The Founding of the Thessalonian Church  


 

Acts 17:1-10

“And some of them believed, and consorted with Paul and Silas; and of the devout Greeks a great multitude, and of the chief women not a few,” Acts 17:4.

 

Paul frequented the synagogues wherever his missionary journeys took him. He would preach the truths about Jesus. The audience would either reject the message, riot or believe. He would gather the believers and teach them, and when he left the town, there was usually a New Testament church established. Often he would visit the believers again, ordaining preachers and teachers, that they might exhibit the supernatural gifts of the Holy Spirit to conduct God’s business through His churches. The supernatural gifts were necessary in the early churches because instructions to the churches were not yet written. “Nevertheless I tell you the truth; It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you” (John 16:7). As long as Jesus’ physical body was present among the disciples, there was only one church, and He is the Head of the church.

“Even the Spirit of truth; whom the world cannot receive, because it seeth him not, neither knoweth him: but ye know him; for he dwelleth with you, and shall be in you. I will not leave you comfortless [orphans]: I will come to you” (John 14:17, 18). On the day of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit empowered the church. Therefore, they could spread the gospel all over the world, establish churches and Christ could be the Head of every one of them. Thus, we see His plan for creating New Testament churches, each one autonomous, governing itself in the work of evangelism, baptism and teaching the truths of God.

 

 

JUST SAYING

Jesus’ plan was to establish New Testament churches.

Robert Brock

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