Monthly Archives: May 2014

144 — May 23 This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Short but sweet

 

1734 – John Comer, a gentleman of education, piety and great success in his calling as a preacher of the gospel died just short of thirty years of age. He kept a journal of his life which was preserved by his family. After his conversion to Christ he was baptized by Elisha Callender, pastor of the Baptist church in Boston and soon began preaching in 1725. At that time a young preacher was placed with an older experienced man, so Comer became the co-pastor with Elder William Peckham of the Newport Church. As we saw in England, many of the churches had no congregational singing because of the persecution and so the same was true of the Newport church. However, Comer introduced singing to the church services. Also the practice of the laying on of hands after baptism was practiced by some, and because of Comer’s insistence of it being practiced caused his dismissal in 1729. He then preached as a supply pastor for two years in the Second Baptist Church in Newport, after which he became the pastor of a church in the southern part of Old Rehoboth, near to Swansea, about ten miles from Providence, R.I., where he went home to be with the Lord. The actual cause of his death was the dreaded disease of consumption (tuberculosis). He had collected a great deal of facts, intending to write a history of the early American Baptist churches, but his records became a source of blessing to others in their pursuit of that effort. Even though John Comer’s life was like a meteor that burns but a little while in the night sky, it shined bright for Christ and the Gospel even though his actual ministry only spanned a period of nine years.

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, pp. 210.

 

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Absent and Present


 

2 Corinthians 5:6-8

 

“We are confident, I say, and willing rather to be absent from the body, and to be present with the Lord,” 2 Corinthians 5:8.

 

 

 

Paul’s thesis in this passage is that we have two homes, one of the earth where we must live by faith. Since we cannot see our spiritual home with God, we long for that reunion when our yearning heart will be satisfied and at peace.

 

Often when children grow up and leave home, they find dreams do not come true so easily. After regrouping, they try their wings again until they, like Noah’s dove, can find a place of their own to lay their weary heads. Jesus told His would-be disciples, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head” (Luke 9:58). He knew this world was not His home. On the cross, He bowed His head and gave up the Spirit. In the Greek, the words “bowed his head” (John 19:30) are the same words as “lay his head.” On the cross, He finally found the place to lay His head. He had gone home.

 

Abraham, Isaac and Jacob lived by faith as strangers and pilgrims in a strange land, believing God had prepared them a city, and they would one day dwell there and be satisfied and at peace. Going home gives the child of God inspiration to get out of bed each morning and fight the battles assigned to him that day.

 

Going through the throws of basic training and cutting the apron strings, I called home as often as I could. Finally, I got a furlough. I happily arrived home to find my three brothers had divided all my clothes and one was sleeping in my bed. It hit me hard. This is not your home anymore.

 

 

 

JUST SAYING

 

This world is not our home. We are pilgrims and strangers passing through, convincing as many as we can to go with us.

 

Robert Brock

 

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Depart Here—Arrive There


 

Philippians 1:20-24

 

“For I am in a strait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to be with Christ; which is far better,” Philippians 1:23.

 

Paul was in prison, writing to his beloved friends in Philippi. He set their minds at ease. Paul told his friends not to be worrying about him. He told them that, if he lived, Christ was living through him. He also told them that, if he died, he would be immediately with God in Heaven. Paul wanted the people to know whether he lived or died, Jesus would be magnified. To Timothy, when Paul was facing death, “Nevertheless I am not ashamed: for I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him against that day” (2 Tim. 1:12). Can you see the unadulterated confidence, facing death toe to toe like a little mischievous boy standing behind his daddy’s legs, sticking out his tongue at the world?

 

There is a song about time where the singer took a nap at six years of age and woke up and he was twenty-two years old. Life is really like that. One hardly gets accustomed to one life change before the next one comes crashing in like a freight train. My wife, Ella, and I have three amazing sons who make our lives worth living. I had funny little boys around my neck like jewelry for thirty years. One morning I woke up, and my nest was empty. I almost had a nervous breakdown. Take a nap again and wake up, and we are buying burial plots and making funeral plans at the funeral home just in case.

 

 

JUST SAYING

 

Make yourself a list and put Jesus in the number 1 position. Make sure your children know where all your treasure is hidden.

 

Robert Brock

 

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Promise of Life


 

John 11:25, 26

 

“Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die,” John 11:25, 26.

 

 

 

Jesus did not say to Martha, “I cause the resurrection, and I give eternal life.” He said, “I am the resurrection, and the life.” To possess the person of Jesus as Savior is to possess eternal life and eternal existence in an eternal body. “Though he were dead,” sounds fatalistic, but Jesus promised “yet shall he live” (verse 25). The same Creator who breathed life into Adam is the same Creator who gave every human an eternal spirit at conception. Paul wrote, “For what man knoweth the things of a man, save the spirit of man which is in him?” (1 Cor. 2:11). The spirit of man, breathed into him by the eternal God, is eternal and will live forever somewhere, either in Heaven or in hell. Our time on earth is an opportunity for us to decide where we want to spend eternity. Jesus told Martha, “Whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die” (John 11:26).

 

Death for a Christian is not a dying at all; it is a transition to the next level of eternal existence. Martha said she believed Jesus was the Son of God who had come into the world. This is the Christian’s motto, his ticket to leave the world of the temporary and enter the world of the eternal at the instant his earthly heart stops beating. When Lazarus came out of the tomb bound in the mummy-cocoon of grave clothes, we can believe that Martha was a believer, indeed. We can only imagine what she said to Jesus.

 

JUST SAYING

 

Be sure you will be ready to go to the Father’s house to spend eternity with our advocate, Jesus Christ.

 

Robert Brock

 

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Our Immediate Trial Directly After Ordination !!!!!!!


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When Democracy Ceases To Be


A very good friend of mine posted this and I think it is extremely relevant today. My concern is not for myself over these developments. I have a home in Glory that has been promised me and shall never be taken away. My remaining time on this corrupt earth is a short time and then I will be with my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. My concern is for my children, grand-children and great grand-children. If the Lord delays his coming, they will be in this ever increasingly corrupt world, subjected to un-imagined immorality, ethically devoid deviants. This breaks my heart for my loved ones.

 

The Library of Congress attributes the following to Professor Alexander Tytler, writing about democracy in the ancient Athenian pattern. It is amazingly relevant!

“A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves money from the Public Treasury.
From that moment on the majority always votes for candidates promising the most benefits from the Public Treasury with the result that a democracy always collapses over loose fiscal policy always followed by dictatorship.
The average of the world’s greatest civilizations has been 200 years. These nations have progressed through the following sequence.
From bondage to spiritual faith; from spiritual faith to great courage; from courage to liberty.
From liberty to abundance; from abundance to selfishness; from selfishness to complacency.
From complacency to apathy; from apathy to dependence; from dependence back into bondage.

— copied

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31– May 10 – This Day in Baptist History Past


Richard Furman
“The Apostle of Education”
Richard Furman began to preach at the age of 16 and became popularly known as the “boy-evangelist.” Reese and Evan Pugh ordained him two years later, on May 10, 1774, as pastor of High Hills. After a fruitful ministry there of 13 years, he became pastor of the Charleston Baptist Church, which he served for the rest of his life. “In the community no minister ever enjoyed so large a share of general confidence and reverence.” For 38 years he made “annual excursions” into various parts of the state, preaching the gospel and promoting the interests of the denomination. This itinerant ministry resulted in numerous revivals and the formation of many churches. His eloquence and fame as a preacher once opened for him an opportunity to preach in the United States Congressional Hall.
During the time that education was suspect for ministers in the South, particularly among the Separate Baptists who feared that schools would dilute Baptist spirituality, divert mission money, and lead to a hireling ministry, Richard Furman become known as the “Apostle of Education.”  He led the association to form a General Committee in 1790 to administer educational funds.  This committee provided funds for scholarships to attend the Baptist College in Providence, Rhode Island, and for young men to study under pastors who would also lead them in the reading of theology.

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, pp. 191 -192
The post 131– May 10 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

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His Mercies Are Great  


Psalm 145:8-13
“The Lord is gracious, and full of compassion; slow to anger, and of great mercy,” Psalm 145:8.

Living by faith is difficult on the flesh. God knows that. Jesus was tempted in all points like as we are, yet without sin. Some think Jesus could have sinned in the flesh and had to burn out temptation in a fleshly body to earn the right to be our perfect sacrifice. However, Christ was the perfect Lamb slain before the foundation of the world and did not have to earn that right. He was tempted in all points like as we are that He might know firsthand what we go through and be the compassionate High Priest.
God cannot sin. He can make rules for man that He does not have to keep. He can tell man not to kill, and He can wipe whole races of man from the earth. Man may think that is not fair, but God is the Creator, and He does not consult with man before executing His plans. God determines what is best for man, regardless of man’s attitude about it. Yet, He is long-suffering toward man, not willing that any should perish, but that all would repent and come to Him. He is an ever-present help to give aid in times of need. He knows our limitations, and when we cross the line while depending on our own resources, He is full of grace to help us. First, we must acknowledge that we cannot handle life on our own. We were created to function plugged in to the source of our energy, both physical and spiritual energy. Regardless of how magnificent a motor might be, it can do nothing of itself without an outside source of energy. Jesus quoted this law, “Without me ye can do nothing” (John 15:5). Nothing is all inclusive.
JUST SAYING
Perhaps you know someone whose life is confused and mangled. Have him read 2 Corinthians 4:6-10.
Robert Brock

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130 — May 09 – This Day in Baptist History Past


“So He Slew Me with the Words of His Mouth”
Founder of Brown Universitry

Morgan Edwards was born in Wales, May 9, 1722. He was educated at Bristol College under Bernard Foskett, its first president. He was ordained June 1, 1757, in Cork, Ireland, where he labored for nine years. He returned to England and preached for a year in Rye, in Sussex, when, through the recommendation of Dr. Gill and others, on the application of the Baptist church of Philadelphia, he came to that city and church, and entered upon the pastorate May 23, 1761.
At age sixteen he broke with his Anglican heritage and embraced the principles of the Baptists. This cleavage could have been caused by the infectious enthusiasm of the young Baptist missionaries who were sent out in such large numbers that hardly a village in the eastern and western valleys of Monmouthshire was not visited.  When he was pastor of the Baptist Church of Philadelphia many years later, he reminisced in a sermon as follows:
I remember the time (and the place too) when I first gave myself up as a lost man; for then I was halting between two opinions about it.  Fearing it was so, made me uneasy, and hope it might not be so, kept me from yielding to it.  But this sentence stuck on my mind in a light that it was not wont to do, ‘I will by no means clear the Guilty!’ then said I, I am gone, for I am guilty: if I am not damned God must be a liar. So He slew me with the word of His mouth. Then this commandment came, and I died.  Then I knew what sort of thing despair was. And you cannot imagine what jolt I felt, when I learnt so much of the Gospel as to know it was possible for me to be saved, and that God might stand to His word, and not send me to hell.
He was the founder of Brown University, at first called Rhode Island College. It is well known that this enterprise was started in the Philadelphia Baptist Association in its meeting in 1762, and Morgan Edwards was “the principal mover in this matter,” as he was the most active agent in securing funds for the permanent support of the institution. To Morgan Edwards more than to any other man, are the Baptist churches of America indebted for their grand list of institutions of learning, with their noble endowments and wide-spread influence.

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 189 -190
The post 130 — May 09 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

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Remedy for Sin  


Micah 7:7-9
“I will bear the indignation of the Lord, because I have sinned against him, until he plead my cause, and execute judgment for me: he will bring me forth to the light, and I shall behold his righteousness,” Micah 7:9.

I once heard a deacon tell a congregation, “We’re just human. We can’t help but sin.” Jesus taught His disciples, “Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect”  (Matt.5:48). God did not give us a license to sin because we are saved. Our security is in Christ, but some nominal Christians find security a loophole to continue in sin. Paul presented a formula in Romans 6 for stopping sin before it stops us. (1) Know that we died to sin with Christ on His cross. We do not have to sin if we do not want to. (2) Reckon that we have resurrected with Christ to serve God in a newness of life. (3) We must not yield our flesh to Satan as a weapon of war to use against us, but yield our bodies to God as an instrument of righteousness to bless others as we glorify His Son. We must let our lights shine so that others will see the Father in our works. That is supernatural.
Yes, we will fail, but when we do, it is not God’s fault. He has given us all the tools we need to live above sin, and that is not charismatic; that is Scripture. We have no scriptural excuse for sinning after salvation.
JUST SAYING
If sin was not pleasing to the flesh, Satan would not have any customers. Focus on the wretched consequences of sin.
Robert Brock

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