144 — May 23 This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Short but sweet

 

1734 – John Comer, a gentleman of education, piety and great success in his calling as a preacher of the gospel died just short of thirty years of age. He kept a journal of his life which was preserved by his family. After his conversion to Christ he was baptized by Elisha Callender, pastor of the Baptist church in Boston and soon began preaching in 1725. At that time a young preacher was placed with an older experienced man, so Comer became the co-pastor with Elder William Peckham of the Newport Church. As we saw in England, many of the churches had no congregational singing because of the persecution and so the same was true of the Newport church. However, Comer introduced singing to the church services. Also the practice of the laying on of hands after baptism was practiced by some, and because of Comer’s insistence of it being practiced caused his dismissal in 1729. He then preached as a supply pastor for two years in the Second Baptist Church in Newport, after which he became the pastor of a church in the southern part of Old Rehoboth, near to Swansea, about ten miles from Providence, R.I., where he went home to be with the Lord. The actual cause of his death was the dreaded disease of consumption (tuberculosis). He had collected a great deal of facts, intending to write a history of the early American Baptist churches, but his records became a source of blessing to others in their pursuit of that effort. Even though John Comer’s life was like a meteor that burns but a little while in the night sky, it shined bright for Christ and the Gospel even though his actual ministry only spanned a period of nine years.

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, pp. 210.

 

2 Comments

Filed under Church History

2 responses to “144 — May 23 This Day in Baptist History Past

  1. I appreciate this series on Baptist History. It is a wake up call to recognize the great sacrifices of Godly men through the ages who sought to perpetuate the truths of God’s Word. Lord bless you!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s