292 – Oct. 19 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

The martyrs of Italy

1562 – Giulio Guirlanda was the first person who was put to death for Christ in the City of Venice, Italy, though several had suffered martyrdom in the territories of that Republic. He sank into the deep waters, calling upon the Lord Jesus in the fortieth year of his age. The next to follow him in the steps of His Savior was Antonio Ricetto, who was a most honorable man of God. Great efforts were made by the senate to induce him to recant, they even used his little son to beg him to, but it was all in vain. He prayed for those who put him to death, and commended his soul to his Savior as he was drowned on Feb. 15, 1566. The next martyr was Francesco Spinula; he was drowned ten days after Ricetto. But the most distinguished of all the martyrs of Venice was Fra Baldo Lupetino. He was of a noble and ancient family, became a monk, and rose to a high rank in his Order. After proclaiming the gospel in and out of Italy, he was thrown into prison by the inquisitor of the pope’s legate where he wallowed for nearly twenty years. The Protestant German princes interceded with the senate for his life; but the pope and his inquisitor demanded death-which he met with firmness, and great peace. In their report in 1928, the Baptists of Italy spoke of their “glorious roll of martyrs.” We rejoice that Baptist missionaries are once again carrying the good news to Italy. Please pray for them. [J.M. Cramp, Baptist History (London: Elliot Stock, 1870), p. 121. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. 572-73].   Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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