mother prayed that the Lord would spare her, and at the same time, she gave her over to the will of God.  After several years her mother was willing to give her up, as Helen told her, of her call to  Burma. She was willing to go alone but the Lord of the Harvest was working in the heart of a young man, Francis Mason, a student at Newton Theological Institution who also planned to go to Burma. They were married on May 23, 1830. One hundred and twenty-two days later they arrived in Calcutta.  She was severely criticized when she had to leave their children behind in the homeland and Editors of Christian periodicals had to go to her defense and a drastic change in public opinion took place. The Lord took this dear one to Himself in her fortieth year on Oct. 8, 1846. G. Winfred Hervey, The Story of Baptist Missions in Foreign Lands, (St. Louis: C.R. Barns, 1892), p. 413.]  Prepared by Dr. Greg Dixon

 

 

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