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JANUARY 13 – FLEE


JANUARY 13 – FLEE

Exodus 14:25– “… let us flee from the face of Israel; for the LORD fighteth for them against the Egyptians.

How often do we face obstacles that seem as if they will crush us? We are consumed with worry and doubt. We don’t know how we will get through a particular situation. God says in the 37 Psalm to “Fret not thyself because of evildoers, … .” He also says “Rest in the LORD, and wait patiently for him: fret not theyself… “ Do not get irritated or agitated because of your enemy.

If we could be obedient and put our trust in the LORD, how much better our health would be. There will always be those that oppose us. Don’t worry. There will always be those that want to destroy us, Don’t worry. Our trust is, or rather should be, in the LORD and not our own understanding.

There are times that fear and uncertainty causes us to stop. Remember that Israel was caught between mountains on each side, the sea in front and Pharoah’s army to the rear. God provided a way for them by opening the Red Sea for a safe passage for Israel. This safe passage became a death trap for Pharoah’s army. God delivered the nation of Israel against all odds.

God loves you just as much as He loves Israel. We may face trials and tribulations but God say “fret no thyself.” Do not worry I am hear and I will fight for you. I will deliver you from or deliver you through every problem and trial that you will face. I love you and will keep you from all harm. How much faith do you have in God?

Exodus 19:1 – ye shall be Holy

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216 – August, 04 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Cross Wickenden

As the son of Charles CIay I fear no man

Elder Eleazer Clay was born August 04, 1744, a rugged Virginian, and when just a boy of 14, he enlisted in the army and fought in the French and Indian War. He moved to Chesterfield County and married Miss Jane Apperson. It was here that he came under deep conviction of sin as a result of the preaching of William Webber, Joseph Anthony, and John Weatherford, who preached through the prison grates. Clay made his profession of faith in Christ in Aug. of 1771, and became a member of the Baptist church, and was soon preaching the gospel of Christ. Col. Cary, magistrate of the county said that he left Elder Clay alone and arrested others for preaching because Clay had a livelihood, and he took the others under the “vagrant law.” Clay was probably the richest preacher in Virginia. He used his wealth to help the other preachers in prison and to build a Baptist meetinghouse that he planted as the first Baptist church in Chesterfield, County. He was not without enemies. A man rode into the yard where he was preaching in a private house and said that he had come to “cowhide him.” Clay said, “I am the son of Charles Clay, and I fear no man. If I have to go out after him, I will give him one of the worst whippings of his life.” Obviously the gentleman didn’t accomplish his objective. Clay pastored the church that he planted for over sixty-years. He loved the Word of God and read his New Testament once each month in addition to his O.T. reading. He went to be with the Lord at 92 years of age. His brother John Clay was one of the imprisoned preachers of Virginia and the great Kentucky statesman Henry Clay was his nephew.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 319-20.

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332 – Nov. 28 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

He refused a license to preach

 

1628 – Is the traditional birth date of John Bunyan; the “immortal tinker” and “glorious dreamer”, as historians call him, was born in the village of Elstow, near Bedford, England. In 1644 he was drafted into the army, and in June 1645 he returned to his home of Bedford. He said that he was vile in his youth, but about 1649 married a poor girl who brought with her two books, The plain man’s Pathway to Heaven, and The Practice of Piety. One day he overheard some women talking about spiritual matters and he entered in, but was no match for them. They were members of a little Baptist congregation in Bedford whose pastor was John Gifford to whom they introduced the tinker. Gifford immersed Bunyan after he had endured a lengthy and trying period of deep seated, emotional conviction, when the Lord spoke sweet peace to his heart. He explains it in his book, Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners (1666). In 1660 while preaching in a farmhouse near Ampthill, Bunyan was arrested, tried, and imprisoned. He spent the next twelve years in the Bedford jail. He could have been released at anytime if he had only taken a license from the Church of England to preach. In 1672 he was released by the Declaration of Indulgence, and at that time he became a licensed preacher and Pastor by the Baptist church at Bedford. The next year the Edict was cancelled and he was rearrested and imprisoned again for six months. Some believe that it was at this time that the famed Pilgrim’s Progress was written. He served as pastor for 16 years until his death and is buried at Bunhill Fields, the dissenter’s Westminster Abbey. [This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 651-53. Alfred W. Light, Bunhill Fields London: C.J. Farncombe & Sons, Ltd., 1915)., pp. 17-18.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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MILITARY SUFFERS WAVE OF ‘GAY’ SEX ASSAULTS


Posted: 28 May 2013 06:23 PM PDT

 

WND RADIO

 

‘We’ve got a male-on-male problem here’

 

A recent military report on sexual assault in the military shocked many in Washington and around the nation, but a leading expert on military personnel revealed the prevalence of men assaulting other men is one of the major headlines in this study.

 

The extended analysis of the report first appeared in Monday’s edition of the the Washington Times.

 

 

The Defense Department survey of sexual assault in the military during fiscal 2012 estimated 26,000 assaults took place in the armed forces. Nearly 3,000 of them were formally reported. Just more than 6 percent of women reported being victims of assault and 1.2 percent of men said the same. Given the much larger number of men in the military, those numbers suggest 14,000 of the assaults in the Pentagon study happened to men.

 

Among the assaults formally reported, 88 percent of reports came from women and 12 percent from men. The numbers are getting dramatically worse.

 

“The number of reports of sexual assaults among military personnel have actually increased by 129 percent since 2004,” said Center for Military Readiness President Elaine Donnelly, who pointed out the number of formal reports of sexual assault jumped from 1,275 to 2,949 in just eight years.

 

 

She told WND when factoring in civilians working for or around the military, the increase in that time is 98 percent.

 

 

Women are identified as the attacker in just two percent of all assaults, meaning most men who suffer assault are targeted by other men.

“So we’ve got a male-on-male problem here. The Department of Defense doesn’t want to comment on this. They know that the numbers are there. They say that they care, but all the attention is usually given to the female members of the military who are subjected to sexual assault,” Donnelly said.

 

 

The Washington Times article also includes analysis from Aaron Belkin, who heads The Palm Center. He said the rise in male-on-male sexual assault does not reflect the increase of homosexuals in the military but, rather, those assaults are ”somewhat similar to prison rape.”

 

 

“Well, that’s a great slogan to use for recruiting young men into the military, isn’t it? It’s outrageous. And yet, the Department of Defense doesn’t quite know what to do with these figures, and so they just sort of put them in there and hope nobody notices,” said Donnelly, who points out The Palm Center is a homosexual activist organization.

While Donnelly fiercely opposed repealing the ban on homosexuals serving openly in the military, she said it’s important to keep monitoring the numbers to determine how much that policy change specifically contributes to the problem. She said the increase in sexual assaults against female service members should not be diminished, either. Donnelly said a lot of work lies ahead to reverse this trend, but the military and the federal government are kidding themselves if they don’t think some major policy decisions aren’t contributing to the rise in sexual violence.

 

“I think we have to start with the basics, and that means basic training. Back in 1998, unanimously, the Kassebaum-Baker Commission came out with recommendation to separate basic training for Army, Air Force and Navy trainers, (to) do it like the Marines do. The Marines train basic training separately, male and female at Parris Island. That’s a good thing to do. It’s a good first start,” Donnelly said.

“Second, they should stop pretending that sexuality does not matter. You cannot solve a problem by extending it into the combat arms. The big push is for women in combat, this argument that we have to have women in the infantry so they’ll be respected more and they won’t be assaulted,” said Donnelly, who noted that the strategy for women in combat that started more than a generation ago from then-Rep. Pat Schroeder, D-Colo., has been thoroughly discredited.

 

 

“Respect for women in the military today is higher than ever, but the sexual assault numbers keep climbing up,” she said. “I think before we start implementing a theory that’s been discredited.  The members of the Pentagon and the people who make policy in Congress as well, they need to stop.  They need to assess where we are, what has happened in the last two decades and they need to stop pretending that a lot of sensitivity training or highly paid consultants, that that is going to make a difference in the sex problems we’re seeing right now,” said Donnelly.

In 2012, Donnelly told WND that the statistics showed a more than 20 percent increase in reported sexual assaults on males.

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34 – Feb. 03 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


The Eternal Optimist
Glen H Schunk was born in Scales Mound, Illinois, on February 3, 1918 into a German-Irish Catholic family.
Glen met an honor student from his local school in Freeport, Illinois, on a blind date, Irma Hartwig. After two years of courtship, they married August 29, 1938, in Dubuque, Iowa.  Irma was converted at the age of thirteen. When Glen enthusiastically came to his new-found faith, his personal witness led some family members to the Lord.
America’s involvement in World War II  saw Glen being drafted into the army.  Being on the front lines,  often in foxholes, with bullets flying overhead, he would take out his New Testament for consolation.  During  those experiences Glen won many fellow soldiers to Christ.  Glen was wounded in action and sent to a military hospital in Naples, Italy and placed in a ward with 1,000 men.  There the Lord moved in Glen’s heart as he saw the spiritual need of the men, and concluded that God wanted him to preach.  As a result of his converts there, over 400 men were in attendance at the Bible study classes.  Many of those men went into the ministry.  Glen and Irma Shunk traveled together for twenty-two years, and in nearly 900 revival meetings, it is estimated that they witnessed the salvation of over 60,000 people.  On June 6, 1978 the Lord called his servant home.  An amazing number of preachers attended his funeral in South Bend, Indiana, with the auditorium filled with those who wished to pay respects to a man who had faithfully proclaimed the Gospel of Christ.
Dr. Dale R. Hart, adapted from:  This Day in Baptist History  III (David L. Cummins), pp. 69-70

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