The Goldbergs



The Goldberg Brothers – The Inventors of the Automobile Air Conditioner
  

Here’s a little fact for automotive buffs, or just to dazzle your friends. 
The four Goldberg brothers, Lowell, Norman, Hiram, and Max, invented and developed the first automobile air-conditioner. On July 17, 1946, the temperature in Detroit was 97 degrees. 
  
The four brothers walked into old man Henry Ford’s office and sweet-talked his secretary into telling him that four gentlemen were there with the most exciting innovation in the auto industry since the electric starter.   
Henry was curious and invited them into his office.   
They refused and instead asked that he come out to the parking lot to their car. 
They persuaded him to get into the car, which was about 130 degrees, turned on the air conditioner, and cooled the car off immediately.
  
The old man got very excited and invited them back to the office, where he offered them $3 million for the patent. 
The brothers refused, saying they would settle for $2 million, but they wanted the recognition by having a label, ‘The Goldberg Air-Conditioner,’ on the dashboard of each car in which it was installed. 
  
Now old man Ford was more than just a little anti-Jewish, and there was no way he was going to put the Goldberg’s name on two million Fords.   
They haggled back and forth for about two hours and finally agreed on $4 million and that just their first names would be shown.   
And so to this day, all Ford air conditioners show —   
Lo, Norm, Hi, and Max — on the controls. 

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TO WHAT PURPOSE IS THIS WASTE – MATT. 26:8


Mat 26:8  But when his disciples saw it, they had indignation, saying, To what purpose is this waste? 

Do you believe in being frugal with the Lord’s money? Being careful with the Lord’s money is an admirable trait. But can we be so frugal or careful that we miss opportunities of reaching the lost?

How often we look for direct results from our efforts. How often we are disappointed by the response. We vow not to invest in that means again because it was not profitable. Are we not looking for increase directly from the work we have done? What does the scripture say about increase?

1Co_3:6  I have planted, Apollos watered; but God gave the increase.

7  So then neither is he that planteth any thing, neither he that watereth; but God that giveth the increase.

It is apparent that God gives the increase. Should we then consider that our duty is to be obedient? If we are faithful in obedience, the work will be rewarded. So many today say that house to house door knocking is not effective because they do not see results. Let me rephrase that statement. They do not see results from the work they are directly involved in. I do believe that God wants us to understand he is responsible for giving the increase. This reminds me of a story I read. In a meeting at a certain church a question was asked, how many lost have you lead to the Lord. One woman said, over 2000. That is over an average of 5 per day. There was great pride in the answer. Here we have the “I” in salvation and the pride that attends “I”.

2Co_9:10  Now he that ministereth seed to the sower both minister bread for your food, and multiply your seed sown, and increase the fruits of your righteousness;)

We need to use God’s approved means and methods. We need to scatter the seed. Sometimes, scattering the seed has a cost. Notice that the scripture above says, “increase the fruits of your righteousness.” Our righteous faithfulness brings the attention of God and he provides the increase. So often we look to the work of our hands to produce the increase when we should look to duty and faithfulness and righteousness and let God provide the increase. Let us be generous in providing for the needs of Soul Winning.

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THE AGE OF EXPERIMENTATION


William Andrew Dillard

Just imagine a world in which clocks and calendars were either non-existent or largely meaningless if they did exist. This world would host men of great talent in musical arts, metal craft, animal husbandry, etc. Moreover, this imaginary world existed in an ideal climate all year long, century after century. Additionally, there were not a lot of regulatory laws, making human freedom the best humanity has ever enjoyed. Furthermore, the diseases that plague humanity today were unknown in this pristine environment. Does this sound divine; too good to be true; something that could only exist in one’s imagination? Well think again!
The world under consideration did in fact exist for a long 1656 years, from Adam to Noah. The antediluvian world though devoid of most conveniences enjoyed today, had a lot going for it including individual longevity approaching one thousand years. It could be called the age of experimentation. What will sinful mankind do, left largely to himself? Will he be grateful for his blessings, and seek after his Creator? Will he respect himself and his neighbor, and seek to make a better world for himself and his offspring?
In Genesis Chapter Six, God looked down to see what was going on in the world of men. What He saw was corruption; moral degradation, base sensuality reigning as king in an epicurean, drunken, sex crazy world. It was a world of faithlessness. Thus, it repented Him that He had made the human race, and He determined to destroy it.
Today, in spite of vaunted progress, the world is quite similar to that ancient society. It is a sign. Jesus said that when He comes again, the world will be as it was in the days of Noah. Matt 24:37-39.
But consider that it is not the absence of sin that divinity seeks in mankind. That is impossible. But it is the presence of faith. When the Son of man shall come, will He find faith on the earth? Luke 18:8. In the absence of faith, men, nations, and the world are wrong, and they degenerate into the sensual, violent quagmire of Noah’s day.
The good news is that Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord. Noah was a man of faith; a righteous man, perfect in his generations. It would be his lot to inherit a new world, a new beginning. Do you see a pattern here? People of faith in God and His eternal Word will inherit the universe with Christ Jesus, while those who submerge themselves in base pleasures of the flesh are destined to loss of life’s reward at best and eternal condemnation at worse. How much of your life is given to matters of faith in God and His Word? Every person is either contributing to the cause of Christ and goodness in the world or else to the cause of Satan and evil in the world. Sin cannot be eliminated from our world, but it can be repented of, and faith can find a dwelling and growing place in human hearts. The age of experimentation is history, but it bears unerring witness of an inevitable conclusion. In keeping with the pattern of the ages: in the absence of faith, no one may be right in the sight of God.

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Acknowledge Him


In all thy ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct thy paths. (Proverbs 3:6, KJB)

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Temptation


When you flee temptation, don’t leave a forwarding address

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WHAT DID BARNABAS DO THAT WAS SO RIGHT?


William Andrew Dillard

“Barnabas” is a Greek word, but it is spelled the same in Greek and in English. The name means “Son of rest, or consolation” according to Greek lexicons. Biblically, it is the name of a Levite, native of Cyprus, who was a distinguished Christian teacher, missionary companion, and colleague of the apostle Paul.
Since his name appears in the New Testament some twenty-nine times, the question naturally arises, “What did Barnabas do that was so right?” Think with me!
Barnabas contributed heavily to the need of the saints in Jerusalem immediately following Pentecost, Acts 4:36-37. This is the first mention of his name, but far from the last.
Barnabas was first to receive Saul as a changed man after the Damascus Road experience. He brought him to the apostles, being quick to recognize the work of God in the life of another. Acts 9:26-28.
Barnabas answered the call to help the newly formed church at Antioch. He realized the enormity of the task and immediately went to Tarsus to enlist the help of Saul. He and Saul taught much in the church at Antioch for an entire year. Then he, with Saul, carried relief for the suffering saints in Jerusalem. Afterward, he answered with Saul, the call to carry the gospel to regions beyond.
Barnabas preached the Word in Cyprus, and Galatia. He suffered persecution with Saul in Derbe and Lystra.
In spite of considerable dissention between himself and Saul, who had now come to be known as Paul, over the weakness and failure of John Mark, he teamed up with Mark and went on preaching the gospel in regions beyond, not letting a strong difference of opinion become a stumbling block to his God-called ministry.
Barnabas is last mentioned in Colossians 4:10 as a relative to Mark who though once rejected by Paul was encouraged to be received and used of the saints.
In short, Barnabas lived an admirable life of dedicated service to God, and to his fellow men. And that is so right!
As it was with him, so it is with many modern day disciples. The obstacles, the persecution, and the fleshly desire for one’s own comfort zone will be there, and exert themselves more than once. But the gospel burns a fire in the bones, and the grace of God that is sufficient for every man comes to the forefront. We love God because He first loved us. He took our place on the cross, and opened wide heaven’s gates for us. We must tell it, and that is so right!

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Repent and Believe


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November 23, 2019 · 10:41 AM

THANKFULNESS: INTROSPECTION’S PERSONAL STORY


William Andrew Dillard

Americans who claim to be Christians have a fairly strong conviction that they are indeed a thankful people. Perhaps that perception arises out of experiences of the past century. It was only one hundred years ago that the world was relieved by the ending of World War I, the war said to be the bloodiest of all wars. With that war ending, the nation entered an era of unparalleled prosperity in the roaring twenties. But so, soon was the rug yanked out from under the nation with the financial collapse of 1929, followed by a decade-long, Great Depression. Next, came World War II, then the Korean conflict, and Vietnam. Through these monumental events also came industrial, educational, and technological break-through in rapid advancement. The inflationary measures that now loom as a doomsday pitfall, was viewed as a blessing a half century ago, When, at last, people had some money. Production of material things flooded the markets for people to buy. There came new cars, new houses, new clothes, and a million other things. People were happy. People were thankful. Really?
Some pundit said that “America is the only country on earth where people will trample you to get to annual sales items on the day after they proclaimed they were truly thankful for what they have.” Somehow, that paints a mental picture that is oxymoronic, and far from the humble, grateful spirit – the attitude of gratitude – so prominent among the early pilgrims. They knew it was only by the grace of God that they survived the harsh obstacles of life in an undeveloped land.
But thankfulness is not an attitude franchised by the poor, deprived, and/or oppressed upon their achieving better circumstances. It is rather a vastly important plank in the platform of wisdom to those who seize and employ its model. Whether poor or wealthy, ignorant or educated, ill or healthy, the blessings of the Almighty are superabundant to those who look for them. And, the look need not be far. A peek deep down inside at a view restricted to the individual and God tells it all, and it does not lie. What is the scene? Is it spoiled, selfish longing for some self-exalting acquisition of popularity, power, or material thing that will ultimately contribute to ruin? Is it gratefulness to God for life itself? Is it the mountainous blessings afforded God’s children, and a heart of thankful realization upon confronting or hearing of so many unfortunate cases which evoke a soft, sincere, whisper: “There, but by the grace of God go I.” Truly, those who know Jesus the Christ on a personal basis should be the most thankful people on the planet. Introspection! How does it tell your story?

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WHAT DID APOLLOS DO THAT WAS SO RIGHT?


William Andrew Dillard

The array of Biblical characters is as broad as life in any generation, this one notwithstanding. They are presented unshielded, fully depicting the depravity of man, and they are also presented in the marvelous glory of sinful men serving the Lord in righteousness through the grace of Christ Jesus. One such character that stands in the biblical spotlight is Apollos, introduced to us in Acts 18:24-19:7. Think with me about him.
One outstanding attribute of Apollos was his educational level. He was an Alexandrian Jew. This meant he was native to the thriving city of Alexandria on the northern African coast. The city was commensurate with Carthage and Rome. It was especially an educationally motivated city with the best libraries of the world, and renown teachers. Consequently, Apollos excelled in arts. He was a polished speaker commanding a large vocabulary and great skills in debate.
It is to the credit of Apollos that he had received Christ Jesus as his personal Savior, and answered the burden to preach the Word. However, his understanding of much of Christianity was incomplete. Consequently, he did not preach or practice correctly. Paul discovered the error of Apollos as he came upon a group presenting themselves as a New Testament church, but without the obvious blessing they should have had. The error of their baptism previously administered by Apollos was corrected, but neither the spiritual salvation of this group nor the baptism of John was questionable.
About that time, two of Paul’s faithful helpers, Aquila and Priscilla heard him preach. Noting his lack of information, they took him aside and expounded the way of the Lord more perfectly. Perhaps it was over a fried chicken dinner on Sunday afternoon.
How did that work out? The truth which Aquila and Priscilla shared fit perfectly with the incomplete information Apollos had. He received that truth, and he was thankful for the spiritual help afforded him. He went on to become a respected minister by Paul who recommended him, and used him to confound the Jews, and to edify the saints. His name is called a number of times in the Pauline epistles. His humility, dedication, and sharing the gospel as uniquely as only one with his background could do was so right. It is also right that all of us should follow that example.

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WHAT DID JOB DO THAT WAS SO RIGHT?


William Andrew Dillard

Job! To many, that name is a byword, an identification of troubles, and trials in life that rings down through the ages. But it is a powerful reminder that bad things really do happen to good people, and sometimes it is hard to understand why, or for what purpose.
In his case, Job was a righteous man, highly blessed of God whom he both knew and served. Unknown to him was a trial coming his way that easily transcended the mastery of man, but that is not what it was all about. It was a testing for time and eternity to friend and foe that the grace of God is sufficient in whatever temptations, trials, and illnesses life may bring.
God held Job up as an example, but Satan insisted that it was all because of the blessings of God upon him. Take those away, he said, and Job would curse God. (hum, sounds like Satan had already witnessed human failure.)
The contest began. Job lost his sons, all of them. He lost his great herds of cattle, camels, and other animals. Last but not least, Job broke out in severe boils all over his body. He could stand no clothing so he sat in a pile of ashes, covering himself with them, and scrapping his wounds with shredded pottery. To say that he was one extremely miserable character would be a gross understatement. This went on for days, then weeks, then months. His friends who came to console him only succeeded in making matters worse through their lack of understanding.
Misery was piled upon misery! So much so that all generations after him recoil at the bad things God allowed Satan to cast upon him. So, what did Job do that was so right?
Job resisted temptation to sin with his lips. Even when his wife in doubtless pity urged him to cast off his integrity, and curse God and die. Job blessed the Lord.
Job exalted God in praise, avowing that he knew his Savior and that He would stand in the latter day upon the earth. He testified that even though he should die and skin worms destroy his body, yet he would see God with his own eyes and not those of another.
Although Job did not have scriptures to bolster his faith as modern mankind does, he remained true to God, and to the faith he had been given. To put God first, and as one’s only hope beyond this vail of tears is always the right thing to do. Job did just that, and you., dear reader, should follow that example because it is so right!!

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